Asus ROG GL702ZC owners lounge

Discussion in 'ASUS Reviews and Owners' Lounges' started by Deks, Oct 16, 2017.

  1. Deks

    Deks Notebook Prophet

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    AMD did officially start recognizing the issue and since then amended their reports of power draw.
    Also, AMD is a much smaller company with fewer resources... it might be one of the reasons they did this with power monitoring circuitry.
    Besides, Nvidia has a tendency to draw much more power beyond their stated TDP as well when stressed, and certain things aren't being reported either.

    At any rate, undervoltng AMD GPU's works, and it cuts power consumption by quite a lot. We also know that a slight underclock can also help bring down power consumption further as the manuf. process (14nmLPP) is not Polaris or Vega's friend in regards to clocks and power draw (however, it is also worth noting that AMD managed to achieve SAME performance with lower clocks than Nvidia does, indicating higher IPC, but at said clocks, the manuf. process works against them, which resulted in lower yields, producing higher power draw in the process - and also the fact AMD introduced higher number of compute units on their GPU's).


    Here you go:


    Also, I should have been more precise in saying that equalizing for clocks did not affect GAMING performance between V56 and 64...
    Obviously in compute tasks, there would be a performance difference in V64 favor...
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2018
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  2. Deks

    Deks Notebook Prophet

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    I know that the A10 wasn't as powerful as the Intel cpu portion was, but even crippling the 7970m, it provided a relatively good performance.
    MSI still priced the G60 too much, and the fact that they included only a single RAM stick (which is how the laptop was tested) and had no SSD in it didn't help the performance numbers.

    AMD APU's (both CPU and iGP) do depend quite a bit on whether RAM is running in single or dual-channel mode... along with RAM speeds and latencies (low latency and high speed RAM worked best).
    Here's something else to look into for A10 4600M (the same trinity based APU used in G60) :
    http://forum.notebookreview.com/thr...ested-with-various-ram-configurations.712179/

    As you can see, running dual channel does affect performance on APU's, usually on their iGP, but it also affects CPU performance somewhat, and we don't know how much of an impact there might have been on dGPU as a result of A10 having access to dual-channel and more bandwidth.
    Most of the Trinity and other APU configurations were tested with single-channel RAM which affected performance for the worse in games... this could have also translated to CPU related tasks given how dependent those apus were on RAM and bandwidth they provided.
     
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  3. yrekabakery

    yrekabakery Notebook Deity

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    Can you elaborate? One of the points Buildzoid made in the video was that Nvidia does have accurate power monitoring compared to AMD. The GPU Power sensor in HWiNFO (read through NvML API) is a pretty accurate total board power for Nvidia and is used for GPU Boost 3.0. Instantaneous spikes above the power limit are possible in power viruses like FurMark, but for better or worse, Pascal sticks very tightly to its set power limit.

    Well no, the GX60/70 was less expensive than similarly configured Intel+Nvidia GT60/70 with a better CPU and worse GPU, as mentioned in the review. Also, the other GX60 with A10-4600M had dual channel RAM and SSD and it didn't really affect gaming performance: https://www.anandtech.com/show/7111/amds-a105750m-review-part-2-the-msi-gx60-gaming-notebook/4
     
  4. tkalfaoglu

    tkalfaoglu Notebook Enthusiast

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    i am using it with Fedora. i managed to get the recent kernels compatible with our touchpad.. other than that, no big issues. Very happy with it

    Sent from my MHA-L29 using Tapatalk
     
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  5. mhdvt

    mhdvt Notebook Enthusiast

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    Have you managed to get the touchpad working on Win7 yet? I haven't put too much effort into it as I've been busy and just using a mouse, but it seems like it's I2C connection and we need a driver for it.
     
