ASUS ROG Zephyrus GX501 Owner's Lounge

Discussion in 'ASUS Reviews and Owners' Lounges' started by HamzimusPrime, May 20, 2017.

  1. wickette

    wickette Notebook Deity

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    Some high end thermal paste would add what ? 3-5$ USD per unit ? Why ASUS and the others wouldn't up a little the performance of their thermal paste ? They're making each new unit harder and harder to open and repaste, yet they still use that same low performance grey thermal paste.

    First things I'd do after testing my unit will be to undervolt then repaste, sadly 75% of laptops that don't look like trucks have 90°+C CPU temps.

    When Volta/Ampere will come i'll see which one : Acer triton, Asus GX, MSI GS65 handle CPU temps the best :).

    Since the GPU is not a problem Pascal coffee lake laptops will be a good indicator I doubt they will change all barebones in the upcoming months for the next GPUs....
     
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  2. thebigbadchef

    thebigbadchef Notebook Enthusiast

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    I know little about the Zephyrus but I will always try to LM any of my devices (provided that im dealing with copper and not aluminium).
    I simply cant stand idle temps of 50C...regardless of the laptop model.
    My Msi GT83 was hitting 92C with stock paste and stock clocks on cpu/gpu, I applied LM and now won't go past 80. (Note: slightly overvolted to allow 4.4 ghz).

    I will do more research on the undervoltage for the Zephyrus (as I dont want it to lose performance) but LM is definitely going on it. :)

    Not sure if typo or being ironic about gtx 1070 (re: max-q). I know that if you put the specs on paper the max-q 1080 is pretty much an OC ed laptop 1070 (except having 500+ cuda cores, bit more memory speed but falling a bit behind on the core/boost clocks). But still...fact remains: the thickness on this laptop when you compare it to the Msi gt83 is a great advantage. Looking forward to those 75-80c temps on LM. Lets hope I got a decent (flat enough) copper heat sink.
     
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  3. SteveEricJordan

    SteveEricJordan Notebook Enthusiast

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    Last edited: Jun 15, 2019
  4. Vistar Shook

    Vistar Shook Notebook Deity

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    Yes you do want to have the vrms, mosfets, etc cooled either with thermal pads or gooey thermal paste like k5pro. The vrms don't have sensors so we can't know if they are overheating.

    Enviado de meu Pixel 2 usando Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2018
  5. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    The word on this is that the cost isn't the issue, it's the characteristics of long term viable paste vs highest performance paste.

    The laptop makers don't want to re-paste the laptops once they are made, it's expensive to send them back and forth, so they need a paste that lasts years and is stable in operation over that time.

    So thick paste that doesn't dry out or pump out over a long time period is preferable to a thin paste that has great thermal properties over a short time period.

    That's why I don't recommend re-pasting a brand new laptop. Work with the undervolt, fan, and CPU tuning - use G-sync / Freesync / RTSS to limit FPS to the sync rate of the laptop, use convective cooling (lift the rear higher than the front of the laptop), and don't be so picky on having "the lowest temps" - unless it's thermal throttling reducing temps further is not going to improve performance or extend the life of the CPU.

    Once you repaste you are looking at doing it again and again, I'd plan for every 6 months over the life of the laptop, and if you sell it now you have to tell the buyer they need to do the same. Not a good selling point for most people.

    If you get a bad thermals laptop out of the box, none of those fixes get the thermals under thermal throttling (very rare), then return it for another one.

    It's not worth the hassle to do it yourself, you wouldn't pull apart your brand new car off the lot and redo all of the gaskets would you? :)
     
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  6. thebigbadchef

    thebigbadchef Notebook Enthusiast

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    I agree with this 100%. However I enjoy doing it, the zephyrus I got isnt brand new but I do know for a fact that it hasnt been pushed to its limits as the seller used it more as a replacement for an "office" purposed macbook pro.

    I was just amazed at the fact that the lowest temp on idle mode was around 50C. It would go up to 65C by simply exploring through files or browsing web (no video or graphical content). Im sure we can all agree thats not normal.

