BSEL Mod on a socket P explained with photos

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by naton, Jun 16, 2009.

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  1. moral hazard

    moral hazard Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    I've got a similar thing on my msi notebook, press the turbo button and the FSB changes (depending on 2 pll registers it will change differently).

    Normally it's a 15% OC, but if I change the pll registers I can get as high or low as I want.

    I don't know how it works.

    I thought it would be in the 1B module, but I'm not sure.

    I tried to follow this:
    http://www.wimsbios.com/forum/topic9388-225.html#p55578

    But I didn't really get anywhere with it.
     
  2. moral hazard

    moral hazard Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    I would guess that the test pins might do something useful:
    http://forum.notebookreview.com/har...-test-pins-socket-p-cpus-what-do-they-do.html

    Or other reserved pins.

    If you try any test pin mod, please share the results.

    I was going to test it myself, but I only have one notebook right now so I don't want to risk it.
     
  3. naton

    naton Notebook Virtuoso

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    Thanks for the Win BIOS link. I downloaded the thread so I can read it at home.

    mind telling me more about the pll register... are you using setFSB to change it?

    From my understanding reserved pin are not in use. Intel left them in the CPU for future revesions.

    I think it's time to start reading about CPU architecture so one can figure out what are most of the pins for. For instance, I don't understance what's the purpose of the BCLK pins since the CPU FSB in controlled by the BSEL pins. I know there is a relationship between them but I can't figure it out :)

    Edit:
    I don't think that the Test1 to Test7 pin are those that control the multipliers. In the picture listed in your link it says that they can be left unconnected. I think they mean that the holes in the CPU socket can be left inconnected. I think those I used by intel to test and possibly benchmark CPUs in the production chain...
    The above is only a guess :)
     
  4. moral hazard

    moral hazard Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    In an old bios, I had the option to change the overclock from 15% to 20%.
    When I did that, I noticed 2 pll registers changed (checked with setfsb using the diagnosis tab).

    Then I decided to try changing them myself, to see if I could get a larger OC.

    Here is how:
    http://forum.notebookreview.com/msi...-but-should-work-all-similar.html#post6374066

    The overclock happens in two steps, first it jumps to the % in register 25, then a second jump to the higher % in register 23.

    If you add 1 to the hex value, the overclock will be ~4% higher. If you take 1 away from the hex value, you go down ~4%.

    I got a really good OC, it's more stable than if I overclock the normal way with setfsb.

    Those pins just look a bit interesting to me, more than the rest.

    Sure they may be not connected to the motherboard, but I wonder what would happen if you connect them to GND or Vdd. They in fact are right next to GND and Vdd, so the pinmod would be very easy.

    There has got to be some pinmod that would unlock the multiplier. I thought about buying a cheap notebook off ebay to test with, but I'm getting a pretty good OC on the FSB, don't really need to increase the multi.
     
  5. pipkata

    pipkata Newbie

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  6. heinz2005

    heinz2005 Notebook Geek

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    Undervolting arrandale (i3/i5/i7) with software is not possible yet.
    Also for many other CPUs minimal voltages are disabled by Intel.
    I am interested in the true minimal voltage of my new 32nm-i7-640m. (!)

    In 2008 I did some research about minimal voltages on differnt Notebook CPUs with rmclock.
    [​IMG]

    In 2009 I did some reseach on optimizing thermal compounds for notebooks.
    Quiet and Cool. Thermal paste replaced! 38@idle 73@load

    And I did some basic research on voltage pinmods.
    Core2Duo T5250 (and the same) hardware voltmod(undervolting) !? [1] - RightMark Forums

    Now I found additional information on an Intel VID override Circuit.
    [​IMG]
    Source: http://download.intel.com/design/chipsets/embedded/323094.pdf

    The Solution: The "official" Intel "VID override circuit" may help for an propper pinmod with respect to the signal-IOs
    and by the way avoiding the risk of shortcutting the signal drivers.

    From Intel-datasheet (i7=Arrandale 32nm):
    VID[5:3] and VID[2:0] are bidirectional.
    As an input, they are CSC[2:0] and MSID[2:0] respectively.“
    Source: download.intel.com/design/processor/datashts/322812.pdf
    So these inputs combined with the pinmod can affect the boot-sequence by giving wrong signals to the CPU
    (at least at i7-Arrandales, but probably also for Penryns etc.).

    CSC[2:0]/VID[5:3] - Current Sense
    Configuration bits, for ISENSE gain setting.
    This value is latched on the rising edge of
    VTTPWRGOOD.
    MSID[2:0]/VID[2:0]- Market Segment
    Identification is used to indicate the
    maximum platform capability to the
    processor. A processor will only boot if the
    MSID[2:0] pins are strapped to the
    appropriate setting (or higher) on the
    platform (see “Market Segment Selection
    Truth Table for MSID[2:0]” on page 88
    for MSID encodings). MSID is used to help
    protect the platform by preventing a higher
    power processor from booting in a platform
    designed for lower power processors.
    MSID[2:0] are latched on the rising edge of
    VTTPWRGOOD.

    Several of the VID signals (VID[5:3]/CSC[2:0] and VID[2:0]/MSID[2:0]) serve a dual
    purpose and are sampled during reset. Refer to the signal description table in
    Chapter 6 for more information.

    Maybe a small circuit can be build for flexible overriding the VID of actual Intel CPUs
    e.g. by a combination with a flash EEPROM?
    VID-Input to Address lines and Data lines to VID-output.
     
  7. Ender28

    Ender28 Newbie

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    Hi guys,

    I have a P7350 in my notebook, i would take the t6600 from my brother could i overclock it then? if yes can you discribe how pls? ( sorry for my bad english )
     
  8. niffcreature

    niffcreature ex computer dyke

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    If you are thinking of trying to make it go from 11x200mhz=2.2ghz to 11x266mhz=2.9ghz, no this is not possible. It will downclock to 1.6ghz.
     
  9. moral hazard

    moral hazard Notebook Nobel Laureate

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  10. Ender28

    Ender28 Newbie

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    my pll isn't support by set fsb and clock gen, i need a pin mod. Can you explain me why it wouldnt work with 266 ? and could anybody help me.
     
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