Baking a motherboard

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by cenex, Jan 14, 2013.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. K-TRON

    K-TRON Hi, I'm Jimmy Diesel ^_^

    Reputations:
    4,412
    Messages:
    8,077
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    205
    Instead of taking advice, it is just immediately criticized. That is what I hate about this forum.
    I came back on here after two sum odd years to get a question answered in another section, and figured I would share some knowledge.
    Okay, maybe I should have proofread what I posted. The second sentence should have read:
    "Most circuit boards use a high grade solder, which requires a minimum of 480F in order to re-flow. I find that 760F is a good working temperature for soldering."
    Ive fixed over a hundred water damaged and heat damaged boards. If you know how to use a soldering iron and a heat gun properly, you can fix just about anything. I guess that message did not get across.

    Chris
     
  2. radji

    radji Farewell, Solenya...

    Reputations:
    3,856
    Messages:
    3,074
    Likes Received:
    2,561
    Trophy Points:
    231
    Any recommendations for cell phone boards? I've successfully baked a desktop board and a notebook GPU but now I get the privilege of trying to bake an HTC android main board and seeing if that helps it. I've already removed the board from the rest of the phone so it will be in the oven by itself. I'm just curious if the same principles apply to such a smaller PCB.
     
  3. Qing Dao

    Qing Dao Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    1,593
    Messages:
    1,779
    Likes Received:
    301
    Trophy Points:
    101
    It is called a discussion. You critique other people's ideas, submit your own, and yours get critiqued in turn. There is no reason to take anything personally unless you honestly believe that your knowledge is unquestionably superior to that of everyone else and that everyone should take you at your word.

    The first thing you said was that it wouldn't work, so you must not have read that it already did work. Then you recommend using a method that apparently takes skill, practice, new equipment, and can easily kill your hardware. So that doesn't really sound appealing compared to using an oven. Then you went on about a soldering iron being the best thing to use, even though that has nothing to do with BGA.

    Also the point of the oven is not to completely melt down the solder and add or remove components. It is to get the solder a little squishy to mend a fracture or two in a solder joint.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page