Best tools for working on laptops?

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by asuka10456, Mar 17, 2013.

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  1. un4tural

    un4tural Notebook Evangelist

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    small drill? like one of these? Amazon.co.uk: electric screw driver

    i find it better using a manual one, i like having the full feel of it ;)

    unless you mean a grinder tool Amazon.co.uk: mini drill i mentioned it in my earlier post, but it is more of a piece of kit for moding... it is great for buffing/grinding/cutting. i got a set with a bunch of small saw discs, buffing bits and sanding bits etc. got it cheap on some sale, goes all the way to 10k rpm which is cool :)

    also the cube is one of these LODESTAR Magnetizer & Demagnetizer - Green - Free Shipping - DealExtreme it doesn't make them like neodymium magnets, but the screws stick to the driver well enough not to loose them.
     
  2. nakednakedguy

    nakednakedguy Notebook Guru

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    I don't see any point in using electric screwdrivers unless you are repairing lots of computers..
    Use isolated screwdrivers like philips and if you are handling the board use an ESD matt or ESD bracelet connected to the
    board.
    Therefor don't use those small cheap steel sets out there.
     
  3. OtherSongs

    OtherSongs Notebook Evangelist

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    Sorry but can't help with regard to "small drill"

    For compact screw driver set, it's hands down to Husky HD-74501AB at ~$10 (many flat and 4 sided) for use with my two Lenovo's.
     
  4. Krane

    Krane Notebook Prophet

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    This[​IMG]

    I just can't see the laptop as being an environment for power tools.
    You're not wrong; they only last a repair or two, then become dull and useless.

    In many instances, an old credit cards can also make a good pry tools. Whatever you do don't resort to using metal implements against plastic (yes, I've used metal on my laptop :(), or your laptop chassis will pay the price for your lack of vision.
     
  5. cdoublejj

    cdoublejj Notebook Deity

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    magnetic screw driver. that's it.
     
  6. Prostar Computer

    Prostar Computer Company Representative

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    I have a Huskey ratcheting set and can attest that it's definitely a good little kit as well. :thumbsup: Had to magnetize the bits myself is all. I somewhat like the ratchet in use for tight screws, but the stubby handle and bits can sometimes leave something to be desired (which, after seeing that boxer set again, I'm thinking of purchasing it now).
     
  7. asuka10456

    asuka10456 Notebook Consultant

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    I can go through about 10 laptops a day, depending on whats going on. I think a small drill would be helpful for at least outer screws. Looking for somewhat of a light mini drill.
     
  8. un4tural

    un4tural Notebook Evangelist

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    Well, I'd check battery life and spin speeds with specs most of all, as they don't usually have large batteries, doubt it would last the whole day of screwing. lol.

    Also i would think cheap ones are rather crap, wouldn't touch one without adjustable speed/torque functions, as well as wouldn't buy one without decent battery life as well as decent spin speeds... having to use it every day, exchanging batteries and constantly charging would be a pain. Possibly get one that can charge as well as work at same time, though i might just be really OCD about it. wouldn't want any more cables in my workspace than there has to be too.

    my grinder lasts around 15min-1hour depending on use, but even when it lasts over 30minutes, it still feels like its too soon. Like how in the olden days i would charge my phone once a week, now its every night. That sort of too soon.
     
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