BLACK LIST. Adjustable voltage control/turbo ratio limits are locked out due latest Win Update/Bios

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Papusan, Dec 24, 2019.

  1. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKs Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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    Before or later you'll get it.

    Be you sure... You risk get a new one (update) right after you got the help from some with the SPI programmer. + Microsoft push 2 main Updates each year. And one thing for sure... Micro$lope won't help you with a new MB.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2019
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  2. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    upload_2019-12-30_20-28-37.png
    Now, there's a new built-in vulnerability just begging for a hacker to exploit it.
    [​IMG]
    Can you spell "rootkit" boys and girls?
     
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  3. Robbo99999

    Robbo99999 Notebook Prophet

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    I don't think this is gonna be a blanket lock on voltage regulation for all systems, I think that would cause an uproar, I think a lot of people have their CPUs overclocked - basically all enthusiasts that have a K series processor (probably 80%+ of people that own K series CPUs at a guess). My guess is that it will be an optional update of the opt-in variety rather than of the opt-out variety - so I think they'll communicate that as clearly as possible along with the optional updates. There are already security vulnerabilities out there related to the Spectre vulnerability that are not patched by default, and actually have to be "opt-in" by the administrator of the machine, I think in this case there was a number of relatively complicated steps that you need to do in order to activate the protection for this vulnerability (sorry, I can't remember the specific branch or name of it, but it's one of the Spectre vulnerabilities). So I think this voltage regulation vulnerability is gonna come under that same umbrella unless the risk of attack & exploitation of this vulnerability is of a higher level, (which I don't think it is).
     
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  4. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    I think you're probably right about both things. Intel is anything but stupid. They are not going to bite the hand that feeds them. And, I think you're right about overclocking being far more common than the people that say they don't care would like to think. I'd say the people that own unlocked processors that do not overclock them are a small minority. And, I would say the turdbook owners (including those that do not have unlocked processors) that do not undervolt are an exception to the norm, and that includes those that do not care about or think it is somehow a bad thing to overclock. The necessity of undervolting them to minimize their thermal management defects is too glaring to be ignored.
     
  5. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Intel has repeatedly said overclocking voids their warranty and they don't recommend it. Using that stance as the basis to answer complaints about overheating and thermal throttling.

    Intel doesn't support overclocking, undervolting, or any other tuning "outside the parameter's of processor specifications" - which to Intel means any user interaction that goes against stock (owners - hand's off) OEM configuration and tuning.

    During one of the roll-out's I recall Intel saying they see such tuning as coming from a small minority of owners. I don't think that's true either and again I think it is said to fit into Intel's narrative that everything is fine with their products that are overheating and thermal throttling .

    Intel responds to i7-7700K high temperature issue, tells owners they shouldn't overclock...
    May 5, 2017
    https://www.techspot.com/community/...-tells-owners-they-shouldnt-overclock.235062/

    Don't overclock Intel's Core i7-7700K
    If you wanted overclocking you should have bought AMD
    by NICK FARRELL on 08 MAY 2017
    https://www.fudzilla.com/news/processors/43583-don-t-overclock-intel-core-i7-7700k

    Does the i7 7700k overheating in idle problem is solved ?
    CIaco (Customer) asked a question.
    May 21, 2017 at 3:45 PM
    https://forums.intel.com/s/question...ing-in-idle-problem-is-solved-?language=en_US
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2019
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  6. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    The systems that have overheating and thermal throttling problems are, by and large, not overclockable. And, without regard to whether they are unlocked or not, they have overheating and thermal throttling problems and need to be undervolted running totally stock because the imbeciles that build them do a half-assed job of it. That isn't Intel's fault. It's the fault of the retards that don't have any pride in the products they sell or the experience of their customers. And, it's partially the fault of the people that pay good money for garbage. The rest of us get to enjoy an equal dose the crap they are willing to put up with. Ignorance is a terrible thing and the rain falls on the just and the unjust. Some aspects of this problem began before BGA filth became status quo. Shoddy engineering and poor quality control existed with laptops before that happened, but it has only gotten worse with lower TDP giving the manufacturers a green light to use that as a lame excuse to cut more corners.
    They're talking out of both sides of their mouth. If they did not support it they would not allow it, but it keeps them off the hook for idiots breaking things. And, like most big companies in the world, what they say varies based on the audience. They say whatever they think the audience at a given place and time wants to hear. However, what they do is far more important than what they say (just as it is for all of us). I am thankful for what they do and don't care about what they say. There always has to be a footnote to address the idiots that live among us.

    https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/gaming/overclocking-intel-processors.html
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2019
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  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    The confusing part Intel uses is to appear to support overclocking when the tiny print bottom line says their warranties don't cover user tuning and you have to purchase another warranty policy for coverage - and that is only available on the "K" sku's.

    The "K" sku's warranty doesn't support overclocking - tuning by the user outside of OEM vendor tuning except with an additional warranty.

    Notice how Intel's true overclocking support is hidden till the last footnote:
    https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/gaming/overclocking-intel-processors.html

    Product and Performance Information
    1 - Intel® technologies’ features and benefits depend on system configuration and may require enabled hardware, software, or service activation. Performance varies depending on system configuration. Check with your system manufacturer or retailer or learn more at intel.com.

