Best tools for working on laptops?

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by asuka10456, Mar 17, 2013.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. asuka10456

    asuka10456 Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    27
    Messages:
    113
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Not 100% sure if this is the right section for this. Hoping since tools are needed for most upgrades that it is!

    I was hoping some of you guys out there would know of a nice small drill with magnetic tips to work on laptops? I tried searching for it, not sure why I couldn't find any. I always see them used in disassembly videos. Also if anyone knows of a good screw driver set to use on laptops? Links would be awesome, thanks in advance.
     
  2. djembe

    djembe drum while you work

    Reputations:
    1,064
    Messages:
    1,458
    Likes Received:
    204
    Trophy Points:
    81
    I've got a nice small interchangeable screwdriver & bit set called the "UltraSteel 44 piece precision screwdriver set." I got it at Wal-Mart, of all places. It's able to deal with almost any kind of unprotected small screws - flathead, Philips, square head, penta slot and hex slot.
     
  3. HTWingNut

    HTWingNut Potato

    Reputations:
    21,578
    Messages:
    35,379
    Likes Received:
    9,867
    Trophy Points:
    931
    I have been using a cheap precision set for the last umpteen years, only use two of them, some soft paper tower and high % alcohol for repasting, otherwise, nothing else needed really. And I've disassembled and reassembled a boatload of desktops and laptops in the last 20 years.

    I magnetize the tips of my screwdrivers. It's nice for added insurance you don't drop that tiny screw so it gets wedged in your laptop somewhere you have to disassemble your whole laptop to access. Not that I've ever been there. /whistles while shifting toes and looking anywhere but straight ahead/

    Soldering iron only if you want to get dangerous.
     
  4. Krane

    Krane Notebook Prophet

    Reputations:
    706
    Messages:
    4,654
    Likes Received:
    108
    Trophy Points:
    131
    Yikes! But I think maybe OP was hoping for a specific/custom set?

    I don't know if they make anything specific for laptop, but as mentioned, a magnetic tip is an absolute must. My heart was pounding when one of my screws slipped and lodged near an opening. The thought of having to disassemble the entire laptop to get at it terrified me.
     
  5. Prostar Computer

    Prostar Computer Company Representative

    Reputations:
    1,257
    Messages:
    7,427
    Likes Received:
    1,016
    Trophy Points:
    331
    There aren't a lot of magnetized precision screw drivers; typically, it's debatable as to whether to use magnetized bits or screw drivers for working on computers, as magnets are not a motherboard's best friend.

    There is a set by Boxer I've used that comes magnetized out of the box. It looks identical to this, although I'm not sure that one is magnetized. But honestly, you can magnetize it yourself; just pick up a decent magnet at your local hardware store and rub it on the tip of the screwdriver/bit for a minute. I magnetized a set from Home Depot that way and it works fine. :)
     
  6. Jarhead

    Jarhead 恋の♡アカサタナ

    Reputations:
    4,997
    Messages:
    12,165
    Likes Received:
    2,987
    Trophy Points:
    581
    I just use a cheap Dollar General set of small screwdrivers, like these:

    [​IMG]

    they work just fine for me, and never felt like I required a magnetized version of them to perform computer maintenance.
     
  7. un4tural

    un4tural Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    53
    Messages:
    666
    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    31
    well while the cheap sets, with a lovely picture too by Kuroi-Tsubasa, i found that those cheap ones wear out really quickly, as usually they are made of soft steel and just have a spray-on coating to make them look posher than they are.

    I've gone through boat loads of screw drivers, now settled on a few:

    Precision Screw Drivers Toolkit for Electronics DIY (45-Piece Set) - Free Shipping - DealExtreme got this for pretty much anything technical, basically when i encounter a weirdo screw. used to be 20,50$ when i bought it, bummer. also has nice flexible extender and a simple long one.

    and i have one of these 9-in-1 Handy Precise Screwdrivers Set - Green - Free Shipping - DealExtreme to carry about, as a philips is usually all you need to crack a laptop open. i have a short long one in case theres deep holes in the laptop, where the little head cant reach or the set in other link cannot fit in there.

    i also bought one of those cheap magnetize/demagnetize cubes with 2 holes in them just swipe the screwdriver through and whola its magnetized or demagnetized on the whim.

    Soldering iron, especially if you going to solder electronics, needs to be as fine tipped as possible, don't go for gas powered ones, as they usually have wobbly tip assemblies(at least ones i dealt with). If you don't have experience as a surgeon or previous soldering experience I'd highly recommend finding some old piece of motherboard or such and have some good practice first, will save a lot of tears and $_$.

    thats about it, might want one of those prying tools, as using a screw driver might damage plastics at times. Though i usually use my finger nails, as those prying tools don't last very long. Could be that I'm using them wrong dunno.

    i got some magnets/trays for screws etc. and other common sense stuff, just for basic convenience as looking for screws in a shag rug is a... well difficult.


    That should cover you for most part, if you plan to break into tablets and such, I'd highly recommend a heat gun as they are usually more glue than anything else... Which when you spend well over 300£ on say an ipad, you'd expect to be able to fix it... but then again, new super slim and sleek rubbish is as repairable as a rock. Probably would have more luck fixing a rock actually.

    Possibly some pliers and tweezers etc. small details like that to make them ribbon cables plug-in easier.

    Then if you'd want to go more moding, stuff to cut and grind bits and blobs. etc. epoxy. highly depends on the project.
     
  8. Jarhead

    Jarhead 恋の♡アカサタナ

    Reputations:
    4,997
    Messages:
    12,165
    Likes Received:
    2,987
    Trophy Points:
    581
    I haven't personally had a problem with the screwdriver heads themselves, though it's hard to apply torque on those screwdrivers in cases where I deal with a tight screw. for those, I have a screwdriver with a bigger-radius handle and if I don't have that, I use a pair of pliers, attach that to the screwdriver handle at 90 degrees, and twist.
     
  9. asuka10456

    asuka10456 Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    27
    Messages:
    113
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    31
    #5 Mentioned a Boxer set, Looks like I found it. It may be the same one in the link, they look the same.

    Boxer 30 Pcs 4mm Precision Screwdriver Set - Amazon.com

    That is what I found, the reviews says its magnetic. Magnetize & demagnetize cubes sound awesome as well. I have a soldering iron. I actually work at a Computer & Laptop shop and its been a pain sometimes with the tools they have. Which is why I rather invest in my own set. Anyone know when I can get a small drill? I usually see them being used in disassembly videos.
     
  10. BangBangPlay

    BangBangPlay Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    199
    Messages:
    241
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    30
    I would recommend any of the 3.5-7.2V electric screwdrivers out there. I would recommend this Hitachi or possibly the Makita. Both are variable speed and both have adjustable torque settings. I would stay away from the ones that don't have torque/speed settings (Skil and Black and Decker) because you could easily strip or cross thread delicate and rare screws. Just search for cordless or electric screwdrivers and you'll see a whole bunch of options on Amazon or Google.

    As far as the magnetic drivers, there are several different sets available that will work with the 1/4 hex drive found on most of em . This Dewalt set would do, although there are many more just like it. You want a set that has #1 phillips bits (#2 is the most common) for working on electronics. This set has plenty of different phillips style bits, and the drive guides are magnetic so it makes any bit you put into it also magnetic. I would be cautious using the drill on some screws, especially when loosening them. The drill can easily strip the small heads when loosening, especially if they have loctite applied. And it can also cross thread small crews easily when tightening them. I would get into the practice of starting them by hand (tightening and loosening) and then finish them off with the drill.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page