***Aorus X7 Pro owner's lounge***

Discussion in 'Gigabyte and Aorus' started by cookiesowns, Dec 15, 2014.

  1. Joel2312

    Joel2312 Newbie

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    Guys I'm have issue with my aorus x7 pro v5. The plastic frame of my screen start peeling off and the hinge cant close due to uneven force distribution, can I fix it by myself? The glue of this laptop seems to be weak
     
  2. OSUbuckeye2007

    OSUbuckeye2007 Notebook Enthusiast

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    Today i discovered a 'worn out' usb port.
    Never encountered this in my life, didn't know USB ports could be worn out.
    I used this one the most, swapped cables probably 1-2x per day. There is no real visual problem but since no cables are recognized at all, upon plugging in, I can only assume it is worn out.

    I've had it for 1yr 3mo, purchased through Amazon from ExcaliburPC. Anyone have experience with this type of issue? Is it worth the warranty claim? The port is the USB on the left, when looking at the keyboard on the v6.
    Just wondering if I should fix or warranty.

    I have experience tearing and building PCs. I've replaced the power socket off the motherboard on a past laptop (Asus G73), and have all the soldering equipment needed, since I build micro drones. But I've never opened my Aorus and since it is under warranty, wanted an experienced opinion.
     
  3. Svegetto

    Svegetto Notebook Evangelist

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    All ports have a certain durability. Per the spec (http://www.usb.org/developers/docs/devclass_docs/CabConn20.pdf) USB Type has the smallest of 1500 insertion cycles (usb mini/b has 5000 and micro has 10000). Given 2x a day, you should only be at <900 cycles, so it is a premature failure. Whether it's worth the warranty claim it depends on you..... ~2 weeks without the machine for one of your usb ports.
     
  4. Damin

    Damin Notebook Guru

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    Hello everyone

    I have a Aorus X7 pro GTX970M 3GB version SLI

    I can't seem to get it to run very cool CPU is very high around 96° maximum and GPU around 88° maximum and the slave is around 80° Maximum when gaming .

    I have 're pasted both the CPU and GPUs and but have not changed the thermal pads yet.

    And I can not update the BIOS due to the laptop not having a battery in it ( I just use the power adapter )
     
  5. GTVEVO

    GTVEVO Notebook Deity

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    Star1child, if I understand the issue you are facing correctly. The CPU overclock silder works by applying Intel "XTU" profiles. You can change these manually and allow your slider to hit any clock speed you desire. Just locate the profiles being used usually under the (SmartManager/cpuoc/<model>) directory, back them up and then overwrite them with new profiles you export out from XTU that include core offset voltage and your determined clock speed.
     
  6. Star1child

    Star1child Notebook Guru

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    This was my first model Aorus gaming laptop and it is a decent rig, especially for its time back then as there was nothing like it being so slim with its power to slim size ratio.

    I know the following might sound a bit pointless and you may have done a few steps, but I would suggest all of the following might help at best, or maybe just waffle in which case feel free to ignore:-

    1. cleaning/hoovering the laptops vents (intakes & exhausts) inside and out which means opening up the laptop again. While it's open, clean the fans free from all dust and more importantly if the tiny heat-pipe-radiator-fins are not clear and free from dust & fluff, then find a way of clearing them so that airflow can travel freely and fast again.

    2. Get a decent laptop Cooler stand with fans and make sure airflow direction of Cooler stand matches the laptop. I had this setup and it did help a little not so much the fans in the stand, but more so because the stand allows airflow more freely because it props up laptop away from a solid table base.

    3. Try and ensure there's plenty of space around the laptop's sides and more so the rear ( 1 foot space if possible).

    4. Make sure a decent high power fan profile is selected within Command & Control.

    5. Try and avoid any overclocking as any performance gain is tiny or insignificant vs the extra heat generated.

    6. Many of today's infinitely more demanding AAA game titles are really making CPU's sweat with their higher performance demands. As much as we crave for high quality graphic visuals, unless you have a liquid cooked high end Desktop then you'll have to bite-the-bullet and lower those graphic quality settings. Adjust so that your fans are not screaming at their maximum after a while of gaming, which sadly means resisting the "Ultra or Very High" settings for latest high performance games, or experimenting and tweaking to get your personal preference. I have found that the default "Optimal" setting within NVIDIA GeForce Experience software is often not ideal, but if you click the Spanner icon you can then adjust a slider below optimal to find the best setting. Avoid dynamic super resolution scaling which puts way to much unnecessary demand on CPU & GPU. Shadow quality & anti alaising methods can contribute heavily to demand, so find the best processing methods used by these.

