Clevo Overclocker's Lounge

Discussion in 'Sager/Clevo Reviews & Owners' Lounges' started by Spartan@HIDevolution, Mar 4, 2016.

  1. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

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    Gotta watch those VRMs with such clocks and so many extra cores.
     
  2. hissy

    hissy Notebook Consultant

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    Greetings once more, good sirs.
    So, I got to shunt modding my Clevo RTX2070. Managed to get the mod working, but now have a problem.
    Under heavy load, system shuts itself down quickly. Apparently gpu draws too much power and triggers system's protection?, i think?
    I vaguely remember seeing something about this around here, but can't find now. Could someone help me?
     
  3. jc_denton

    jc_denton BGA? What a shame.

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    Are you on a single 330w brick or two? Does the system just instantly turn itself off at a given wattage? What shunts did you mod and how, ie. RS1/RS2. Could be that one of the shunts is pci-e power and the EC freaks out if it pulls over 75watts on that rail.

    I'd test each shunt before and after (if your mod is undoable) and see how the system reacts.
     
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  4. hissy

    hissy Notebook Consultant

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    Single brick, but with 90W limited CPU running at most 30-40w in a game should it be of concern?
    System dies under benchmark levels of load, between 5-10 seconds and around minute depending on how bad the load was (i.e. it took longer when i manually limited clock and voltage to a bit lower. Clock started to drop slightly due to temp).
    Works fine under lighter load, one that normally had power headroom to go a bit higher than powerlimited 1620 mhz.
    Mod is just short wires across the sensor end of resistors, easily undoable. But hey, it works! Surely it's too bold, card thinks it draws 30W x)
    I don't know if one is for pcie, didn't think about this possibility. That'll be some weird long trace across entire board to get pcie power to where resistors are...
    PCB itself is apparently same as in 2080, so if you or someone else had it, they could tell.
    Thanks for advice, i'll try doing one at a time and will report later.
     
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  5. Aerokski

    Aerokski Notebook Enthusiast

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    With power limit unlocked vrm can get prety hot. Make sure it has enough cooling, especially in p775. About power supply when i accidently run time spy on my machine on oc profile with one 330W power supply, it turned off and supply also was turned off (the protections in the power supply worked).
     
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  6. hissy

    hissy Notebook Consultant

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    No way to see if it hot though...

    meanwhile, removed my mess from... i think RS2? One closer to the boards edge, other one looks like it's directly attached to the power wire.
    No more shutoffs, and visible improvement, though not as big as i'd like
    https://www.3dmark.com/compare/spy/14765619/spy/14760392
     
  7. senso

    senso Notebook Deity

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    Tune your curve..
    My 115W 2070 is scoring almost the same as your power modded one, you cant just shunt mod and expect great results, you then use the curve editor and make use of the extra power so you can go to higher clocks/voltage without being power limited..

    Timespy Score.jpg

    My curve(could still be better fine tuned, but for now its good enough):
    2070 curve.png
     
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  8. hissy

    hissy Notebook Consultant

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    @senso , i'm somewhat offended by your assumption of my stupidity. I may be stupid, but not this much.
    upload_2020-10-24_20-48-20.png

    Are you even sure your card is 115W one? It's detected as "RTX 2070", not "RTX 2070 (Notebook)"
    for reference, my card without mods could reach 1620 mhz under load at max.
    * * *

    Update. After a break, system started dying during benchmarks again.
     
  9. hissy

    hissy Notebook Consultant

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    Update..
    So turns out, RS2 reads in system as GPU core power draw, RS1 is responsible for all other power readings, and together they form total board power that is limited. Result above was due to other powers being shunted to near 0 and all 115w going to GPU alone.
    I still don't know what makes it shut down, even at such relatively small power increase
    And i need actual resistors there, just shorting it makes limits way too low?
    Removed all mods for now.

    i feel experienced people here already know all that and more though...
     
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  10. senso

    senso Notebook Deity

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    I never said, or intended to say that you are stupid, if my text reads like so, I'm sorry, but its not my intention..
    Yes, I'm sure my 2070 is a 115W one, its an MSI GT75 9SF, and I can dump by VBIOS and check what is the wattage.

    But "only" 1650Mhz is what my stock curve did, maybe you got a pretty crappy die :/

    And yes, you should use resistors, a couple 3mOhm resistors in parallel will give you more than enough headroom for OC'ing, but if your GPU can only go up to 1650Mhz at 115W it might end needing so much power that it runs way too hot to be worthwhile.

    I would say, start by giving your curve another look, for example I have been playing Horizon Zero Dawn and my GPU is going up to 1900Mhz in that game, the rest of the games it stays more or less put at 1800Mhz, dropping at most to 1720-1750Mhz.
     
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