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  6. terexo

    terexo Notebook Enthusiast

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    Forgot about touchpad. Unfortunately I don't find a solution for working touchpad. But I don't really searching good because I use only mouse or (very rare) I just use keyboard. Have you tried to search drivers by device ID from device manager or just install drivers by Asus (they might fit Win7 as well)?
    -
    Also need mention about GPU work on Windows 7. So I don't find a way to get FreeSync to work (even find a way to hardly install (TM) RX580 with BSOD). BUT another thing is that on Win7 GPU is loud. I mean in SOME applications (standart Chess or old games like Max Payne) the drossels (I think) make a noticeable squeaking sound. Really don't know why and how to fix it. For now I'm on Windows 10 LTSB 2016 and everything just fine. Maybe later I will work around again with Windows 7 (still it's fully working, with no difference in performance and even better in some situations).
     
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  7. mhdvt

    mhdvt Notebook Enthusiast

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    Yeah I spent a couple hours looking at it yesterday - no luck for it as far as I can tell. I got everything (including the wireless radio control and ROG center etc) working apart from FreeSync and the touchpad. Windows 7 seems to lack I2C support and the driver we need is ELAN 1203.

    Like you I ended up reverting to LTSB. I've been playing with DXVK on Linux recently too, and it looks like I may be able to dump Windows for gaming now :)
     
  8. Erik C. Stubblebine

    Erik C. Stubblebine Notebook Guru

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    I just rolled back my update as well. Same issues.
     
  9. mcalago

    mcalago Notebook Guru

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  10. Deks

    Deks Notebook Prophet

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    Hm... you provided a link to an i5-8400 version... though you did mention its a barebone system... so I take it that you would be able to upgrade to the i7-8700?
    If that's the case, it would be a tough call.

    Depends on your preferences really.
    The Intel/Nvidia laptop might be more efficient and equally fast as the GL702ZC with 1700 because the Intel CPU uses a better manuf. process which allows all 6 cores to clock higher than 1700 does when all cores are stressed.

    However, the Intel CPU might also hit thermal throttling a lot easier (due to having a bad thermal paste underneath the lid), so that could easily affect performance for the worse on the Clevo laptop.

    Also, you can easily undervolt and overclock the 1700 in GL702ZC using Ryzen Master to increase its efficiency and performance (I'm usually running 3.3GhZ on all cores when I'm using software that stresses them to that level - but I could likely increase that to 3.4 or 3.5GhZ with stock or slightly lower voltages out of the box) - Intel's CPU's don't seem to overclock well without de-lidding (and as I already mentioned, they seem to throttle easily)... though, they COULD be undervolted out of the box (I think) as well using proper software, so if you did that, you wouldn't have to de-lid or re-apply the thermal paste (at least, not initially).

    As for the GPU comparison... both RX 580 and GTX 1060 (6GB) will be relatively identical to each other. The RX 580 uses less power than the 1060 mobile but produces pretty much equal performance (plus, latest drivers are working great)... and of course, there's Freesync on GL702ZC for smooth gameplay.

    So, the main difference between the two systems are:
    1. you get Freesync on GL702ZC
    2. you can easily undervolt and overclock the 1700 to increase performance and reduce power consumption (though, the i7-8700 should be able to at least undervolt too).
    3. you can easily undervolt the RX 580 too to further decrease power consumption and reduce noise during gaming.

    Mind you, Asus did say they will release a BIOS with security updates for Ryzen, however, they said they won't include an update so we can upgrade to Ryzen 2700.
    Nothing was said about releasing an update to support Zen 2 though (7nm).
    I'm hoping if most of us GL702ZC owners can show higher adoption of desktop components into laptops (such as the upcoming Acer 2700 with Vega 56), Asus 'might' be prompted to include future bios microcode updates so we can upgrade the CPU to 7nm 8c/16th (which should run at 4.2 GhZ stock, and 4.4 to 4.6GhZ boost across all cores... with 1 core boosting to 5 GhZ likely) in the same 65W TDP.

    I'd also look into the premise if the Clevo offers upgrades to future CPU's and GPU's.
    Most likely you might be stuck with 8700 CPU... but do check if the GTX 1060 is replaceable.
     
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