Best secondary 2TB M.2 SSD?

Discussion in '2015+ Alienware 13 / 15 / 17' started by etern4l, May 24, 2019.

Tags:
?

Is Intel 660P the best value secondary 2TB M.2 SSD on the market at the moment?

  1. Yes

    37.5%
  2. No

    62.5%
  1. etern4l

    etern4l Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    164
    Messages:
    1,028
    Likes Received:
    378
    Trophy Points:
    101
    Well, intuition aside, the question is: how exactly is the health percentage calculated? Fair enough with the concern of temps on SSD health, but then surely the memory temp would be a primary consideration and at 37-40C I'm not worried at all.
     
  2. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

    Reputations:
    6,561
    Messages:
    10,089
    Likes Received:
    7,390
    Trophy Points:
    931
    I just look at SMART status esp. Pre-Fail type of flags. In SSD, Spare cells, TBW,Temps(Worst), amount of SLC cache determine the lifetime of SSD but they are not precise and just approximations.
    CDI shows 100% disk health while HWINFO reports 96% health on an SSD based on Spare cells availability.
     
  3. propeldragon

    propeldragon Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    122
    Messages:
    536
    Likes Received:
    365
    Trophy Points:
    76
    Memory actually runs better when it's warmer (obviously not hot). Not sure how much of a difference it makes.
     
  4. Aivxtla

    Aivxtla Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    290
    Messages:
    364
    Likes Received:
    513
    Trophy Points:
    106
    Drive life remaining is based on TBW for most drives, yes temps can have an effect but its not as simple to factor that in. So to keep it simple its based on TBW for most drives assuming they operate within rated temp limits. I'm sure maybe some manufacturers use complicated algorithms, but according to some places (including HWI Info's creator on their forums, when someone asked a similar question) I scoured regarding this long back this was generally the explanation.

    As for the sensor, on a few of them that I did see location labels of it, the sensor was actually on the controller itself, ie Oracles 1.6 TB drives (though SATA), so it could vary by manufacturer.

    Interestingly high temperatures are good for write endurance and cooler temperatures are good for data retention (In a 0-70C range), Slide 50 . A song of Ice and Fire lol.
    https://people.inf.ethz.ch/omutlu/pub/heatwatch-3D-nand-errors-and-self-recovery_hpca18_talk.pdf
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2019
    propeldragon, etern4l and Vasudev like this.
  5. MSGaldenzi

    MSGaldenzi Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    109
    Messages:
    1,242
    Likes Received:
    85
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Do you have any reading material as to why it would be bad as a boot drive? Is it just for lack of speed or is it because it is more prone to failure? I ask because I was considering this in an ultrabook that only has 1 spot for an SSD.
     
  6. etern4l

    etern4l Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    164
    Messages:
    1,028
    Likes Received:
    378
    Trophy Points:
    101
    Based on the reviews, the speed is pretty good as long as it works off the TLC caches, then it collapses to 100MB/s (after tens of gigabytes have been transferred). I'd think the only 2 reasons to get this instead of the Corsair MP510 are 1) probably slightly cooler and more power efficient on paper (that said the MP510 is quite cool, certainly much cooler than Samsungs) 2) it's slightly cheaper.
     
    Vasudev likes this.
  7. propeldragon

    propeldragon Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    122
    Messages:
    536
    Likes Received:
    365
    Trophy Points:
    76
    It just won't be as reliable and breaks down quicker. Read an article about slc, mlc, tlc, qlc. They have more. QLC stores more bits per cell.
     
  8. Aivxtla

    Aivxtla Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    290
    Messages:
    364
    Likes Received:
    513
    Trophy Points:
    106

    Read my post in the Link about NAND types, QLC isn’t mentioned but SLC/MLC/TLC are and you will understand what the other posters are speaking about, QLC means 4 bits per cell FYI. That post also speaks about endurance vs bits per cell.

    Look half way into post.
    http://forum.notebookreview.com/thr...ews-and-advice.429972/page-1129#post-10735535
     
    MSGaldenzi, etern4l and Vasudev like this.
  9. propeldragon

    propeldragon Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    122
    Messages:
    536
    Likes Received:
    365
    Trophy Points:
    76
    I was looking at my 850 evo and 850 pro and they both are rated for the same TBW (150). My 850 pro has 10TB of writes and 850 evo has 1.5TB of writes. Both 99% health according to hwinfo64 and 100% health for crystaldisk (For both ssds).
     
  10. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

    Reputations:
    6,561
    Messages:
    10,089
    Likes Received:
    7,390
    Trophy Points:
    931
    Check Spare cell aka Percentage Used. 850 Evo will report more spares used eventhough TBW <1. I tried secure erasing several times but %age used is steadily increasing.
     
Loading...

Share This Page