Asus ROG GL702ZC owners lounge

Discussion in 'ASUS Reviews and Owners' Lounges' started by Deks, Oct 16, 2017.

  1. terexo

    terexo Notebook Enthusiast

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    All (ok - mostly all) screens for laptops is 6 bit. Not even 8 bit. Even if it "upscaled" to 16m colors. The factory screen is pretty good. I don't know what you can install here. For color works etc you need ext. monitor anyway (my personal opinion). For casual usage I'm happy with factory one (AMD limited RGB is cool feature).
     
  2. Caretaker01

    Caretaker01 Notebook Geek

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    Actually the color calibration of the screen is a bit off, using a spyder calibration tool to properly calibrate the screen I found that, but as at least for my unit the screen was a bit to warm in color accuracy, once I switched the calibration on the screen goes to a greener hue, at first glance, after I get used to it and turn the calibration off it hits you like window's 10 night mode filter, an external monitor for graphic work is mandatory
    Sent from my MI 5s Plus using Tapatalk
     
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  3. mcalago

    mcalago Notebook Guru

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    I am also very curious about this mobo "fry" thing. Can someone please explain that?
     
  4. Deks

    Deks Notebook Prophet

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    Please keep us posted on your efforts to bring new microcode updates to GL702ZC so we can install 2700x and 7nm Zen2 into it.
    Question.. would those microcode updates also include support for faster RAM?

    And how would you go about installing the said BIOS onto the laptop (and is there a method to recover the old one should something fail?) and how did you manage to get it to work on this motherboard considering its a modified desktop one?

    P.S. Where did you get the needed microcode updates for slipstreaming into the existing BIOS? Furthermore, if its that easy, why doesn't Asus bother with it?
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2018
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  5. Deks

    Deks Notebook Prophet

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    1) Possible? Probably, but not sure its worth it. Just recalibrate the colors.

    2) Probably the inadequate cooling in early units and not so well designed cooling to begin with.
    It wasn't a 'fried mobo' technically, just the component that regulated auto fan spin ups and downs.

    3) 1 configuration with the heatpipes not going over the RAM sticks is actually how the laptop was designed for the version with 1600 CPU. The cooling with heatpipes going over the RAM slots is designed for 1700 CPU version of the laptop.
    -Whether Asus decided to switch the cooling units to the 1600 version remains to be seen.

    4) I think the safest what works thus far would be 2600MhZ RAM... your best bet would be getting low latency 2600MhZ ram in that case.
     
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  6. mhdvt

    mhdvt Notebook Enthusiast

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    Current generation isn't of a super high importance to me, definitely more interested in zen2 7nm.

    I haven't even looked at ram yet, so not comment sorry.

    Bios is installed via external flasher (raspberry pi model b in my case). When using an external flasher you can recover from brick easily. There is also a method of flashing from Unix command line (from a running desktop) with flashrom if you remove the write lock (allow signed vendor bios only) when you flash externally for the first time, which saves disassembling the laptop each time you want to flash. Yes you can revert to stock bios anytime you wish either by flashing with the raspberry pi or via Asus flash tool in BIOS etc.

    Asus etc don't do bios work themselves. Its outsourced to the likes of AMI (American Megatrends) at $$$ cost. Then Asus test it internally at further $$$ cost, and then it may need further tweaking at more $$$ cost. All this before public release where if it bricks machines or causes issues it can cost them more money. Laptops like ours have small userbase compared to desktop boards, hence more frequent releases for desktops. And for hackers/tweakers like us, we don't have to spend money but we also get to keep the pieces if things break (not anything to worry about if you're just doing some sane bios mods).

    I've taken microcode and agesa files from ASUS B350 desktop board (roughly the same as ours) and also from the Linux firmware repository that AMD etc commit microcode to.

    Speaking of mods, how much of an overclock do we think is achievable with the RX580? And what voltages and power would we need for it? If we can start a discussion on this then I can do some testing.

    Cheers
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2018
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  7. Snappy_Darko

    Snappy_Darko Notebook Enthusiast

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    Thanks for all the responses. All sounds positive.

    I also read on an Amazon review that the "The HDMI output produces a overscanned pictures" and that there's "no Radeon driver to resize the HDMI output image"...is this true?

    RE the screen. It's pretty important to me and I think that 83% srgb is actually the result of it being calibrated already, so not ideal for my needs - I have a great panel for my desktop, but i'd need better accuracy for the travelling work, as it would just end up making more work when I get home. I've seen that the Lenovo Thinkpad P71 has a great screen at the same size. Think i'll scout around to see what the dangers of swapping out the screen are, maybe it's been done on other laptops - also a replacement lenovo screen on ebay is only 50 euros, may be worth a try.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2018
  8. Andrew H

    Andrew H Newbie

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    Good evening everyone.
    So about a month ago, I was on the fence about upgrading my old desktop with a Ryzen-based system, or getting the ASUS GL702ZC, and finally determined that portability was going to be the deciding factor. Plus, this is really the only modern laptop that totes actual desktop hardware in it.

    So far my experience has been better than expected. One of the first things I did was remove the crappy stock thermal... goop, and put Arctic Silver on everything. I do plan to Liquid Metal the CPU and GPU later on after a few more things.

