Asus ROG GL702ZC owners lounge

Discussion in 'Asus' started by Deks, Oct 16, 2017.

  1. Caretaker01

    Caretaker01 Notebook Guru

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    Hope you get what you seek in purchasing this laptop, I have no experience in video editing but if it's spec's required are similar to 3d rendering softwares then this is a beast, and using some of Deks OC tips you could shave 20-30 % off of export time's

    Sent from my MI 5s Plus using Tapatalk
     
  2. Technooby

    Technooby Notebook Enthusiast

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    Thank you! I've never done any OCing but when this thing finally gets here I'll be reading through Deks posts more thoroughly and will try to take advantage of that performance boost. Many thanks again for the link I'm going to place my order now!
     
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  3. Technooby

    Technooby Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hey @hmscott when My Gl702zc comes in do you have any suggestions for setup? Specific things to install/uninstall? updates to do? I read a post by you about taking a recovery image on a flash drive before connecting to the internet. Any chance you could elaborate on how to do that a bit for someone who has never done so? Thanks again to all of you on this forum!
     
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  4. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    The guys with a GL702zc already in their hands would be a better choice for input, and I've already spoken with them here in the thread with my generic suggestions for Asus laptops, so read the older posts here to get that and their feedback. Then if you have specific questions not already answered - or not answered to your need - please post them and there are a number of people like me that can help :)

    My most important generic recommendations are:

    1) Backup your OS install with either the vendor too - like Asus Backtracker or MSI BurnRecovery (32GB USB 3.0 flash drive), and also with a generic OS/partition imaging tool like Macrium Reflect (Free) using their restore USB boot recovery - usually a 4GB drive and then your OS image backed up to a USB 3.0 HDD/SSD. Get the flash drives ordered with your laptop or pick them up locally before delivery so you won't be tempted to go online - with Windows seeking out updates - before doing the backup. Really you want to wait till you have the OS recovery image backed up before going online. Even if the Windows updates don't affect the recovery partition they still effect the OS and support for the image backup tool, with many reporting it doesn't work after Windows 10 updates are done, so do the backup first before going online.

    The vendor apps are easy to use. Run app, plug in your USB 3.0 32GB flash drive (or plug it in before running the app, up to you), select it in the app, and backup - usually takes 10-about 20 minutes with a USB 3.0 flash drive, and an hour plus with a USB 2.0 flash drive... it's worth getting a fast USB 3.0 flash drive. :)

    Get a nice fast USB 3.0 32GB flash drive, or get 2 and make 2 backups, that's what I do and keep 1 in the original box taped to the lid, and one on my desk for use. Drives die with infant mortality in the first days or weeks too, so some report getting caught out without anything to make a backup of, and have to return it or RMA it to get a new drive - when if you did the backup first thing you could just buy a larger SSD and restore it yourself, saving the weeks of return or RMA back and forth.

    2) After backing up you can do several things at your desire. Play games right away to get an idea of how it is working. Watching the temperatures and fan operation in the vendor monitoring software - Asus ROG Gaming Center or MSI Dragon Gaming Center, and see how things run in general.

    3) Within the 2 weeks or so you have for a return for refund, check out all the ports and features of the laptop to make sure they are working well and there are no cosmetic defects - bad joins, creaky assembly, bad keys on the keyboard, bad lettering or lighting effects, so you'll be happy accepting the laptop long term.

    4) I take the time to go a bit further and run benchmarks to find the base performance out of the box. Then I install Intel Extreme Tuning Utility ( or you can use ThrottleStop supported right here on NBR by unclewebb's The ThrottleStop Guide thread ) to undervolt the Intel CPU at stock speeds to reduce the 100% load temperature 10c by undervolting -100mV - some CPU's will undervolt more some a little less.

    5) Same goes for overclocking or undervolting the (Nvidia) GPU as well, Asus has GPU Tweak, but I usually use MSI's tool AfterBurner + RTSS (to limit FPS instead of Vsync). GPU Tweak has had a couple of divergent versions over the years, so find the right one for your laptop, there should be a download in the support area for your laptop, or already installed.

    In the case of the GL702ZC you'll want to look at posts here to figure out which AMD tool to download, I think the ThreadRipper version of the Wattman tool is what works on this build.

