Asus ROG GL702ZC owners lounge

Discussion in 'Asus' started by Deks, Oct 16, 2017.

  1. Deks

    Deks Notebook Virtuoso

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    I got an update from someone else at Asus to my last email (I still hadn't sent them revised questions on what you hmscott wrote) :

    "Thank you for your email.

    Yes, as long as nothing is damaged or screws misplaced, the warranty would be unaffected.

    In regards to the RAM speed - it works slightly different as generally laptop mainboards have other chipsets.
    And most notebooks don't allow changing the timings/latency settings on RAM. And everything above 2133MHz/2400MHz even on system board is considered overclocking and might not be stable.

    And notebooks are not tested as motherboards are with a QVL list - so we would advise to use 2400MHz/2133MHz memory for the sodimms"

    Huh... so if I'm interpreting the first sentence accurately, as long as I don't damage anything inside the laptop or misplace any screws, warranty remains unaffected.
    Curious.
    Does that mean I can re-paste?
    Hehe... might be easily interpreted as that, but I will be sending another ticket with that question by copy/pasting hmscott's example directly.

    As for the RAM, well, he doesn't say that 3000 MhZ wouldn't work in the laptop... just that they aren't tested with those speeds.
    So, it likely remains up to me to try out 3000 MhZ RAM and see if it would work in this machine. I wasn't asking about changing timings/latency on the RAM though, so I don't know what he included that, but I already knew about not being able to change the timings and latency seeing how the BIOS/UEFI is effectively locked
     
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  2. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Yup, that looks good, and you can follow up as you like, but I would address it to him (his ID) so you can converse with him directly.

    The RAM answer basically means he doesn't know, but falls back on the company default supported speeds. Or, he does know and he is telling you not to waste your time.

    If you do get a few matched sets of SODIMM's at higher speeds, please let us know how they work out.

    Have fun :)
     
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  3. Durval

    Durval Newbie

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    Hello everyone,

    I'm very interested in buying one of these laptops, basically because I really want ECC in a portable machine. The Ryzen CPU supports ECC, not "officially" but AMD says it's there and it's just a matter of the computer's motherboard routing all of the memory modules' lines to the CPU, and the BIOS enabling it if present.

    Is this the case with this notebook? Has anyone tested, or at least entered the BIOS settings and looking for any setting mentioning ECC?

    Thanks in advance,
    --
    Durval.
     
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  4. Deks

    Deks Notebook Virtuoso

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    I entered the BIOS but I didn't notice anything regarding ECC.
    I could recheck again, but the BIOS/UEFI is pretty much locked because OEM's usually use outdated cooling methodologies in laptops (copper pipes and fans) and don't allow overclocking.
    This is one of the reasons they lock UEFI... even though most people wouldn't really overclock the laptops to begin with (tweak maybe by undervolting, etc., but overclocking would be relatively limited with existing/ancient cooling).

    I could raise a support ticked with Asus and ask them about ECC support.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2017
  5. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Ancient? I think you mean "state of the art", for "cavemen" it's pretty darned good. ;)
    @Durval
    You could try ECC memory, and see if it works...
    That's the best way to go about it, but they might not know either. So I'd add to the question / ticket to Asus - please try this in house, plug in ECC memory and let me know if it works.

    It's unfortunately the case with laptops that QVL charts of tested / supported memory aren't published, the answers are still of interest though, so ask Asus specifically about testing ECC in house.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2017
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  6. Deks

    Deks Notebook Virtuoso

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    No, I mean its ancient next to other cooling methods we developed over the past several decades. Heck we could adjust current cooling to use more passive-like methods with superior synthetic materials and eliminate fans all together.
    Copper is inefficient next to synthetic diamonds for example... graphene and carbon nanotubes. A synthetic composite of those carbon forms (Along with various connections on the CPU using the same materials - or even using meta-materials which we developed as far back in the 1970-ies... aerospace materials for example wouldn't need to be used in ridiculous amounts - we can use minuscule amounts and create viable composits - so, if we can make a space shuttle to withstand atmospheric entry and the material can stay cool to the touch while being searing hot in the middle, I think we can develop passive cooling that would keep all hardware at low temperatures without using fans... btw, I was talking about a thermal tile:


    A similar method could be used to develop vastly improved cooling.
    The temperatures showed in the video were orders of magnitude greater (2200 deg C) than what is being generated in a laptop or a desktop for that matter - however, yes, in mobile devices, notebooks, etc. the purpose is to take heat AWAY from the components... but there's no reason to think you can't create a similar material that conducts heat away and insulates the rest of the nearby components from it as well.

