Chromebooks now get Microsoft Office

Discussion in 'Chrome OS and Software' started by Primes, Nov 23, 2017.

  1. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Prophet

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    This just proves that you're neither as smart nor as clever as you like to think you are. Go away.
     
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  2. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    I have a nice Umbrella of Clear Thinking - so for me it's another Sunny Day, full of Hope and Optimism.

    I'll leave the light on for you - in case you want to come in from the darkness and confusion surrounding you...o_O

    There are no Chromebooks here though, and no Chrome OS, it's the adult world where you no longer need training wheels on your computers.

    You can leave your child's toys behind, we're waiting for you, whenever you are ready. :confused::D:eek::)
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2017
  3. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Google set's the standard, right?

    So if Google is saying that the best Pixelbook for the masses is a $999 one, who are you to say differently?

    Every Chromebook cheaper isn't the standard, it's sub-standard, according to Google.

    I had an idea when the Chromebook idea first started, with Google putting out a laptop in "between" a phone and a full laptop OS, that Google was making a statement computer for education.

    Google would provide the entré into computing for the young in school masses.

    A bit like Apple with their impossibly limited UI on their phones and tablets, but actually more useful and more configurable.

    And, of course the next step after an entré into computers, would be real computers, made available to those students upon graduation.

    Now that Google has driven the price of Chromebooks up to $1000, and the price of phones has been driven up to $1000, into realm of the price for real computers, providing performance almost into the world of real computing.

    That time is now, it's time Google took the next step.

    (Android + Chrome OS) / Linux => Google GUI => "Shiny Metal Robot" computing for the next generation of adults, Google "Blender".

    And, of course "Blender" should run Microsoft Office, after all MS Office is what make's a laptop OS, a real OS. :D
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2017
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  4. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Prophet

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    All you have is a hypothetical scenario of some corporations possibly filtering content when when in reality, other corporations that you're shilling for are currently engaging in this practice. Why would it be wrong for Comcast to prioritize and filter traffic when Google, Facebook, Twitter, and others are filtering people and content who express political opinions to the right of Stalin?
     
  5. Mitlov

    Mitlov Shiny

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    That's not remotely how halo products work. When Acura and Lexus sell two-seat sports cars with six-figure price tags, they're not saying that $40k family hauling four doors are substandard.

    If you don't want a Chromebook, that's fine, don't buy one. But quit trolling random threads in the ChromeOS forum. I personally have no interest in Ubuntu but you don't see me posting demeaning, confrontational comments in an Ubuntu forum.
     
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  6. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Halo products aren't the right category for Chromebooks.

    Chromebooks were supposed to embody the desire for Netbooks for all, for education, for the low income groups needing computers around the world. Business use was supposed to help pay for them and lower the cost, not cause them to rise to ridiculous cost. $999 is ridiculous for what you are getting.

    Chromebooks were supposed to limit costly extra's - including things like MS Office, and offer only the core required for education without the cost of bundling Windows. Linux was used as the base for free software to keep the price down.

    I have had a long time interest in Android and Chrome OS moving toward a full implementation of Linux as the hardware would allow, and that's what I am conveying, not trolling, informing.

    Perspective is often lost over time, the long term vision lost, and I think that's what is going on with Android and Chrome OS, and are straying off from and losing their full potential.

    Strangely MS Office was a key release item for the 1st Chromebooks, and it's taken 6+ years to show up. I can't believe it's what Google have been waiting for before merging Chrome OS and Android, but if it is / was, then this is a key turning point toward the future. Let's not forget that future, and not stagnate making "expensive" inexpensive Chromebooks.

    Otherwise, the MS Office inclusion in Chrome OS is just incredibly late to market, and still an odd add-on for an inexpensive laptop for education.

    In the between times, I worry about Google mis-using their control over the environments they create, and the hidden motives behind creating them.
    Chromebook
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromebook

    "In April 2017, the Electronic Frontier Foundation accused Google of using Chromebooks to collect and data mine "school children's personal information, including their Internet searches", without their parents' consent, two years after EFF filed a federal complaint against the company."

    EFF Says Google Chromebooks Are Still Spying on Students
    In the past two years since a formal complaint was made against Google, not much has changed in the way Google handle's this.
    http://news.softpedia.com/news/eff-says-google-chromebooks-are-still-spying-on-students-515015.shtml
    "Google still hasn't shed its "bad guy" clothes when it comes to the data it collects on underage students. In fact, the Electronic Frontier Foundation says the company continues to massively collect and store information on children without their consent or their parents'. Not even school administrators fully understand the extent of this operation, the EFF says. "

    "This isn't the first time the EFF has had something to say against Google on this topic. In fact, two years ago, it even filed a federal complaint against the company, alleging that it was "collecting and data mining school children's personal information, including their Internet searches."