    6) If you have a problem, return it for another unit or get your money back to order from somewhere else in stock. Don't waste time trying to fix problems yourself, it can be an easy success or a long term headache without future warranty support. It's better to get what you pay for than trying to turn a sow's ear into a silk purse, many here will attest to that.

    If you wait too long to return it, you can get denied - usually it's 7 - 14 days, check your receipt or vendor for the easy return period. They may suggest RMA'ing to get a problem out of the box fixed, but that can take weeks, so it's not the best way to resolve this. RMA is fine months later, as that's your only choice, but in the first week or two of ownership, the acceptance period you can return for cause (problem) without restocking fee. If you just don't like it, and there are no defects - real or cosmetic, then you will be charged a restocking fee - so make sure whatever you order you have found out enough about it before ordering to *know* you'll be happy with it, or be ok with being charged a hefty restocking fee - usually 10%-20%.

    I think that's about it from me for now, but read all the posts in the thread and maybe even some other new Asus laptop Owner support threads, and learn all you can before ordering.

    Have fun! :)
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2018
  5. fizikz

    fizikz Notebook Consultant

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    What's the reason for this? Is there anything irretrievable in the vendor's installation?

    My thought was actually the opposite: after initial testing to make sure the unit is not defective, install any upgrades (SSD, RAM, etc), then wipe everything and start with clean OS installs, and choose which vendor tools I install, if any.
     
  6. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    That's exactly how so many get caught without a download for some utilities or apps with laptops. :)

    Quite often, mostly in fact, the support areas only have updates for apps and utilities and drivers, not the full set of what came in the original out of the box install.

    So you end up trying to download vendor OEM drivers from other sources for the things you can't download from the builder of the laptop. And, often enough they won't work, or work the same.

    A good example is the MSI Realtek / Nahimic pairing of drivers where the only ones that work at the ones that MSI bundles into a package of both to download and install, in a specific order of uninstall and install.

    If you can't quite fathom this, you aren't alone. So many times new owners blow away the "bloatware ridden" OS that their laptop came with, without backing it up first, assuming they can do a better job of installing Windows and configuring it - better than the paid engineers that have worked for years at the vendor and have gained expertise into a build / imaging cycle for generating a stable OS out of the box for new owners.

    It's much easier and quicker to uninstall any "bloatware" you don't want, like the Norton / McAfee trial security software, or some Asus specific store app, but there are usually apps, utilities, and drivers installed in that image that aren't available for download, so don't immediately uninstall everything until you find out if you can download it from the builder support site :)

    Even if you think you "know it all" and have done this dozens of times on desktops, believe me that there are things you don't know that can hurt your joy of owning the new laptop if you don't think things through before blowing them away.

    It only costs $20-$30 for a 32GB USB 3.0 flash drive, and 10-20 minutes to back it up, then you are covered in case you need it later.

    Even if you get a good build on your own, when you RMA the laptop Asus / MSI will want you to restore the original image and test to see if the problem still exists - a sanity check to make sure it's hardware and not your custom software install that's messing things up.

    When you sell the laptop you'll want to blow away your build and personal files, and it's very easy to restore the out of the box OS image in a few minutes so that the new owner starts with a known working OS, putting them back in control of what is loaded as you were when buying the laptop new.

    You'd be surprised how many people come back begging for someone to make a backup image of their laptop for them to download... it's sad, but too much effort on anyones part to do, don't ask if that happens to you, it won't be met with sympathy.

    The builder won't send you a copy of the image, you'll be required to RMA the whole laptop, not just the disk for re-imaging.

    If you accidentally blow away the OS image in the first 7-14 days of ownership, it's best to return the laptop and get another one that you can backup.

    I hope that helps you understand, there are lots of other nuances to consider, but just understand it's easier to just backup the image for when you want it again, instead of not doing it. :)
     
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  7. fizikz

    fizikz Notebook Consultant

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    Wwwwwow. All I can say is that is some serious insanity if vendors don't make all the software available for download or on drivers discs (remember those?)...

    Does this backup have to be to a usb flash drive? I'd be tempted to dump an image onto an external hdd. And what about those hidden vendor partitions?

