At night I had 100% battery, about 20 hours later 90%

Discussion in 'Asus' started by leftisthominid, Jan 17, 2012.

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  1. leftisthominid

    leftisthominid Notebook Guru

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    So I just putted my battery in, it still was 97%. So my laptop is pulling charge when off... Anyway I can figure out what I can do to stop it?
     
  2. leftisthominid

    leftisthominid Notebook Guru

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    Bumping

    Anyone else with an N55SF see this problem?
     
  3. JOSEA

    JOSEA NONE

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    There is a lot of good information here:
    http://forum.notebookreview.com/not...icles/444615-remove-battery-when-not-use.html
    Congats on the new machine also!!
     
  4. Katana Paul

    Katana Paul Notebook Enthusiast

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    Had mine a couple of months. It usually sits with the A/C plugged in and left in standby when not being used.

    I'll experiment with the battery and come back to you with results...
     
  5. JOSEA

    JOSEA NONE

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    Good call the N55F does support that feature.
    OP - Try removing AI charger software and test, if there is no BIOS setting to disable that feature.
    (Are you using version Version V1.0.2 ?)
    If not you could also try to update ASUSTeK Computer Inc. -Support- Drivers and Download AiCharger
     
  6. leftisthominid

    leftisthominid Notebook Guru

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    I don't have AiCharger installed. My BIOS is set to defaults. When my computer is off and unplugged, I do not have charging USB ports.

    These days I just remove the battery when I unplug. I asked someone who posted a review on Amazon.com if they have this issue and they responded "A few percent is what I would typically lose overnight". I think this is just a design problem. I sent ASUS a tech inquiry online about this over a week ago, no response...
     
  7. braincruser

    braincruser Newbie

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    Do you unplug first then shut down, or do you shut down completelly then unplug it. because during the shutdown computer disables all powersaving options and can spend quite a lot of power. 3-5% battery charge is completelly possible.
     
  8. leftisthominid

    leftisthominid Notebook Guru

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    I shutdown completely than unplug. I am still having this problem, and now that my battery is getting older, it is a bigger nuisance.
     
  9. nipsen

    nipsen Notebook Ditty

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    Li-ion batteries.. organic electrolyte, potential build-up of residue on the cathode material, and so on.. they discharge more when the cells age, they do that.. But typically what you're seeing is that the battery will discharge the first 5-10% very quickly, and then end up discharging normally (about 1% a day) after that. That's completely normal for lithium ion cells operating on fairly high voltage. On lower voltage cells, you won't have a noticeably higher discharge rate until the battery has aged a bit and the cells are actually damaged.

    Other than that - when the laptop is turned off, the battery still is connected to a circuit, and the mainboard has some components drawing a little bit of power. I'm.. just guessing here.. but it's probably discharging more power from just being connected to the power-supply circuit than the actual draw for diodes and so on.. And frankly, disconnecting the battery to avoid that power-draw is probably not as significant for the battery's health than the fact that you're now storing it in a colder area.

    There's also the entire thing with how the battery circuit logic will report a full charge even if the battery isn't fully charged, though. When the capacity deteriorates a bit after it's completely new. So you would only ever be charging the battery to what the battery logic will report is a full charge. And then the battery meter application would for example report the charge level compared to the original capacity when you're switching to battery power. And that would "lose" you some 10% of the charge pretty much right away, unless the battery meter application will store the variable "max charge" rate of the actual capacity across a fresh boot. I can't imagine that MS would care about programming something like that into the battery meter application, or, well.. not screw that up and create some sort of inconsistency :)
     
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