    I originally kept combing this board to see what is the maximum speed RAM this machine can run. With RAM prices still being completely stupid, and I'm not exactly liking single channel memory, I wanted to upgrade that next. Seem the consensus is that 2,666mhz RAM is the safe maximum, so thanks to all of you for that.

    However... ASUS' customer support is... less than desired. My machine came with a broken P key. So, I naturally emailed ASUS about it, seeing if I can at least get a new key or board to replace. The only option is to send it in, and pay like $500 USD. Really? So I ordered a replacement off Ebay, its for the other model numbers in the series (without the ASUS Game Center button), and going to see if thats compatible. I didn't have much luck with a keyboard replacement with my old MSI laptop so I'm hoping that at least this will work.
    I rarely used the onboard keyboard since this is, a desktop replacement so I have a Type-C hub I use as a dock.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    So kinda sad on ASUS' part there.

    Now, one thing that does amaze me, is how well my Ryzen 7 1700 behaves. I used the Ryzen Master utility and set a profile to default it up to 3.7ghz, which is its rated speed anyway, since they have it set to 3.2ghz stock. With just a fan mat, and the thermal paste re-application, this processor self boosts sustained between 4.5 and 4.7ghz. I do understand that the older version of SenseMI only overclocks 2 cores, but I was playing Cities; Skylines, which is a decently CPU intensive game.

    [​IMG]

    Now I'm going to keep my eye on things here on this forum too, because if there is a way to at least unlock the RX 580 on this thing, I'd be willing to try it. The most I can do is set the GPU's power limit to +50%. I clearly have tons of thermal headroom, and probably a smidge more once I liquid metal the processor and graphics processor. Granted I play many games maxed out at good framerates at 2560x1080, and even some titles like Farcry 5 maxed out at 3440x1440 so a boosted GPU isn't completely necessary, but if I can do it, I will.

    Thats really all I gotta say about this as my introduction to the owners club here. Its a solid machine, even if the build quality is less than par and the support isn't very impressive, what do you expect, its the only desktop-grade laptop ASUS made, and I highly doubt they'll support it any more, which is why I always look up to the owners and modding community like this one, who are amazing at what they do.
     
  9. yrekabakery

    yrekabakery Notebook Deity

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    That software is reading the CPU clock incorrectly, probably 1GHz higher than actual.
     
  10. Deks

    Deks Notebook Prophet

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    I have to agree with @yrekabakery on this one.
    The software is likely reporting your clocks incorrectly (by about 1 GhZ too much).
    Ryzen 1700 has a standard base clock speed of 3GhZ.
    All core boost is restrained to 3.2GhZ (default for this CPU even on desktop), while 3.7GhZ is 1 core boost.

    At stock voltages, you could get the CPU to run at 3.7GhZ across all cores... some 1700's can do that with a lower than stock voltage... for some reason I think Asus might have used low silicon quality chips in this laptop... at least for the first batch.

    Aside from that, you won't get a lot of thermal headroom on this laptop.
    Putting in LM might help things in that regard yes, but you'd need to make sure to apply proper thermal pads onto the VRM's and VRAM chips. LM would likely be best used on the CPU and GPU.

    As for overclocking the RX 580... maybe if we unlock the BIOS... but even then I think the best bet would be to try and flash a desktop RX 580 4GB BIOS onto this one... and I wouldn't recommend overclocking it since Asus never really paid that much attention to cooling here.
    They restricted the RX 580 to 68W... and even then, GPU temps could go up as high as 88 degrees C when the GPU is fully stressed without an undervolt.
    Undervolting the GPU can drop those temperatures by 10 degrees C easily (to 77/78 degrees C).

    Your experience with their customer service is atrocious though.
    Didn't you get a standard warranty with the laptop that should cover this sort of thing? I think in the USA its 2 years (the ones here in UK are usually 1 year, but I was fortunate to get mine from LaptopsDirect and at the time, they offered a 2 year warranty right out of the box).
    Then again, I suspect Asus is requesting $500 off you because they might think you damaged the keyboard as opposed to the laptop coming in like that (and they have no way of verifying it).
    Honestly that was really bad of them. A laptop as expensive as this one should get far superior customer service (not to mention it should have had superior cooling implemented from the get go).


    If it helps, I was able to unlock Wattman capabiltiy under Windows by following instructions from someone else on AMD community.
    Can't affect the core voltages through it because once I hit apply, the frequencies and voltages go back to what they were originally set to, however, I can affect the memory Voltages (was able to drop them from 1000mV to 968mV on stock 2000 MhZ).
    I can couple that with MSI afterburner which allows a core undervolt by -93mV.

    I'm copy pasting the answer:
    I got it: after installing MSI afterburner, and playing with it, it didnt seem to work because everything was enabled and no change to the lack of wattman, but after I fully disabled all options(and I mean, all, one by one) in the afterburner main settings page, then reenabled them as seen in the images(the enabling of the io settings had to happen first followed by afterburner restarting, then after reloading the afterburner disabled the ULPS and rebooted the pc) when it came back up, wattman had reappeared and afterburner is also working without conflict, though I intend to remove afterburner for now as my desired outcome was to have a working wattman again.


    But for the life of me I can't figure out how he got all 7 P states to show up.
    Might be a flashed VBIOS from a desktop RX 580 4GB, but not sure.
     

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