Apple dropped the macbook? old news?

Discussion in 'Apple and Mac OS X' started by Lefix, Aug 12, 2011.

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  1. kornchild2002

    kornchild2002 Notebook Deity

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    Spinning off does not mean they are getting out of the business. IBM is still in the business yet on an enterprise and government level (the servers in the building where I work are all IBM Linux machines actually made by IBM) while business and home consumer needs are taken care of by Lenovo. HP is simply spinning off its PC business which means it can sell the whole outfit to another company (which I doubt since that would be a lot of money that I don't think anyone can afford) or HP's PC end is going to become its separate entity just as Motorola did with its phone division (which was later snatched up by Google). What all this has to do with the topic at hand is beyond me.

    The funny thing is that the Macintosh was geared as being the first consumer friendly, price conscious PC back in the day. In fact, that is one of the reasons why it beat out the Lisa. So Apple has not always been about making luxury PCs as there was a time, even before Steve's departure, when Apple focused on making computers that home consumers could afford. Even the Apple IIe was affordable compared to other products from IBM.

    Actually, Apple currently sell five different iPhones through two different carriers in the U.S.: the 8GB iPhone 3GS, 16GB iPhone 4 GSM, 32GB iPhone 4 GSM, 16GB iPhone 4 CDMA, and 32GB iPhone 4 CDMA. While that still isn't as many smartphones as Motorola has on the market, it is still more than "just one." I think you are also forgetting that the iPhone is competitively priced. The $199 price tag goes right up against other smartphones from other companies with similar form factors and features. It is starting to look expensive now mainly because others have stepped up into dual-core territory with higher resolution displays but you get the idea.

    Which is the main issue Apple has going against it. Someone with a budget of $1000 has three choices: save up for a MBP, settle on the 11" Air, or go with someone else. Hence why an inexpensive white MacBook replacement, priced at ~$700, would be a good choice. It would show that Apple is back in the game of competing with other manufacturers (just as they did in the early and late 90's when Steve was heading them) instead of stubbornly staying at and above the $1000 price as they have done for the last ~11 years.
     
  2. Lieto

    Lieto Notebook Deity

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    You forgot to mention that there are also black and white iphones which are also completely different devices just like motorolla ones.

    Thats like saying that bread baked in small bakeries (and thus more expensive) is luxury bread compared to bread baked on large mainstream bakerys ownd by government. Apple is more expensive but its not luxury -- they dont coat their laptops with swarowsky and gold. They just invest into their own specifically tailored OS, high quality materials and marketing. In other words you get a product with quality features that got a use for you, its not LUXURY, its not some shiny whistles made of gold.

    (i dont deny that marketing share may be rather big in some case, it doesnt make it a luxury product though, they never showed a king of the world in their advertisement, they show normal business or creative people, like myself :p)
     
  3. linuxwanabe

    linuxwanabe Notebook Evangelist

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    IBM had left the consumer market long before Lenovo came along, and the ThinkPad line wasn't a profitable venture for IBM - just a line of loss making hardware that allowed IBM to sell genuinely profitable services to large enterprises. It took a decade for IBM to execute its turnaround.

    A week ago, that might have been true, but the Touchpad firesale has been a disastrous move for HP. Investors have no confidence in the latest announcements and consumers are just waiting for the next firesale.

    Considering current economic conditions and the decline of the entire PC industry, the future of HP's PC business is not assured. It might make more sense for HP to shut it down and take a $10-12 billion writedown against earnings. A lot depends on tax law.
     
  4. linuxwanabe

    linuxwanabe Notebook Evangelist

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    And we're back to this again. The white polycarbonate Macbook died because consumers stopped buying it and shifted to the Macbook Air and Pro lines. It didn't help that it looked out of place in an Apple Store in 2011.

    The announcement of HP's intention to spin-off its PC division only underline the fact that Apple has been successful because of, not despite, its non-competitive pricing strategy. Apple doesn't compete on price. HP did - and see what happend to HP?

    The amazing thing is that people buy white plastic Macbooks for $700 every day. Yes, people do pay that much for USED Macbooks, which in turn allows current owners to upgrade their Macs on a yearly basis. So used Macbook users benefit from the stable, high prices of current models. Resales values matter when it comes to Apple sales, especially in terms of repeat sales to loyal customers.
     
  5. kornchild2002

    kornchild2002 Notebook Deity

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    Yes I did. So that is 8 different iPhone 4 models across two carriers along with the 8GB iPhone 3GS.

    They are luxury computers when put up against the majority of the competition especially since Apple is taking hardware that often found in much less expensive computers, putting it in a fancy aluminum casing, and slapping on a much higher price tag. I could have purchased a Windows notebook for about $600 featuring the same hardware that is in my 13" MBP but instead, I decided to pay the extra $700. So I am not really complaining about the high price as I was willing to do it especially when I actually compared my 13" MBP to those other plastic notebooks. You can call it whatever you want but the difference is there. It is like buying a Lexus IS 250 over a Toyota Corolla. They are both essentially the same thing but one comes in better packaging and has that high price logo on it.

    I am not denying that the white MacBook needed to go. In fact, I was happy to see it go especially since it had specs worse than a notebook from 2008 while carrying a high price. I am making an argument that Apple should replace it with something better looking, better hardware (a Core i3), and attach a lower price.

    And? They might be spinning off their PC division but they are still selling more computers than Apple, Dell, Acer, and Toshiba. The whole news of the spinoff does not mean that they still aren't successful at what they are doing. The only difference between them and Apple is that HP's sales figures tend to fluctuate a lot based on the different times of the years and what promotions were held (either by HP or other stores) during each fiscal quarter. The same holds true for Dell, Acer, and Toshiba. Apple's are pretty constant because their computers really don't go "on sale." So, instead of Apple sitting at the number 4-5 spot for years to come, they could release a lower priced high quality MacBook and move up a few ticks by actually being competitive. I am not saying that they should revamp their entire notebook segment but rather come out with one model that is competitively priced to increase their instal base.

    That way Apple's computer division can be more successful instead of them heavily relying on their iOS universe for their cash-flow.
     
  6. linuxwanabe

    linuxwanabe Notebook Evangelist

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    Well, Apple made the decision not to have a direct replacement.

    I don't think we know how much of discount Apple is getting from Intel, but for all we know, Apple might be paying Intel less for a i5 than smaller companies are paying for i3s. Heck, every processor comes off the same line anyway.

    The bottom line is that I'm not altogether thrilled with the price/value equation of a Macbook Pro or Air, but I have to admit that Apple has a winning strategy.



    The difference between Apple and HP is that Apple has long term planning that actually works.

    HP's sales aren't just cyclical, but highly price sensitive. HP was just aggressively selling Windows boxes, fulfilling and feeding a market for commoditized consumer PCs. In the end, it didn't really matter just how many commoditized consumer units HP actually sold. Why? HP was selling a generic, Windows PC product on the basis of price. Now, the market is shifting and HP is left with a low margin business in a dying sector.

    In contrast, Apple is fairly well positioned both for the downturn in the broader economy and the decline of the Windows PC.
     
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