    It all made sense when I opened it up and realised that the stock paste applied on both CPU and GPU wouldnt even stick to my fingers. Residue was pretty much like dust/sand - incredibly dry hance the little-to-none thermal conductivity and 50-65C avg idling temps.

    I should be getting the LM and pads on Tuesday so will keep you updated on how it goes and new temps. As im sure they ll be way lower.
     
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  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Windows 10 runs many things in the background, and it might be that the power plan locks the CPU frequency high too, see if you can set the Windows active Power Plan CPU performance to 0%/100% so it can downclock.

    Did you undervolt at all, I don't recall seeing you mention it...
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2018
  8. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Ah, you haven't :)
    You don't lose performance by undervolting, you reduce the needed voltage to the CPU for stable operation.

    Generally the BIOS has a too high CPU voltage bias so any wonky CPU's still run, but for most samples it's way too high.

    So if you undervolt with Intel Extreme Tuning Utility, or XTU, or ThrottleStop - TS, you can tune the voltage down to what the CPU needs instead of overdriving it with more voltage than it needs - which helps it run cooler and live longer.

    In the current generation of 4c/8t CPU's -100mV is a good starting point, and also enough to drop the 4c/8t 100% load temps by about -10C, maybe more for the 6c/12t new CPU's, but we don't have any reports yet.

    The range of undervolt varies by CPU, so you have to experiment for each CPU to find the best setting. -50mV to -220mV have been reported as stable at stock settings.

    As you OC the CPU, you may need to drop the undervolt a tad, at 4.5ghz I was still able to undervolt by -15mV and run prime95 non-avx, and everything else was stable too.

    It's easy to do, I'd recommend XTU to start, and just select the -mV setting for the Core (all cores and cache are set to the same undervolt by this setting), and start with -100mV - or -50mV if you want to be conservative. Then run XTU Benchmark and make sure it runs, and increase the undervolt by -10mV at a time until you get a failure - Bluescreen / or other anomoly - and then reboot and back off by +5mV from the last value.

    Then after you have the undervolt tuned in for maximum load testing, you need to test for idle stability - usually another +10mV correction is needed, but sometimes no change is needed, it depends on the CPU.

    I exit all programs and leave it sit for a while, like an hour or so, and if it is stable, set up a Saved Profile in XTU so that value is applied every time you boot, or you could select it yourself each time you want an undervolt.

    Then as you OC, and reduce the undervolt, set up a Custom Profile in XTU for each OC setup.

    10c reduction in thermals at 100% load is very helpful. If you were hitting 93c and thermal throttling at peak loads, this undervolt would put you back in the 80c range and regain your full performance.

    I hope you find the cause of the high idle temp, but I think it might just be the thin laptop and Asus's propensity to run hot instead of ramping up the fan's to reduce temperatures. Asus likes their laptops quiet more than cool.

    Be careful with that LM on laptop CPU's, there have been instances where people have bricked their laptop, same for GPU's.

    Good luck. :)
     
  9. SteveEricJordan

    SteveEricJordan Notebook Enthusiast

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    Last edited: Jun 15, 2019
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  10. thebigbadchef

    thebigbadchef Notebook Enthusiast

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    Thanks for all this.

    LM and thermal pads arrived today. Will keep thread updated once I am done with it + some after LM temps. Sadly I do not have before temps screenshots but light gaming (30 min) at normal room temp (22-23C) got the CPU up to 93-94 C.

    Will definitely be careful. I like to be 110% safe so I know it's a bit overkill but what here are 2 pics from my MSI GT83 LM procedure where I made sure I don't brick it by applying:
    3 coats of acrylic nail protector on PCBs (applied every 30 min to allow some time to dry) + Super 33+ tape on top. This current build still rocks an overvolted 6820HK running a stable 4.4 ghz with max temps never going past 79-80C.
    Stock turbo clock 3.8 ghz and no overvoltage highest temps: 73C.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2018
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