Centrino

Discussion in 'What Notebook Should I Buy?' started by nick17, Dec 29, 2003.

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  1. nick17

    nick17 Newbie

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    Hi all. I am considering buying a new laptop and am curious about some things. Should I make sure and buy one with the intel centrino? I imagine it will be more widely used as time goes. Does this make sense?

    Thanks
     
  2. Brian

    Brian Working at 486 Speed NBR Reviewer

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    Centrino means nothing more than a configuration with Intel motherboard, wireles B card and processor. It's really marketing more than anything else. I would encourage people to not get Centrino because it limits you to 802.11b. Most manufacturers offer 802.11g configurations which are much faster (almost 5 times) than B.

    Brian

    Editor in Chief http://www.bargainPDA.com and http://www.SPOTstop.com
     
  3. nick17

    nick17 Newbie

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    So, in considering a Dell laptop....I should not give weight to laptop's with Centrino technology. I like to buy things that will at least be compatible with future technology. So, should most areas be wireless in the future, I would want the laptop I buy now to be able to work with that technology. See what I'm saying?
     
  4. Andrew Baxter

    Andrew Baxter -

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    what you would really want in a laptop is one that has integrated wi-fi that is compatible with both 802.11b and 802.11g, Centrino would be compatible with 802.11b but not 802.11g. Right now the most widely used type of wireless is 802.11b so you could be sure you'll be compatible with most any wireless network if you have Centrino, but in a couple of years we might see quite a lot of 802.11g networks. You can always buy a card to put in your laptop that will give you 802.11g compatibility, but if you can it would be nice to get a laptop now that works on both standards...so in answer to your question "yes" you should look past the Centrino marketing and just see the technology for what it is.
     
  5. Brian

    Brian Working at 486 Speed NBR Reviewer

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    Right...in fact you can buy laptops with 802.11b that are not Centrino based. Again...Centrino is just a marketing term more than anything else. I suggest getting 802.11g, as it's faster (if you have a g router) and also works with b routers.

    Editor in Chief http://www.bargainPDA.com and http://www.SPOTstop.com
     
  6. gracie

    gracie Newbie

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    <blockquote id='quote'>quote:<hr height='1' noshade id='quote'>Originally posted by abaxter

     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2015
  7. Brian

    Brian Working at 486 Speed NBR Reviewer

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    Almost all of them do, as does Dell. You'll notice an option with Dell to add an A+B+G card, which covers all popular formats.

    Brian

    Editor in Chief http://www.bargainPDA.com and http://www.SPOTstop.com
     
  8. gracie

    gracie Newbie

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    <blockquote id='quote'>quote:<hr height='1' noshade id='quote'>Originally posted by Brian

     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2015
  9. Andrew Baxter

    Andrew Baxter -

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    gracie, the Dell TrueMobile 1400 covers all the bases for current and future wi-fi standards, it's likely the most expensive option but it won't become obsolete.

    802.11b is the current standard, 802.11g is basically a faster version of 802.11b (an 802.11b card will actually receive from an 802.11g wi-fi access point, but it won't fully utilize the speed available). 802.11a is being pushed by some because it creates less interference but it is not compatible with 802.11b or g cards.

    here's a great article (a little old but still pertinent) covering all this:

    http://www.wi-fiplanet.com/tutorials/article.php/1009431
     
  10. Brian

    Brian Working at 486 Speed NBR Reviewer

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    Andrew is right. If I'm you, I would pick up the TM 1400 if it fits in your budget and then get an ABG router for home. If this is too expensive get the TM 1300 and a G router. I just picked up a Netgear G router for $50 after rebates.

    Brian

    Editor in Chief http://www.bargainPDA.com and http://www.SPOTstop.com
     
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