ASUS ROG Zephyrus GX501 Owner's Lounge

Discussion in 'ASUS Reviews and Owners' Lounges' started by HamzimusPrime, May 20, 2017.

  1. Ghent

    Ghent Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    5
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Re-pasting seems not logical for me. You open up a brand new piece of hardware just for 10 degree heat reduction. Why buy this laptop if you have concerns about heat? Its max. life span is 2-3 years so it seems useless to me.


    Tapatalk kullanarak iPhone aracılığıyla gönderildi
     
    hmscott likes this.
  2. GreggoG

    GreggoG Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    2
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    6
    The whole point is to extend the life of the product as much as possible. High heat has a tendency to reduce the lifespan of a computer. Electrical components wear out faster with higher heat, and likewise, the cooling fans will burn out sooner.

    A side-benefit of it is that a cooler laptop doesn't have to spin the fans up as much, so it's quieter. You can make the argument that it's not worth possibly breaking it, which is a valid point, but I bought mine used so I had no warranty, and I've opened up laptops before so I had no concerns doing it.

    I think the lifespan is greater than 2 years. Considering that the processor and graphics are nearly the same performance as full desktop equivalents, I'm not worried about it's lifespan considering that I can get 120fps on Battlefield 1 at 1080p with ultra settings across the board.
     
  3. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

    Reputations:
    4,882
    Messages:
    17,088
    Likes Received:
    20,986
    Trophy Points:
    931
    That's a fallacy that supposedly rabid repaster's are trying to extend the life of their laptop. It's the furthest thing from their minds. They just want to win the lowest temperature competition.

    It's a thin excuse after the fact that has no basis in reality.

    If I undervolt bringing load temps down from 90c to 80c, that's showing a range of temps in mid 70's to mid 80's during heavy use, it's not going to extend the life of the laptop by reducing thermals further.

    I've had laptops last 10 years or more (probably still in use somewhere), running in the 80's under load, and I've seen others laptops run in the 90's, still kicking after 10 years.

    There is no further advantage to reducing thermals once you are under thermal throttling. None.

    The risk of repasting over the life of the laptop negates any imagined benefit of further temperature reductions.

    In fact, after you sell your laptop it's unlikely the new owner, especially the 3rd or 4th owner, is going to be re-pasting savvy, and they will reap the vengence of dried out pumped out paste and super high thermals for the rest of the life of the laptop, and it will probably keep running for years at those high temps too.

    Remember, the CPU's are rated to 100c-105c, with plenty of built in protections against damage from high temperatures, the CPU will survive just fine without repasting.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2018
    KY_BULLET likes this.
  4. thebigbadchef

    thebigbadchef Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    11
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    41
    Trophy Points:
    26
    No basis in reality? I'll give you 1 single comparison example:

    Hm...can we look at last 5 years (since liquid metal started to be popular) - how many examples of people taking the risks and managing to achieve -20 up to -25C temperature changes (regardless if Desktop or Laptop) as opposed to using normal thermal paste (lets leave the risks aside for a second). If this is not increasing your components' life, I don't know what is.

    I have also had all kinds of laptops in the past 15 years and yes I have seen temps reaching 95C (with absolutely no thermal throttle whatsoever) on an Alienware M18x (i7-2960XM + Nvidia 580m SLI) one of my old devices. I repasted/opened this unit for maintenance (repasting+dust clearing) more than a dozen times in 5 years and after 5 years of intense usage it was still rocking.

    But personally I would always advise people to repaste (AS LONG AS THEY KNOW WHAT THEY ARE DOING). If you know what LM does and know what you are getting yourself into: do it. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to realize that conductive liquid needs to be applied in tiny amounts with appropriate safety measures (which, in this day and age - are all over youtube/notebookreview/other websites/google/on the web generally. I haven't seen more than 2 examples on the web of people (perhaps they didn't want to post it...) bricking their devices by going for LM repaste.

    Finally, my take on this is: if you can repaste and have a bit of knowledge on what you are doing - do it - it is worth it and it will extend your device's life by a lot.

    I do however agree that tricks such as undervolting and keeping fps counters to your display's refresh rate (+others) can also lower temps. But repasting your unit once/6 months can save you a lot of trouble on the long run.

    With laptops like the Zephyrus you got the tiniest heatsink blades - dust will get in between in a matter of months and undervolting your CPU will not help with this issue. Yes you can get an air spray can and try to get rid of it but you risk damaging the fans by pushing dust directly into the fans reducing their speed and life.

    Luckily for me I live in England and quite far from the nearest city and it rains a lot over here (in the North) I don't get much dust to be honest but I used to live in Eastern Europe for quite some time - I had to open up my Alienware (which was my 4th laptop) every 4 months and clear out the dust.

    There are so many factors that can directly impact a laptop's life. Repaste will only help (ONLY AND ONLY IF YOU KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING) - you only need to know the basics. The small things: such as using the right screwdriver so you don't damage screws on the long run, using the right thermal pads, the right paste, having a bit of common sense when dealing with compact devices such as the zephyrus - not applying too much force as the thing is fragile (+others) - and if you are not sure about it - go on the web and ask. There will always be people willing to help - at least that's how I got into it long time ago.
     
