C: drive vs D:drive

Discussion in 'Windows OS and Software' started by Lesl, Apr 15, 2018.

  1. Lesl

    Lesl Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    17
    Messages:
    148
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    30
    In the past I had 2 laptops that did stop working and to put them back at work I had to do a clean install ( or something like that) . My C:drive had to be wipe out. When this did happen for a second times, I did conclude that saving files to My Pictures , My videos or My documents was dangerous because if anything go wrong, the C:drive has to be wipe out. So, I did start saving all my files on the D:drive so I wouldn't lose them. On those 2 laptops, the C:drive was like 25 % of the space available and the D:drive about 75%. Now, I just bought a used HP Pavillion 15 and...my D:drive is only 20 GB and 2 GB of this is for the Recovery file but my C:drive is 908 GB. How come the C:drive is so big and could it be shrink to move most of the space for the D: drive? That laptop use Windows 8.1. Is there a partition tool directly from it? Thanks!
     
  2. toughasnails

    toughasnails Toughbook Moderator Moderator

    Reputations:
    2,034
    Messages:
    5,936
    Likes Received:
    1,002
    Trophy Points:
    331
    Yes there is software out there but really why do it ? If something happens to your HDD in your laptop you are going to most likely lose everything anyways. Why not buy a external HDD. You can get a 1TB or even a 2TB for under $50.00-$65.00 for all your pictures, movies or what ever so if the HDD in the laptop dies your files are safe on the external drive. I keep everything backed up on my external drives (3)
     
    Ultra Male likes this.
  3. SL2

    SL2 Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    807
    Messages:
    1,273
    Likes Received:
    223
    Trophy Points:
    81
    There is, but IIRC it's not helpful in your situation. You can shrink C: by using it, but the empty space you'll get will not be next to D: and thus not a good idea.

    Try this.
    https://www.easeus.com/partition-manager/epm-free.html

    Also, changing the default folders for My Pictures etc is extremely easy by using the right mouse button, or cut/paste.
    Just make sure your protected operating system files are hidden before you do it.

    See link.
    http://forum.notebookreview.com/threads/to-partition-or-not.790676/#post-10242312
     
  4. Lesl

    Lesl Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    17
    Messages:
    148
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    30
    Thanks! I did shrink the C:drive using easeUS tool and then I did rename the unallocated partition ( F). I didn't play at all with the D partition. The only thing curious is... I can't change the size of the thumbnail of the " My pictures" folder I did drop in the F: drive. It's stuck to " listing" and if I click where you normally do to change the size, the word "unspecified" shows.
    I did manage to change the size of the thumbnail.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2018
  5. StormJumper

    StormJumper Notebook Virtuoso

    Reputations:
    502
    Messages:
    3,183
    Likes Received:
    382
    Trophy Points:
    151
    From what I am reading if you really want to backup your files/data don't store it on the D: drive especially if it is on the same drive. If C: crashing it will take out the D: drive as well unless you laptop has two HDD then the D: will be safe and separate but most only come with one Drive. So your best option is a ext HDD since they come up to 4tb for storage and that would be better to save your data to the ext. drive.
     
    tijo and toughasnails like this.
  6. Aivxtla

    Aivxtla Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    114
    Messages:
    231
    Likes Received:
    297
    Trophy Points:
    76
    You can resize partitions from Windows itself using the Disk Management utility in Control Panel. Also most times if Windows crashes the partitions will be intact. So no just because your OS fails does not mean that the partitions will be gone. I used to do what you do with dual partitions a lot as I used to reinstall Windows or experiment with Linux all the while my second partition would be untouched. Also if you truly need a proper back don’t buy a huge external drive as that means if that fails all your data is gone at once. A cheap dual bay NAS with Raid 1 is a much better investment. You can in turn have that backed up to an external drive as a precaution.

    Also delete the recovery partition, you can just do a fresh Windows install since the liscence is built into the bios. Just use the Windows Media Creation tool to create a bootable Windows USB or DVD. The default recovery is usually OEM Windows with vendor bloatware added, that’s why on any new laptop I do a fresh Windows install and remove the recovery partition and keep a copy of Windows on a USB drive.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2018
  7. StormJumper

    StormJumper Notebook Virtuoso

    Reputations:
    502
    Messages:
    3,183
    Likes Received:
    382
    Trophy Points:
    151
    You can partition all you want but that will not work if the Drive crashes everything will be gone. So let this be a warning offload your data/files to ext HDD or USB drive to prevent data loss.
     
    toughasnails likes this.
  8. Aivxtla

    Aivxtla Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    114
    Messages:
    231
    Likes Received:
    297
    Trophy Points:
    76
    If the logical C drive fails nothing happens to data on the other logical drive. You simply reformat C drive and reinstall Windows. I have done that many times. But yeah if the hard disk as a whole fails then you will lose everything so backup is still a good idea. You can still recover data from failing drives with specialized tools which I have done buts it’s a pain.

    Another reason I say get a NAS is bitrot, which means bit flip between 1 and 0 with can cause saved photos etc to get corrupted. A decent NAS will have bitrot protection. At least with RAID 1 you can absorb the loss of a drive without losing data. You still want to back that up to an external drive in case the raid controller fails but data would still be intact even then as the drives would still be ok.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2018
  9. toughasnails

    toughasnails Toughbook Moderator Moderator

    Reputations:
    2,034
    Messages:
    5,936
    Likes Received:
    1,002
    Trophy Points:
    331
    And I agree with that. I have spent many hours recovering data off of dead drivers before and never again. Spend the $60.00 for a external drive. You will thank us one of these days.
     
    Aivxtla likes this.
  10. SL2

    SL2 Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    807
    Messages:
    1,273
    Likes Received:
    223
    Trophy Points:
    81
    Yes, but it doesn't help the OP like I explanied above.

    Edit: Maybe it would have, I was actually thinking about the classical expand C: problem; the leftover from the shrunken D: ends up in the wrong place. This would probably not be a problem if you want to shrink C:
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Apr 22, 2018
Loading...

Share This Page