    2 - Software and workloads used in performance tests may have been optimized for performance only on Intel® microprocessors. Performance tests, such as SYSmark* and MobileMark*, are measured using specific computer systems, components, software, operations, and functions. Any change to any of those factors may cause the results to vary. You should consult other information and performance tests to assist you in fully evaluating your contemplated purchases, including the performance of that product when combined with other products. For more information go to www.intel.com/benchmarks.

    3 - No product or component can be absolutely secure.

    Altering clock frequency or voltage may damage or reduce the useful life of the processor and other system components, and may reduce system stability and performance. Product warranties may not apply if the processor is operated beyond its specifications. Check with the manufacturers of system and components for additional details.

    4 - Some features may only be available with the latest version of Intel® Performance Maximizer. Visit downloadcenter.intel.com to download the latest version. Eligible processors include 9th Gen Intel® Core™ i9-9900K, i9-9900KF, i9-9900KS, i7-9700K, i7-9700KF, i5-9600K, i5-9600KF processors, and Intel® Core™ i9-10980XE Extreme Edition, i9-10940X, i9-10920X, and i9-10900X processors.

    5 - Intel® Performance Tuning Protection Plan (Intel® PTPP) allows a single replacement for your qualified boxed processor, in addition to your standard 3-year warranty.
    [ https://click.intel.com/tuningplan/
    For more information about the Performance Tuning Protection Plan see the FAQ.
    https://click.intel.com/tuningplan/purchase-a-plan]


    Also notice how Intel has recently snuck in this little tidbit - a non-sequitur to the text around it:

    Everyone: Intel your products suck and your security game is lame.

    Intel: 3 - No product or component can be absolutely secure.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2019
  8. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    Yes, that is what I was referring as as the footnotes for idiots. Supporting something and offering to pay for stupid mistakes are two different things. Veteran overclocker are used to having to take responsibility for their actions. It is primarily the noobs that believe they need the security blanket. The overclocking warranty also applies only to retail CPUs. Tray/OEM bulk SKUs are not eligible. I have never had it and have never needed it. It is super rare to kill one by overclocking.
    I would agree with that. The same is true for all tech. The only products that appear to be secure are those the hackers have not burned as many calories on. As AMD gains market share they will become more of a target and exploits will be discovered. Same is true for operating systems.

    The real problem is evil people and the lack of extreme and severe consequences for their nonsense. I still think we should implement capital punishment globally for hackers, malware authors and all forms of third-party data collectors (including so-called 'legitimate business'). Exterminate the problem--actually go through with it--and leverage the power of creating widespread fear of extermination for cybercrimes, and we'd all be better off. There would still be a few out there, but most would curb their enthusiasm when they see multiple examples of executions for cybercrimes. Kill 'em all and let God sort them out later. Including the stupid little punks on Discord hacking Ring cameras.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2019
  9. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    That is a load of spinning BS man, you've completely gone off the rails when you say stuff like that.

    You are upset with Intel building crappy stuff so you'd rather the problem is solved by murdering people instead of Intel fixing their crappy products? That's crazy talk.

    Intel is lying to everyone, spinning things however it benefits them, and hiding behind disclaimers for any blow-back that their actions might cause.

    Intel doesn't support overclocking even though they sell products that they advertise as unlocked and ready for overclocking. At the same time Intel call's out such activities as not supported by their 3 year warranty and require additional payment for only a 1 year of warranty for owners that OC - what about the original 3 years warranty listed on the boxed CPU?

    If you buy the Intel 1 year OC warranty you lose the other 2 years warranty automatically? - since you've just admitted through participation in their OC warranty that you are OC'ing outside the permitted actions of the original warranty?

    In order to get around those Intel disclaimers and still OC you'd need to be lying to Intel when they asked you if you OC'd your CPU during their Q&A for warranty support of your CPU. And, if Intel inspects the returned CPU that's burnt or shows signs of abuse then your warranty claim would be rejected.

    So to you a Noob is an honest person that refuses to lie to Intel? :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2019
  10. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    No, I don't think so. Seems like you might be overthinking things too much. Overclocking is a privilege, not a right. I don't need a warranty for that and neither does anyone else that is passionate about the sport. I've never wasted my money on that. But, undervolting isn't overclocking. It is a basic necessity for people that do not overclock and buy defective products that are not properly engineered. If the people that built slop bucket laptops from raw components cared about the products they sell and the people that buy them, it wouldn't be as necessary. But, I'm not particularly upset about anything. Overall, I am actually pretty happy and hope to see conditions continue to provide a reason for me to stay happy.

    I am also not gullible enough to believe any particular brand of product (hardware or software) is more secure than another. All the calories get burned where the harvest is plentiful. The only reason one product is more secure than another is when that product hasn't been targeted as an orchard filled with ripened low-hanging fruit.

    And, I don't really consider it being "off the rails" for taking a very hard-line, iron-fisted and pragmatic view that the world is responsible for the stupidity around cyberthreats because we have been too soft on cybercrime and fostering an environment where cybercrime has all it needs to flourish. We need to stop focusing on plugging holes and focus on killing it at the source (pun intended). This is big money and very lucrative for companies peddling security solutions. Just think how great it would be if cybercrimes were dealt with the same as murder in capital punishment states. The only losers would be the people dumb enough to commit those crimes that end up losing their lives over it and the companies getting wealthy protecting us from them.

    It's all a farce, bro... a fairy tale and self-fulfilling prophecy.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2019
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