    And again, wow. No, really. Wow.
     
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  8. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    The vendor app bundles it all up into a single USB 3.0 flash drive so there is no benefit to getting a large USB 3.0 flash drive than it needs - currently just over 19GB or 32GB in standard size availability - 16GB used to be enough.

    The newer MSI BurnRecovery lets you create a DVD restore media - IDK about the Asus Backtracker, but I haven't tried that. The USB 3.0 is cheap and fast enough to not worry about alternatives. But, feel free to try the DVD method too :)

    The Macrium Reflect tool makes a small bootable flash drive only for booting and running the restore utility, so with that you can use a USB 3.0 HDD or SSD in an external case, or get a large USB 3.0 flash drive to hold both the boot and image data all in one. A 256GB Patriot USB 3.0 drive would probably be big enough for the compressed image, but it can grow much bigger, there are now larger USB 3.0 flash drives, or you could re-purpose a 512GB-1TB SSD as an external drive for Macrium backup images.

    I recommend disconnecting all USB drives from the laptop before doing a restore, all except the recovery boot flash drive, mishaps with selecting the wrong drive have happened and people have lost the contents of their external USB drives during a restore.

    Same goes for restoring to the internal SSD, the app will by default format and re-partition all the internal drives, so pull any not used for the restore, and backup the data on the HDD that gets the recovery partition as it will get reformatted and re-partitioned too!!

    Also, don't test the restore onto the original boot drive... why? Because if the USB media didn't succeed - which has happened before, it says it created and worked ok, but then upon using it for restore it will say "can't find recovery media", and your original boot drive has already been formatted and partitioned before the app discovers the recovery image isn't there... yipe, right? Seen a few people caught out that way. Always pull your original drive and restore to a test / new drive when restoring for the first time with newly created recovery media... so many details, right? :)

    Yeah, it's caught many people out, these little gotchas, you have to think like a professional backup person and know all the gaps of coverage in order to cover yourself 100%.

    That's why I do a vendor backup onto 2 media I know work, and keep image backups using Macrium Reflect (Free) on a regular basis.

    It's no fun always restore to the out of the box configuration and then building it backup to how you like it with updates, apps, and configuration tweaks, so back that up too, your stages to 100% and finally a 100% "perfect" build, and then incrementals or fulls weekly, so in case of emergency - or a "lost" laptop, you can recovery from the disaster quickly with your working set intact.

    A little pre-thought and pre-readiness effort will reward you in the long run.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2018
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  9. Technooby

    Technooby Notebook Enthusiast

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    Jeez @hmscott you are the man. Thanks for the lengthily response and all of the tips. Sorry I've read through the entire 50 pages of this and have started mixing up names, I thought you owned one of these. Unfortunately not being the best with all of this technical stuff I wasn't able to fully take in some of the great info previously posted. I might track out to @Deks and some others for help with bios stuff and needed updates. Again really appreciate you taking the time to relay all of that info. Last question for you. Will the computer prompt me to "make an image" (is that just another way of saying backup or is this something different?) or is the a setting I'll need to enter to create the image?
     
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  10. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    The new MSI's do have a "nag" dialog that pops up to chide the owner constantly to do the BurnRecovery Backup :)

    The Asus did too, but Backtracker App changed since I've used it with Windows 8.1... I haven't setup Windows 10 on Asus, but I've setup enough Windows 10 to know that with Windows 10 you need to *not* connect to the internet when getting it or it will overwrite the original OS install immediately, and I've seen people complain that the MSI BurnRecovery app won't work after they updated - this can vary depending on the OS image on the laptop and where in the update cycle Windows 10 is at the time you boot up first time... so it's important to get the backup done before setting up the laptop online.

    The last 2 MSI's I set up were backed up immediately upon first boot offline, the MSI BurnRecovery dialog comes right up upon first entry into the system - you should set up a local login during set up - you cancel or select a local login set up option in Windows 10. And, not set up the "networks", be careful to not get tricked into doing that, as even while you are still setting up your account Windows 10 update will be running.

    Deks and new GL702ZC owner's can help you with additional tips and tricks for setup, tuning, and use.

    Please let us know your Asus experiences :)
     
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