Baking a motherboard

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by cenex, Jan 14, 2013.

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  1. cdoublejj

    cdoublejj Notebook Deity

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    BGA flux. for a long time i have been using clear liquid no clean flux and have yet to try paste bga flux, regardless you have one hell of a time trying to apply in baking process, this is where the Reflow is superior.
     
  2. cenex

    cenex Notebook Enthusiast

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    Huh. It actually worked. The only question is for how long, which considering my GPU is sitting at 60C with just the desktop open, I'd say not long. The thermal paste application may have been a little bit shoddy. But I can always hope I guess.

    In the meantime I need to get everything updated, buy a new keyboard (I once spilled Coke on it. Even if Dell gives you faulty hardware, they do a pretty good job of protecting internal parts!), and hope my hard drive doesn't fail along with the graphics card.
     
  3. cdoublejj

    cdoublejj Notebook Deity

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    use as5 thermal grease and cooper shims instead of thermal pads and if you don't have an air compressor use a tooth brush to clean out the heat sinks.
     
  4. cenex

    cenex Notebook Enthusiast

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    I did use as5. Copper shims might be a good idea however.
     
  5. miro_gt

    miro_gt Notebook Deity

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    what temperature and how long did you bake it ?

    pictures ?
     
  6. cenex

    cenex Notebook Enthusiast

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    385F for 7 minutes with everything except the top and bottom of the GPU covered, letting it cool with the oven door open. I forgot to take pictures >.>
     
  7. cdoublejj

    cdoublejj Notebook Deity

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    i think 385f should work but, i usually go for 400 maybe a smidge over as most mobos use high temp silver solder. if you do you copper shims try and get a set of 600 and 1000 grit sad paper and piece of glass (photo frame) and lap it a bit they tend to have horrible high spots on the perimeter of one side. I use my finger nails to grip them and sing in one direction back and forth.
     
  8. K-TRON

    K-TRON Hi, I'm Jimmy Diesel ^_^

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    385F is not hot enough to do anything.
    Most circuit boards use a high grade solder, which requires a minimum of 480F in order to re-flow. I find that 760F is a good working temperature for BGA reflowing with a soldering iron.
    You can obtain much higher temperatures with a heat gun, but you really need to know what you are doing. If the board is not evenly supported, or heat is not applied evenly, your board will become droopy. When it cools, the inlet wires will crack and there is nothing that you can do about it. You also do not want to use a convection over, as any large temperature fluctuations or wind movements will cause solder to travel causing shorts elsewhere.
    The moral of the story is, if you know what is broken, you can fix it more precisely with a high grade soldering iron in hand. I would highly recommend practicing on a junk Pentium 4 board or something you can obtain readily, before risking it all on a $500 motherboard.

    Chris
     
  9. Qing Dao

    Qing Dao Notebook Deity

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    Well 385 F seemed to work for the OP. You don't need nor want the solder to flow, you want to get is soft and reform slightly where it cracked before.

    So instead of the oven, you recommend a heatgun, which you say can easily kill your board? Or a soldering iron, which I'm not sure how it is possible to do BGA?
     
  10. miro_gt

    miro_gt Notebook Deity

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    this is not a soldering-an-element-on-to-a-board type of situation. Bake your mobo in 760F and may as well put it in the trash can after that.
     
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