Building a network for my house/workshops

Discussion in 'Networking and Wireless' started by kojack, Sep 1, 2020.

  1. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    36
    Messages:
    124
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    41
    Internet <> Router <> Pod Base + pod + pod + pod + pod
    <> Ethernet to garage (length of this will determine throughput as well) <> AP (should cover shop + garage)

    I did find a nice AP though that is AX and reasonably priced NWA210AX - ($269) this one supports up to 2.5.gbps ethernet while the NWA110AX supports 1gbps ethernet for cheaper.($150)..... Standalone operability is nice to have when you don't want to deal with recurring license fees as you would in an enterprise environment.
     
  2. kojack

    kojack Notebook Virtuoso

    Reputations:
    906
    Messages:
    3,552
    Likes Received:
    1,253
    Trophy Points:
    231
    Cool. Thanks. I have put an order in to Bell Canada for their new Gigabit fibe service. I am sick of this Rogers garbage ignite system. 5-10 times a day I lose service. The rest of the time I am getting slow junky speeds from it. Time to move on. I have 2 of 3 new emails set up. I just have to setup my son's new email on his computer now. Then we are a freakin gone from the 7 months of hell with rogers!
     
    alexhawker likes this.
  3. kojack

    kojack Notebook Virtuoso

    Reputations:
    906
    Messages:
    3,552
    Likes Received:
    1,253
    Trophy Points:
    231
    Another question, Using the bell wifi system can I just run extenders off of that signal around the house, and still get fast speeds?

    I am looking at this one.
    https://www.tp-link.com/ca/home-networking/range-extender/re650/

    Also, can I plug a hardwire into this and have it transmit my wifi via that cable? Say to feed another router elsewhere?
     
  4. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    36
    Messages:
    124
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    41
    If you want ultimate speeds and coverage it's better to use an AP or repurpose old routers as AP's to extend a signal since "extenders" cut your speed in 1/2 to communicate between each other unless you find a 3-band that uses the 3rd band as a backhaul for data.

    The ports on extenders typically act as an additional LAN port for end devices. So, let's say your "Modem" w/ wifi is AC your highest bandwidth typically is 866.7mbps unless it's rated higher. Effectively you get knocked down to 433mbps by using an extender to add more coverage. If you used an AP you maintain the 866mbps connectivity throughout the house.

    The RE650 appears to work a bit differently as it provides it's own AP if you plug in the Ethernet to the main router otherwise you would end up losing speed.

    It looks like those are selling for ~$120/ea

    $80 - NWA1123-ACv2
    $82 - MikroTik wAP
    $168 - EWS360AP
    (not an exhaustive list)

    $80 - 4-port POE injector

    These might provide better coverage as they're more enterprise oriented. The issue with them tends to be whether or not you have POE or not. If you opt to not splurge for POE on either a switch or injector you can typically add a AC adapter to the mix for about $10 to power them. Most say mount them on a ceiling but you can put them anywhere you want whether a shelf somewhere or mount them on a wall.

    You want to look at the antenna setup as they're listed as 2x2 3x3 4x4 or some extreme setups go to 8x8. You see better coverage / speeds with more antennae but some are able to put out more mw than others.

    When you step it up to a decent AP you need less of them for good coverage vs the consumer options and they last longer.

    It all kind of depends on planning your overhaul for future expansion / upgrades. You could go a bit more high end in the spots you use devices the most often and then throw in the extenders in lesser used areas. You could do high end everywhere to simplify roaming within the house. You could use the extender only out in the garage / workshop and upgrade the main house.

    I would aim for the best bang for the buck but at the same time I tend to push the limits with the WAN side at 1gbps but, if you're running a NAS then the internal speeds make a difference more so than the outside. If you're streaming internal media from a nas/server good link speed / coverage helps for a smooth experience.
     
  5. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    36
    Messages:
    124
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    41
    I had an alert pop from Amazon for a POE switch for $59.... so, you could go that route over a POE injector for cheaper as well. The only issue with some of these are that say you get a 5-8 port switch for the AP's but the switch only provides 65W of power that limits you to 2-3 AP's depending on the power draw needed for the AP's to use. If it's insufficient the AP's tend to reboot due to lack of sufficient power.
     
  6. kojack

    kojack Notebook Virtuoso

    Reputations:
    906
    Messages:
    3,552
    Likes Received:
    1,253
    Trophy Points:
    231
    Well, Bell's fibre optic system is now installed into my home. at the gate, I am getting 950 up / down speeds. I am using speedtest and it's stating around 180 down and 400 plus up. That reading is weird as my pages and content load instantly where as on rogers, it was sluggish and slow. On my roku using rogers wireless show's would be pixelated for the first minute or so, now, it's instant high def with no lag at all. Same goes for my websites. It's just so much faster.
     
  7. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    36
    Messages:
    124
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    41
    180/400 seems a bit odd as they normally would be reversed.

    I would test it connected with a cable directly where it comes in before even hitting your router. Then I would test through the router and compare the results to see if the router is a bottleneck.

    In the past I've had routers w/ gig ports only test out at 250mbps and replacing / bypassing them proved the issue was in the router.

    If it's time for a new router I have one for sale on ebay right now....
     
  8. Aivxtla

    Aivxtla Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    512
    Messages:
    531
    Likes Received:
    706
    Trophy Points:
    106
    Test wired and let us know if you get similar uneven results. A few reasons I can think of why this can happen, I’m sure others can think of more or better ones:

    Router: Cut Through Forwarding (CTF) / Packet Acceleration may be disabled due to things like traffic stats, QoS and in some cases even PPPoE being used on some older models especially on Broadcom based ones. Newer models I think have CTF active even with those features active. With CTF disabled the like of the Netgear R7000, Asus AC86U, AC3100U etc can have peak speeds drop to like the 300-500 range on the WAN side.

    ISP: I know CenturyLink here in the states has issues like this in Fiber when too many people on the same node at using large amounts of downlink bandwidth and you can end up with uploads being much faster than downloads.

    Other: Wireless AP / Client compatibility or driver issues, and other causes I’m sure others can list.

    If it’s consistent even in wired tests it may be ISP fiber node being saturated or a hardware acceleration issue router side. Also test with QoS off if currently enabled just to rule it out.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2020
  9. kojack

    kojack Notebook Virtuoso

    Reputations:
    906
    Messages:
    3,552
    Likes Received:
    1,253
    Trophy Points:
    231
    I am going to contact bell this week once I get my account all setup on their website. Just to ask some setup questions regarding it. I was getting similar speeds on rogers, but it was SOOOOOOO much slower. Everything now is instant.
     
Loading...

Share This Page