    According to the latest status report from the EFF, Google is still up to no good, trying to eliminate students' privacy without their parent's notice or consent and "without a real choice to opt out." This, they say, is done via the Chromebooks Google is selling to schools across the United States.

    "Educational technology services often collect far more information on kids than is necessary and store this information indefinitely," the EFF said."
    Invasion of privacy and information gathering may be the real motivations behind Google getting inexpensive Chromebooks into the hands of school children.

    But, what is the motivation for creating a $999 Chromebook? What kind of exploitation does that embody? Taking money from graduates, creating a Halo around Chromebooks that just doesn't fit?

    Does finally getting MS Office into Chrome OS really justify $999 Chromebooks?
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2017
  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    This isn't the right thread for that discussion, nor was where you originally posted it. I included your comments to show the mood you seem to be in, contravening every reasonable viewpoint on every subject. :(

    It's an important topic though, so if you want to start a new thread to vent your disagreement with every thinking internet netizen, I'm sure it will draw interest. :)
     
  8. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Microsoft is flailing with Android app support on Chromebooks
    [Update: The saga continues]
    Something really strange is happening with Microsoft's Office Android apps on Chromebooks, and it isn't serving anyone well.
    https://www.computerworld.com/artic...microsoft-office-android-apps-chromebook.html

    "These days, Microsoft is supposedly all about services — about getting you to use and subscribe to its software, regardless of what platform you prefer.

    That's why it's especially hard to understand the convoluted mess the company's creating with its Android Office apps and their wildly inconsistent support on Chromebooks.

    Let me back up for a minute: Last week, I published a guide to the essential Android apps for Chromebooks. Google officially took the beta label off its Play Store on Chrome OS effort with the launch of its Pixelbook this month — a change visible not just on the Pixelbook but on any Chromebook with Play Store access — and that seemed like a fine time to assess which Android apps actually enhance the Chrome OS experience in a meaningful way.

    Not surprisingly, several Microsoft titles made the list — ranging from the core Android Office apps to Outlook and OneNote. I tested them all on both the Pixelbook and the Asus Chromebook Flip C302CA, and they installed without issue and ran like a charm.

    Then, after the story went live, weird things started happening."
    "First, numerous readers reached out to tell me they were unable to install some or all of the Microsoft Android apps on their ownChromebook devices — fully Play-Store-supported systems like Samsung's Chromebook Pro and Plus, Google's second-gen Chromebook Pixel, and Acer's Chromebook 14 for Work. Some folks couldn't install any of the Microsoft apps, while others could install some of the titles but not others (with baffling combinations, too, like on the aforementioned Acer system — which apparently allows users to install Word, Excel, and Outlook but not PowerPoint or OneNote).

    Then something even stranger happened: Someone told me they'd had the core Office apps installed and running on the Chromebook Flip C302CA, just as I did — but when they uninstalled one of the apps by mistake, they realized they couldn't reinstall it. The app was now flagged as being "incompatible" with their laptop.

    Since its launch this summer, the Chromebook Flip C302CA is suddenly and inexplicably now "incompatible" with Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. The Play Store won't even show them if you search from the device itself and won't let you install them if you try pulling them up from an external browser window."

    "Digging deeper into Microsoft's Chromebook chaos
    If all of this sounds oddly familiar, it should. As it turns out, similarly strange things started happening with Microsoft's Android Office apps and Chromebooks last November. Back then, a Microsoft spokesperson explained it thusly:

    Our strategy has not changed. Office for Android is supported on Chrome OS devices via the Google Play Store. While Google Play on Chrome OS is in beta, we are partnering with Google to deliver the best experience for Chromebook users and plan to make the apps available on all compatible devices by general availability.

    Well, guess what? It's been a year. Google Play on Chrome OS is now out of beta. Yet the shenanigans continue.

