Asus G703GX or Lenovo y740?

Discussion in 'What Notebook Should I Buy?' started by GooPuddles, Nov 22, 2019.

  1. GooPuddles

    GooPuddles Newbie

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    I'm trying to decide between two heavily discounted gaming laptop options. I'd be hoping for something that is as "future compatible" as possible. I play a variety of games (currently Total War: Warhammer 2). I'll only be moving the laptop around the house, so mobility and battery life isn't a huge factor at all.

    Lenovo y740:

    https://www.lenovo.com/us/en/laptop...n-y-series/Lenovo-Legion-Y740-17/p/81UJ0001US

    -OR-

    Asus ROG G703GX

    https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B07N6PG...olid=2SXYJXG322NRK&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

    Summary:

    17" Lenovo y740 $1799 ( Intel Core i7-9750H | RTX 2080 Max-Q | 1TB SSD)

    -vs-

    17" Asus ROG G703GX $2389 (Intel Core i9-8950HK | RTX 2080 | 512 SSD)

    I'm new to all this and don't really understand the technical specs differences pros and cons. Can't tell which CPU is better. One has a full RTX GPU, the other has a larger hard drive. My budget is flexible, but looking for the best deal I can on a quality laptop that will last. Any help is much appreciated!

    1) What is your budget? Flexible. Around $2,000 to $2,500USD

    2) What size notebook would you prefer? 17"
    3) Which country will you buying this notebook? US

    4) Are there any brands that you prefer or any you really don't like? N/A
    5) Would you consider laptops that are refurbished/redistributed? Sure.

    6) What are the primary tasks will you be performing with this notebook? Gaming.

    7) Will you be taking the notebook with you to different places, leaving it on your desk or both? Just around the house.

    8) Will you be playing games on your notebook? Warhammer 2, Witcher 3, mmo's, a variety

    9) How many hours of battery life do you need? Not really important.

    10) Would you prefer to see the notebooks you're considering before purchasing it or buying a notebook on-line without seeing it is OK? Doesn't matter.

    11) What OS do you prefer? Windows, Mac OS, Linux, Chrome OS, etc. Windows.


    Build Quality and Design

    14) Are the notebook's looks and stylishness important to you? No

    Notebook Components

    15) How much hard drive space do you need? Flexible here.

    Timing, Warranty and Longevity


    16) When are you buying this laptop? ASAP.

    17) How long do you expect to use this laptop? As long as possible.

    18) How long could you afford to do without your laptop if it were to fail? I have a desktop.

    19) Would you be willing to pay significantly extra for on-site warranty, or would it be acceptable to you to have to ship the laptop to the vendor for repair with perhaps a week or more outage? No
     
  2. TheReciever

    TheReciever D! For Dragon!

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    On paper the Asus is a significantly better machine with overclocking potential.

    I personally like the Lenovo for the design and i/o placement however the fact is you can typically add more storage when budget allows at a later date. The same can't be said for the core components (cpu/gpu).
     
  3. SMGJohn

    SMGJohn Notebook Evangelist

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    This might just sound mean and nonsensical but bear with me, think about what you just said, I know, why would you buy a gaming laptop when the only place you will use it is in your house? For the same amount of money you are willing to spend on these, you can get a pretty serious gaming desktop with a pretty good display.
    I used to think gaming laptops were great back in 2012, but when I only ever moved it was because I cleaned the dust under it, it goes to show that the amount of money I literally threw in the burner, I could have had some serious desktop hardware, the best of the best in that era for sure.

    Of course I understand if space is a serious issue to consider, or if you do not have your own personal space around the house etc, but I just want to be the voice of reason to tell you to think about it for a night, will you REALLY be using that portability?
    After all, a gaming laptop only makes sense if you are moving from point A to B, A LOT. Or you live in a Japanese apartment.

    Apart from that I recommend the Asus just because its got a Non Max-Q GPU and a better CPU, either way they are both going to throttle like mad and temps are going to be really up there in the 90s even on the GPU's, and there not much you can do about it, I recommend you repaste either of them if you do get one with Kryonaut thermal paste.