    Vistar Shook and hmscott like this.
  5. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

    Reputations:
    4,882
    Messages:
    17,088
    Likes Received:
    20,986
    Trophy Points:
    931
    Your comparison isn't a good reason, as I've already said, unless you are thermal throttling you don't *need* to re-paste, as any thermals under thermal throttling will work fine long term.

    There is no advantage in performance or longevity dropping thermals under thermal throttling, and undervolting will do that without re-pasting.

    If your brand new laptop still thermal throttles with an undervolt, then return it within the 15 day (more or less, check your receipt) and get another one.

    You wouldn't pull out your new car or truck engine and re-paste it, would you? If your new microwave or stereo failed out of the box, you'd return it without a thought about fixing it yourself. You should consider your laptop the same way, it's not your responsibility to fix it, and getting involved can make it much worse - including losing the ability to get it working again.

    I'm glad you enjoy working on computer hardware, I do too, but after many years of experience I know enough not to recommend or encourage people to start re-pasting if they haven't already, too much can go wrong to encourage people to open up and screw up their laptops.

    I've seen enough basket case situations where people that shouldn't have tried working on their laptop were encouraged by people that make it sound easy - mostly because they have been doing it for years - and then the unsuspecting novice is convinced they can do it themselves.

    It's got no benefits worth the suffering I've seen, or the bricked laptops from leaking LM - crazy as it seems people with zero experience will try LM on their first go around and wind up with a dead laptop.

    Working on laptops have too many little details that have a learning curve and surprises for those doing it the first time.

    Given there is no actual performance benefit to reducing thermals under thermal throttling, it's not worth wasting the time and effort.
     
  6. GreggoG

    GreggoG Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    2
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    6
    A book I found on computer reliability as well as a paper by TI seem to come to the same conclusion, that lower temperatures corresponds to higher lifespan. The textbook said the rule of thumb is double the lifespan for every 10 degree drop.

    Plus, thermal cycling hurts longevity, and I'd rather have a CPU go from 40 to 70 rather than 40 to 90. And, even if temperature didn't affect longevity at all, I'd prefer a quieter laptop to one that sounds like a vacuum.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2018
    Vistar Shook and hmscott like this.
  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

    Reputations:
    4,882
    Messages:
    17,088
    Likes Received:
    20,986
    Trophy Points:
    931
    Hey, if you want to believe some theoretical book calculation over insights gained from years of actual hands on experience , you go for it.

    I'm writing for not just you, but for people that will pay attention and save themselves the trouble of re-pasting a perfectly good brand new just out of the box laptop to no useful benefit.

    If that's not you, that's cool, you enjoy your DIY project, and others can choose to enjoy using their laptop, instead of pulling it apart for some imaginary benefits.

    You'll likely sell that laptop and trade up long before your imaginary benefit to longevity has a chance to kick in.

    The 2nd and 3rd owners won't benefit either, given your "rule of thumb" doubling the life span.

    From what, 10 years to 20 years?

    As your re-pasted laptop dries out from aging in a dustbin somewhere, long forgotten, as that 2nd decade of existence comes to an end, you be sure and track it down and find it and check out what the temps are.

    No sense letting all that re-pasting work go for naught. ;)
     
  8. GreggoG

    GreggoG Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    2
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Well, ignoring the fact that the part of the book was based on actual observations and not theory, and also ignoring the fact that I consulted my dad, who has about 40 years of experience building microprocessors and circuitry for the Navy as well as co-designed the first digital microprocessor to ever be used by the Navy on a submarine (so I would call him a reliable source), I guess we can agree to disagree.
     
  9. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

    Reputations:
    4,882
    Messages:
    17,088
    Likes Received:
    20,986
    Trophy Points:
    931
    So he agrees that you should disassemble your brand new laptop merely to make it cooler for longer life? I find it odd that a person with that experience, not unlike my own, would think that wise.

    There is no reason to disassemble a non-thermal throttling laptop just to reduce temperatures for longer life.

    You won't have it long enough for that to make any difference at all to you personally.

    Even if you keep it for 5 years that is well within the lifespan even running in the 90c's.

    The end of it's competitive advantage is probably over in 6-12 months, and the latest you should try to get the most resale value back is 18 months, so it really makes no economic sense either.

    Wise experienced technical people will tell you that above all:

    If it ain't broke, don't fix it. :D
     
  10. pitha1337

    pitha1337 Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    19
    Messages:
    107
    Likes Received:
    57
    Trophy Points:
    41
    Just repasted my ASUS GX501 with liquid metal. Dropped the temps as expected. Hovering around 75-80C on GPU and CPU under full load. Also I have undervolted the CPU -120mv. ECO Mode ist off in ROG Center.

    Do you have any other tuning tipps to get the best out of the ASUS, especially the GPU ?
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2018
Loading...

Share This Page