Clevo 2020

Discussion in 'Sager and Clevo' started by Dakka3, Aug 28, 2019.

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  1. jc_denton

    jc_denton BGA? What a shame.

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    Be sure to read @ole!!! s original mod, since the direct die frame needs to be modified, as the are SMDs near the socket that make mounting it impossible.

    KS is cool and all, but a good P0 scores a bin above it at same frequency. :p
     
  2. matyee

    matyee Notebook Deity

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    Thx I will. Could you also give me some hints how to solder the vapor chamber square to the TM1 heatsink? What temparature and with what (bismuth)?
    thx

    regarding the delid guard, we will cut off the tricky parts with dremel :)
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2020
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  3. ole!!!

    ole!!! Notebook Prophet

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    mr. fox's original video for soldering shim.
     
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  4. matyee

    matyee Notebook Deity

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    Thanks a lot!
    which is the max temp where I need to be very cautios not to damage the heatsink? (both tm1 and vapor)
    thx!!!
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2020
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  5. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    Well I can do 4.7 @ 1.021v load cinebench R20 and realbench 2.56 on a certain platform but I haven't tested 4.5 and I assume that's still too high for you?
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2020
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  6. ole!!!

    ole!!! Notebook Prophet

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    solder paste in video melting point is around 140C i think, but its the same cheap solder paste used by clevo. if you have TM1 heatsink then becareful with the added fins that didn't exist on pre TM heatsinks, those fins are cheaply soldered and will fall off so I'd recommend hold it down with a clamp
     
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  7. electrosoft

    electrosoft Perpetualist Matrixist

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    I think we both know 4.7 @ 1.021v rocks. :D I would be interested to see how low you can set BIOS voltage (sub 1.1) and your total pull @ LLC 6 traditional delid on air w/ no LM. Maybe see how under ~103w (RB 2.56 Stress 15 run) and 113w (CB20) you can get total draw? Depending on your numbers and exact setup (no esoteric custom water, direct die, etc...), maybe you would be interested in selling? You may have that chip I'm looking for. :)
     
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  8. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    I am under NDA for that information. This was just a quick test. Can't even tell you what SKU it is. But my 9900k has a 1.080v wall at 4.7 ghz. Any lower will BSOD. This is for SSE2 instructions.

    But I am surprised you said no one had a 9900KS that can do this. I saw one person with a delidded 9900KS that was running Prime95 FMA3 small FFT @ 5 ghz @ 1.078v (load). And many people (usually with Maximus XI Apex's) who were doing 1.128-1.140v load. And the Dark has even better transients...

    Just sent a PM to two people I know have golden 9900K/S chips to ask what their 4.7 ghz voltage floor is. Assuming I found the right people.

    x264 4.6 ghz 1.032v

    https://imgur.com/XVr0Vb3
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2020
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  9. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

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    Were those in desktops or laptops though?
     
  10. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    All in Desktops.

    Note: Sheriff PM'd me and said that his BIOS can't even set a voltage below 1.1v.

    Also as I mentioned before, you can't emulate setting 1.1v via "Override Mode" in a laptop with setting 1.1v on a desktop, with intel spec Loadline calibration being used, because (at 4.7 ghz, or even lower), the desktop will BSOD instantly due to Intel default vdroop being used (1.6 mOhms---for example a 138 amp load will cause the 1.1v to drop to 0.879v, (Math: 1100mv - ( 138 * 1.6 ); no 9900KS can run at that voltage at 4.5 ghz).

    On a laptop, setting 1.1v via "override mode" will cause the AC Loadline to save you from a BSOD. That's the entire problem.
    On a laptop, instead of having this formula:

    1100mv - ( 138 * 1.6 ) = 0.879v, where 138 is amps and 1.6 is Intel default Loadline calibration,
    You have this instead:

    If CPU default VID is 1100mv:
    vCPU=1100mv

    Vcore = vCPU + (AC Loadline mOhms * Amps) - (LLC mOhms * Amps) + offset voltage
    In this case, ACLL=1.6 mOhms, Amps=138 amps and LLC=1.6 mOhms.
    vCPU will rise depending on temps due to Thermal velocity Boost (this depends on the CPU multiplier, explained here):
    https://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?106375-MCE-explanations-and-others&highlight=explanations

    So even if we disable TVB so the VID is as if the CPU were at 100C, we get this at 138 amps:
    Vcore = 1100 + (138 * 1.6) - (138 * 1.6) +0mv offset = 1100mv= 1.1v

    So your desktop would be running at 0.879v while the laptop is running at 1.1v.

    That's why 0 of 16 9900K's passed this test.


    The only way to satisfy the OP's request is to set the desktop into "Offset mode", with a 0mv offset, and set AC Loadline to "Intel fail safe", which is 1.6 mOhms--or set AC Loadline manually to 1.6 mOhms or 160, and then you will be fine.

    The problem is, most desktops hide the "overclocking performance menu" from the user, preventing you from changing the CPU's VID. Laptops only use Serial VID. They have no access to the VRM controller, which is why you won't see "Loadline Calibration" on almost any laptop. Loadline calibration requires direct hardware access to the VRM itself. The Vcore you set on a laptop is VID.

    Your request won't work because laptops handle "override voltage" completely differently than desktops. Override voltage re-programs the VID and uses the AC Loadline. Desktops don't reprogram the VID. They access the voltage controller directly (in fixed vcore mode, Loadline calibration also accesses the controller directly).

    On your laptop, go into your BIOS and go to "Internal VR Settings"--> "Core I/A Domain" and set AC Loadline to "1" and then see what happens if you try setting a 1100mv "override" vcore at 4.5 ghz or 4.7 ghz. (This emulates desktops using Intel default loadline calibration), and most 9900k/KS chips will have a default VID of about 1100mv at 4.5 ghz. This may work at 4.5 ghz if your CPU is good enough, but it's going to be an instant BSOD at 4.7 ghz. Assuming you can load windows.

    On the eVGA Z390 dark, this is equal to either 75% or 100% "increased" vdroop loadline setting, depending on if they use a baseline of 2.1 or 1.6 mOhms for 100% vdroop.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2020
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