Asus G73SW DC Jack Repair Tutorial

Discussion in 'ASUS Gaming Notebook Forum' started by C4RN1, Aug 2, 2012.

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  1. LaxGrip

    LaxGrip Newbie

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    Thanks so much :D I'll take it to him tomorrow and keep you updated
     
  2. C4RN1

    C4RN1 Notebook Consultant

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    Any update yet?
     
  3. smellon

    smellon Notebook Evangelist

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    i never got around to thanking you for this tut. i bit the bullet and did it. it took a while but everything worked out. unfortunately about 2 months ago the connection became loose so i had to buy a new jack and re-solder it again. do you have any tips to make it more permanent? its really difficult because my solder iron has the thickness of a sharpee when the solder points are tiny..

    the solder collects into a big glob on the iron and its difficult to get precise points..
     
  4. C4RN1

    C4RN1 Notebook Consultant

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    What solder are you using? What iron are you using?

    I just recently tried to repair a g71g dc jack with a radio shack iron and it worked for the most part but I don't think it gets hot enough (I didn't achieve the smooth solder joints I'm used to). I"m going to invest in another hot air machine with soldering iron so i can work on these without an issue.

    I would suspect you aren't getting the joint hot enough or using bad solder.

    If you solder in the new jack you can use a little plastic epoxy and buy the suggested right angle adapter to help take the stress off the dc jack.
     
  5. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

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    The problem is how big the lugs are and how large the traces are going to the power plug, it all acts as a heatsink.
     
  6. C4RN1

    C4RN1 Notebook Consultant

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    Yeah, a better soldering iron would fix that issue. In this tutorial I tell you I crank my soldering iron to max temp to solder dc jacks and other ports. Mainly because everything steals heat from the iron especially if you're soldering the ground.

    SRA solder is running another good deal for the 968, I think i'm going to pick up another one just for soldering my random projects. Out of 8 soldering irons I've had in the past this one is my absolute favorite. They do also sell the standard 70w soldering iron that will max at 480C, i'll link both for you guys so you can check them out.

    Aoyue 469 70 Watt Soldering Station > Soldering Stations > Main Section > SRA Soldering Products
    Aoyue 968A+ 4 in 1 Digital Hot Air Rework Station > SMD Rework Stations > Main Section > SRA Soldering Products

    The 968 is a little overkill but I love it, the hot air will help you remove stubborn ports. I sold my first one when I sold my store so I've been looking for a reason to get another one.

    I would suggest to pick up the 70w iron that's a little over $30 shipped in the US so you know you have a quality iron that can handle these motherboards. Of course technique and skill are always a factor, the most important thing to remember is not to use force. These circuit boards are delicate, treat them as such.
     
  7. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

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    Yeah I have just cheated for my larger ones and applied some pre melted solder with a low temp to get it going.
     
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