    Here's the most bewildering part of all: Having its Android Office apps broadly available across Chrome OS would ostensibly be a positive thing for Microsoft — something that'd fit perfectly into its current plan of pursuing service-oriented users across all platforms. The company has even configured its apps to be fully functional only for users with active Office 365 subscriptions on devices with 10.1-in. screens or bigger, which includes almost all Chromebooks.
    So in other words, no one's getting any freebies. If anything, the apps' availability on Chrome OS would only serve as an extra incentive for people to subscribe — because such a subscription would bring the full native Office experience to a Chromebook device.
    And lest you think this whole scenario is in any way normal, I've yet to encounter a single other Android app that has device-specific restrictions for Chromebook compatibility. In my experience, if an app works with Chrome OS — which most do, aside from titles that inherently require phone-specific hardware or environments to operate — then it works with any Play-Store-supporting Chromebook. This arbitrarily evolving mixed-bag approach is both unusual and illogical. It creates a poor and confusing experience for users and makes Microsoft look — well, I'll let you fill in that blank.
    I asked Google if it had any insight into what was going on with this situation, since it was supposedly "partnering" with Microsoft to work on these apps during the Play Store beta period last year. A spokesperson sent me the following statement:

    We want to ensure that customers have access to their favorite apps and games on all Chromebooks, through Google Play. We hope to continue to work with Microsoft to make Office available on all other Chromebooks soon.

    "We hope." Hmm.
    I've contacted Microsoft and followed up multiple times throughout the week to try to get an explanation. If/when I receive any further info about what's happening or when it might be resolved, I'll update this page with details.

    In the meantime, if you're looking for a desktop-caliber and Office-compatible editing suite for your Chromebook — beyond what's available in a web-based program like Google Docs or Microsoft's own limited Office Online offering — your best bet is to go with a third-party Android Office alternative like OfficeSuite Pro.

    And if you are able to install Microsoft's Android Office apps on your Chromebook now, for the love of Goog, hang onto 'em. Avoid uninstalling the programs or resetting your device at all costs — because as Microsoft continues to remind us, it can't currently be counted on for consistency.

    UPDATE (11/27/17): It appears someone flipped a switch over the Thanksgiving weekend, as numerous users are now reporting broader compatibility with Office Android apps across multiple Chromebook models. As I said on social media, though, it's hard to give much kudos here, given how drawn-out this process has been and how much silence and silliness has been involved. And despite the new progress, some Office apps still seem to be showing up as incompatibleon some devices, for no apparent reason.
    But hey, some progress is better than no progress, right?!
     
  9. Mitlov

    Mitlov Shiny

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    Did you really just type "This isn't the right thread for that discussion" after posting pages of rants about the price of the Google PixelBook in a thread that's not about the Google PixelBook, but instead MS Office on ChromeOS?
     
  10. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    No, you need to slow down and read for comprehension :)

    Look at what I was replying to:
    He was talking about Net Neutrality, not Pixelbooks or Chromebook's.

    My comments were right on the mark, and not OT at all.

    Net Neutrality is totally OT, not related, and shouldn't be discussed here, and I suggested he start a new thread as that would be a good discussion to have, especially since he is way off base from what most people want. He also has started discussing this as OT in another thread, so I wanted to head him off.

    We are in a Google Chromebook discussion, Microsoft Android Apps delivering Microsoft Office apps on Chrome OS are in fact merging the two OS functionalities, and that begs the question in everyone's mind since Chrome OS was released, why 2 OS's?, and why not integrate both on a Full Linux OS, and actually compete with a full OS against MS and Apple.

    Earn that $1000 unit price, otherwise what's the point of such a high cost?

    Very much the important questions that fall out from adding Google Play support from Android integrating with Chrome OS, to deliver Microsoft Office apps.

    You can argue as much as you like that they are not the same, but they are, and merging is what is already happening. In fact without merging Android apps into Chrome OS there would be no Microsoft Office applications available on Chrome OS. :)

    Pricing is key to the merging question. Chromebooks were always supposed to be inexpensive laptops for education first, and that has been the major focus of the market.

    Microsoft Office apps, full function requires $$$ and you will likely not see the primary and secondary school usage of Chromebooks use MS Office paid app services, it's too expensive. Price here is again important.

    With the $999 priced Pixelbook heralding the availability of Microsoft Office apps through the Android Google Play Store, the cost has gone through the roof on Chromebooks, and that needs mentioning in parallel with the release of the Android Google Play MS Office apps.

    And, now that the pricing has hit $1000 for Chromebooks and Android phones, it's the perfect time to talk about full merging of the OS's, and putting them on a real full OS, a full port of Linux.

    I know these are complex interactions and concepts to see, so I don't blame you, but it's all related, all related news that comes out together at the same time through the same outlet, and needs to be discussed as such. Along with information on how the roll-out for Microsoft Office apps on the Android Google Play Store for Chrome OS is a bit rocky right now.

    Instead of complaining, be helpful and post useful stuff, like me :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2017
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