Apple Refuses to fix a T2 failure - no evidence of water damage...

Discussion in 'Apple and Mac OS X' started by hmscott, Aug 3, 2019.

  1. Rodster

    Rodster Merica

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    Yup, that was my point exactly !
     
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  2. Rodster

    Rodster Merica

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    Yup, and it's the same wrt to phones, tablets and the look of the OS. When OS X became real popular on the Mac, Microsoft changed the flat look of Windows XP to the 3D look of OS X with Windows Vista. And when Apple changed the look of OS X from 3D to flat, Microsoft copied that too with Windows 8. Linux is no different, many of the distros copied the 3D look of OS X and now they're using the flat look of macOS.
     
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  3. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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  4. Rodster

    Rodster Merica

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    Stuff like that happens all the time but you would expect that from some 3rd party repair company who’s doing/attempting the repair on the cheap. I could even envision someone like Best Buy doing that.

    But I would have to hold the mfg to a much higher standard since they purposely decided to build the device making it difficult to repair in the first place. And having worked myself as a field technician for two large computer manufacturers in the 80’s they should provide manuals and training so this type of stuff doesn’t happen and if it does they should fess up to it. Trying to charge the customer for something they broke is not cool especially when they were tricked into overspending on the computer in the first place.
     
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  5. ssj92

    ssj92 Neutron Star

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    My end goal will be to get macOS Catalia working in the ultimate hackintosh hybrid.

    Alienware Area-51m with i9-9900K, 32GB RAM, RTX 2080 (unsupported) hooked up to my Radeon VII through the alienware graphics amplifier (fully supported with hdmi audio as well) for rendering in FCPX & Logic Pro X. Ethernet using usb type-c adapter.

    Current macbook pro 2013 is having a hard time with 4k video but the new macbooks aren't worth it.

    [​IMG]
     
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  6. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    It is actually amazing that Apple hasn't made their T1/T2 chips a requirement for "activating" MacOS after installation.
     
  7. ssj92

    ssj92 Neutron Star

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    They can't....yet.

    They support macs such as my 2013 macbook pro so they cannot enforce this. They would have to drop support for quite a few models in order to restrict to newer models. Probably at least 1-2 years more before that happens.
     
  8. win32asmguy

    win32asmguy Moderator Moderator

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    It's a shame that Nvidia cards are not supported anymore. I had my WT75 basically fully supported with MacOS High Sierra with a i9-9900k and MXM GTX 1070. The Area 51m would be even better, if Dell had made a DGFF Vega64, or even used a mux on the eDP like they do on the Precision line.

    I have a Predator Helios 500 AMD - and with a "Vanilla AMD" install its probably 95% functional as a Mojave hackintosh, other than the stupid PS/2 not being detected periodically. Sadly Steam initially didn't work due to lack of 32-bit support but it looks like now there is a 64-bit client so I will try it whenever I get the Predator back from Acer.

    I am also going to try a Clevo N970TF build with an i9-9900. It has the internal display and a single mini-displayport connected to the iGPU. Perfect for use under Linux and MacOS while connecting to an external display.
     
  9. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Apple has already had a number of "cut-off" points where new MacOS versions won't be supported on older hardware. It happens often enough, that I'm surprised it hasn't happened already. At the point where MacOS requires T2 only hardware support - where every Apple computer sku before T2 is cut-off from MacOS support.

    macOS Catalina compatibility
    https://www.techradar.com/news/macos-catalina
    "Of course, one of the first questions that come to mind must be: can the Mac or MacBook I own right now work with this new hotness?

    Luckily, every piece of Mac hardware that could upgrade to the current macOS 10.14 Mojave will be able to receive the new macOS 10.15 Catalina update. Here's the full list of devices:
    • 12-inch MacBook (2015 and later)
    • MacBook Air (2012 and later)
    • MacBook Pro (2012 and later)
    • Mac mini (2012 and later)
    • iMac (2012 and later)
    • iMac Pro (2017)
    • Mac Pro (2013 and later)
     
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  10. Rodster

    Rodster Merica

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    I was actually surprised well, okay shocked, that Apple decided to include my 2012 Mac Mini in the list for MacOS 10.15 as I thought Mojave was the end of the line and I was OK if that was going to happen. Mojave ran OK with the original hard drive and 8GB of RAM although startup was rather slow as expected. You'd figure that Apple would want to cutoff the 2012 Mini's because of the 2018 models.

    From what i've read, Catalina is pretty much the same as Mojave so that could be why it's still supported. I plan on adding an SSD if performance is a dog.

    I can see them requiring a T2 chip in the future but they really need to sort out the T2 crashes on their own hardware. I can also see the T2 chip having issues with external boot drives (i.e. disabling boot feature) in the future as well because now Apple is pretty much into soldering their SSD's to get their customers to fork over more money at the time of purchase.

    I was looking at some of the 2018 Mac Mini configurations on Best Buys website and 64GB with a 2TB SSD (soldered) is just north of $4000. Yikes, ouch, oh ye suckers
     
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