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Can someone in my home network hack into my computer?

Discussion in 'Windows OS and Software' started by nanotech, Aug 17, 2011.

  1. AppleUsr

    AppleUsr Notebook Deity

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    I get a firefox warning flag that flags that https everywhere site as bad juju. i wouldnt use that if firefox specifically blocks it
     
  2. Steven

    Steven God Amongst Mere Mortals

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    Use HTTPS everywhere as another user has stated and you should be fairly safe.
     
  3. Bog

    Bog Losing it...

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    If you have an untrusted user on your home network you have bigger problems to worry about besides hacking. Ensure the following:
    - they have no physical access to the computer
    - make sure they have no access to the access point
    - use strong passwords
    - disable file sharing
    - ask him, "excuse me, wt* are you doing?"
     
  4. chimpanzee

    chimpanzee Notebook Virtuoso

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  5. tuηay

    tuηay o TuNaY o

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  6. chimpanzee

    chimpanzee Notebook Virtuoso

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    I would be surprised if it does work.
     
  7. tuηay

    tuηay o TuNaY o

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    this. :D

    10. Char.
     
  8. ikovac

    ikovac Cooler and faster... NBR Reviewer

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    A few important things:
    1. Being in a "Home" network doesn't always mean you LIVE with other people that want to see your stuff.
    2. "Public" doesn't save you from spying on your network traffic.

    Explanation:
    You move into new flat, and all around is full of free open flat Internet wireless right? I noticed that many times. Especially when people around you have IPTV and have unlimited data rates, they leave open wireless. You connect, get an IP from their DHCP on their router, and a gateway for internet. You are happy :).

    You are actually so happy that you forget to answer "Public" when Windows asks (I am sure many people will understand Windows question as "Where are you?" and answer "HOME"!:)). You are now exposed, visible, reachable.

    Now in the best case (when you choose "Public") you at least don't share anything (except Public folder). But you still are a part of the other network and all computers can come to you. And can ping you. And can test your firewall. And can monitor your traffic without you noticing. And can find a hole somewhere. And can reveal your passwords/habits/visited sites/dirty pics etc... that are sent through their network.

    The only thing that can protect/save/hide your traffic is VPN (https sites also are safe but VPN hides ALL your traffic + your IP online is hidden/changed so even the legitimate serving site thinks you are someone else). Either use a free one like OpenVPN, Hotspot Shield or TorVPN or you pay and get much better speeds and traffic.

    I hope it helps.

    PS If I was a bad guy I would fish for guys who want free internet by using an Open wireless giving them free ride on Internet and by that time do whatever I want with their computers!
     
  9. tuηay

    tuηay o TuNaY o

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    What do you think about a anti virus program? I'm using Kaspersky Internet Security, and it does ask when other apps want acces to internet. How safe will you consider that? I'm starting to be paranoid after reading everything here :D
     
  10. Hungry Man

    Hungry Man Notebook Virtuoso

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    Not all sites have https, but it's something.
     
  11. ikovac

    ikovac Cooler and faster... NBR Reviewer

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    1. Antivirus can save you if someone wants to breach in your computer (from your network card inside)
    2. It will not prevent attacker reading your shares, but probably will if he wants to leave something malicious on your system
    3. It will not solve the problem when someone can read your traffic once it leaves your computer.

    The point is that antivirus cannot check your traffic once it leaves your network card. It is like guards inside the fortress. VPN is like armored tunnel from inside your fortress to another fortress. :)

    Don't be paranoid, just learn how things work and use simple tools. All is easily available.
     
  12. ikovac

    ikovac Cooler and faster... NBR Reviewer

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    It is a good solution if you can use it (much easier than VPN). But it depends on site that must initiate https and not you.

    What worries me is that I recently bought a couple of games from Gamersgate (Metro2033 and Witcher for 8 USD or something) and that site despite it requires you to log in doesn't use https! And it stores game keys, some kind of points and other info. I paid through Paypal and it uses https (of course). That is the first time I saw a legal site that sells stuff doesn't use https.

    It is very risky in my opinion.

    try it for yourself - go to Gamersgate.com And it will not have https nor little lock sign. Now login. No https, no lock sign. Now go to your game and reveal your game key. No https no lock sign. So I haven't checked other ways of protection they could use, but somehow I don't like it.

    They say this:
    Security
    GamersGate has taken steps to ensure that the personally identifiable information it collects is secure, including employing electronic security systems and password protections designed to guard against unauthorized access.

    Perhaps once they put your data into their database? Hm. :(


    EDIT: I checked their code - they build https and ssl links in javascript. So it is ok :eek:
     
  13. tuηay

    tuηay o TuNaY o

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    I see. I consider my self as safe however, I have a strong WiFi password like with uppercase and lowerase and numbers. Also, I have everything 'shared' off. (from network settings) I also sometimes check my ruter of anyone else that I don't know is connected or not.. Ugh, also use sites like facebook with https.
     
  14. ikovac

    ikovac Cooler and faster... NBR Reviewer

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    You are ok on your wireless (make sure to use WPA2 if you can). The question is when you join someone elses ("open" or "free") or you don't trust other people in the network.
     

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