    Let's face it... OEM's are LAZY and CHEAP when it comes to designing viable cooling systems. They also probably want to keep laptops 'restricted' in a certain way, even though they can be easily designed to be fully modular and easy to service/maintain/upgrade.
    Also, there's no real reason such a cooling system would need to be 'expensive'.
    OEM's slap in an imaginary price (like material suppliers do) on it just because they can.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2017
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  7. Deks

    Deks Notebook Virtuoso

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    One of the other things not published are UEFI/BIOS update changes (specifically what was done to 'optimize performance' etc.).
    I mean its absurd.
    How are we supposed to know if AGESA 1.0.0.6 or 1.0.0.7 will be integrated?
    Are Asus announcing it for specific motherboards (when it comes to desktops) or something else?
    The UEFI/BIOS update changes aren't included for desktop mobos either in a text file (this is a bit odd as I remember that older mobo manufacturers did include what was changed).
     
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  8. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    If it's not being done, there are likely good reasons. Specialty designs meant for weight savings, size considerations, and supporting new manufacturing technologies are different than what's needed for mass production.

    The means of production need to be easily available, well understood, and have a low barrier to entry.

    It may or may not happen to be necessary to get fancy with those new potentialities given all the steps necessary to implement them on an industry wide scale.

    Things move a lot slower in real life than the speed of our thoughts.

    I knew what was coming for the internet, at least I could imagine the possibilities back in the 70's, and it took until the '90's for any of it to start to have a glimmer of public awareness, to the point that I could say, "hey, ****'s finally coming together"... and now it's 20 more years further down the road, and for me nothing has conceptually changed since the internet of the '70's.

    New names and rearrangement's for the same concepts, faster speeds, smaller physical instantiations of technology, broader awareness - but not much increase in understanding - other than what is necessary to "press the button" or "click the icon".

    If you want it to happen, you have to do it yourself. :)
     
  9. Deks

    Deks Notebook Virtuoso

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    Those are the inefficiencies of living in a monetary system which is slow to the point of moving at a proverbial crawl because something is perceived to be 'monetarily expensive' and 'cost prohibitive' to introduce.
    However, technologically, science and resource wise, we CAN make it in sustainable abundance for everyone in a very small time frame with very small impact to the environment.
    Cost efficiency and profits have nothing to do with our ability to create something in sustainable abundance for everyone, with minimal impact to the environment and in a very small time frame.

    Nasa also developed detailed schematics and methods for creating large fully self sustaining orbital habitats in the 1970-ies using science, technology and materials available at the time. O'Neil cilinders actually... for a cost of about $30 billion back then, which amounts to roughly $200 billion today (or 4.5 times less than what the USA funds its military for) - and it included transportation of necessary materials into orbit, etc.
    1970-ies.

    The amount of patents we can see on the Internet and what kind of methodologies were created at the turn of the 20th century alone (nevermind the mid 20th century) is staggering in itself and would put many methods we use TODAY to shame.
    Maglev trains in vacuumed tubes achieving speeds of 2000 miles per hour were possible to construct in a decade across the globe if we used full scale automation to do it.
    Capitalism is playing catch-up... but by integrating more and more automation, it will inevitably eliminate itself by around 2030.
    Even now, automation replaced over 90% of the workforce in various factories that make mobile phones, laptops, etc... improving quality and reducing failure rate (that's of course using planned obsolescence and inferior materials we use now).
     
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  10. xsais

    xsais Notebook Enthusiast

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    Since you got the laptop has it increased your electricity usage/bill?
     
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