    If you really need a laptop, I really, really really like to suggest Clevo instead, you get way more bang for your bucks and way more upgradability.
    Eurocom serves the US market if I remember. There bunch of Clevo resellers if you need help I can stand in but its up to you, with Clevo they are much thicker machines and very heavy usually 4 to 5 kg if fully packed but you get them in 15 inch and 17 inch and they wont throttle they even come with full desktop CPU and unlocked GPU.
     
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  4. GooPuddles

    GooPuddles Newbie

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    Wow, that's a lot to chew on. Thank you for that info. My full situation is this:

    I have an upstairs office where I work from home. In this office, I have a desktop computer that's about 7 years old with a GTX 640 (ancient) GPU and other components they don't even make anymore. I was looking for a gaming laptop so I can take my work laptop up and downstairs with it (my remote job allows me to work from home and naturally, I game on company time). So, instead of being confined to my office all day upstairs, I’d like to be able to move about.

    Regarding the Clevo idea... I’ve never even thought about that brand. I have a lot to think about and I think I’ll show down and take your advice and do some more research into my options. Heck, I just found this forum today!
     
  5. SMGJohn

    SMGJohn Notebook Evangelist

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    I understand your situation but I would still recommend a gaming desktop, prebuilt desktops these days are by no means what they used to be 10 years ago and are very well priced and made.
    I still recommend a desktop, gaming laptops are very expensive, and if something goes wrong with it, be prepared for trouble as Team Rocket would say.
    You will find yourself having that gaming laptop sit in one position for years, trust me, I live in a place with barely any room and even then a gaming laptop was just wasted money, desktops can be built quite small and I managed to cram high end hardware into a case that is essentially just 30% bigger than the PlayStation 4 Pro.

    So even then, necessarily desktops do not have to be big not even prebuilt, and keep in mind that gaming laptops specially with the kind of hardware you are looking at are LOUD, and very HOT.
    The keyboard on them is laughably mediocre which in my opinion is make it or break it feature on a laptop after all what do you do most on a laptop? You type stuff despite what people think that is the most common thing you do on any PC.
    Also a gaming laptop is heavy, you looking at best 4kg to 6kg with the specs you gave me, that is within reasonable weight, I want you to find something as comparable to that weight and try carry that around with you the house, do that couple of times a week and you will find yourself putting that laptop in a permanent place.

    Take my advice and think real hard about this, its a lot of money, a lot of trouble if it goes wrong and frankly gaming laptops are not as upgradable as they used to be even just 4 years ago.
    But desktops are, buy a good CPU, all you need is to upgrade GPU every 5 years or so, you rather spend 2500 dollars every 5 years? Or spend 500 dollars for a GPU? Its self explanatory.
     
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  6. GooPuddles

    GooPuddles Newbie

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    I've decided to take your advice. I'm currently looking into building a PC - perhaps a small form factor. Instead of spending $3k on a gaming laptop trying to chase desktop performance, I'm going to spend much less on a laptop, and the bulk will go towards building a PC. It was eye-opening when I started looking at the cost of components to build a PC... I could build a pc with a 2080ti (probably overkill) with an i9-9900k (also overkill) for less than a ROG G703GX. It's nuts! Even if I can afford blowing that money on a gaming laptop, it just doesn't make financial sense. Thank you again for being a voice of reason!
     
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  7. SMGJohn

    SMGJohn Notebook Evangelist

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    I am very glad I could help.
    I crammed some seriously hot components into small PC myself but that is the beauty of desktop its easier to modify the chassis.
    http://forum.notebookreview.com/threads/underestimation-of-tiny-fans-in-itx-pc-builds.829511/

    Cerberus is another company that make tiny cases for mATX which is quite amazing how much space is utilised in this.

    There lots of alternatives out there, many whom support liquid cooling if that something you want to dabble in.

    Sent fra min SM-G970F via Tapatalk
     
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