    7. I have always found that the damn HDD's within gaming laptops are heat bombs. After extended gameplay, the heat a HDD contributes& adds to the laptop internally and its chassis is excessive. On my now current Aorus X9 Laptop, the area around the internal HDD (front right) gets very hot and toasty even though the X9 has extra air intakes and venting ports. Old technology mechanical spinning hard drives should ideally not be used anymore in laptops, however SSD's are still costly for higher capacities which force manufacturers. I would say if you could store your most performance intensive most played games on the internal PCIe M.2 SSD's within your X7 then your helping to remove excessive usage and therefore unnecessary excessive heat generated from your internal HDD which slightly reduces effectiveness of your internal cooling system. Even better if your in a position to swap out the HDD for a 2.5" SATA SSD. I'm certainly planning myself on maybe replacing my HDD in my X9 because the heat from it is frankly rediculous, even offensive.

    8. I noted that you re-pasted the CPU/GPU. Although I've never done this personally, if I were to consider doing this I would probably opt for Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut as it appears to yield results.

    Some hard core PC Pro's go further and de-lid the CPU to re-paste it between die & lid which is massively risky, voids warranty and risks damage especially if using metallic paste - this is only for people that know what their doing and have money to throw on replacement CPU's & parts if all goes wrong.. Recently some have applied a new type of "straight-on-die" CPU cooling water blocks for desktop gaming rigs which is insane!

    Gaming laptops sadly don't run and probably will never run as cool as desktops with their bigger fans, radiators, liquid cooking options and so on. I've always seen CPU temps run high on laptops wether gaming type or not. Old games admittedlyrun superbly on gaming laptops and my No1. favourite of all time Battlefield 3 runs fantastically without the fans spinning fast on my Aorus X9. However if I run Ghost Recon Wildlands, Ghost Recon The Division, AC Syndicate and other demanding AAA games then the fans work extra hard after several minutes of gameplay. I've had temperature peaks of 97 degrees on CPU with demanding current games, but considerably lower in older games like BF3 where it hits around the eighties. (so again lower those graphic quality settings in demanding titles, especially the culprit settings).

    Lastly you stated that you have no battery in your X7 unit and although you can get by without one, having one will not only allow BIOS update, but one of the best things I think in having a battery is that in effect it becomes an UPS (un-interruptible power supply) which can be invaluable for preventing data loss and safer chipset firmware updates.

    Sorry if a bit long winded.
     
  7. Damin

    Damin Notebook Guru

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    @Star1child Thanks a million for all this help and the 1 trick i will still try is the harddrive trick..

    What i have found is that the heat-pipe setup in this laptop can get ever so slightly bent out of shape maybe over time..

    The design is good but NOT GREAT...

    This is where the heat issue comes from GPU1 and CPU heatsink not making great contact with GPU2's heatsink ( a solid 1 piece design would have been much better )

    I will be doing all this over through tomorrow and might take a few pics to upload encase others have the same issue as me some time.
     
  8. Star1child

    Star1child Notebook Guru

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    I'll have to re-read that one as it's been a while since I've had the X7 now and I'm currently on my second Aorus X9 unit, so I've lost touch and cannot remember to well regarding what you mentioned about Intel's XTU. I'll look it up later but what I do remember is that the actual reached Overclock was always showing below what was being set within Command & Control's Overclock slider settings. When checking within CPUz/HWMonitor, it showed the correct multiplier for the Overclock being set, i.e. setting OC to 4GHz within OC section of Command & Control resulted in a 40x multiplier, however Aorus's OC Guage and some other monitoring utilities would show clock fluctuating at around 0.3 to 0.4GHz lower than what was set. I think this was because Aorus's OC Guage within Command & Controll was displaying the "Uncore" clock speed and not an average sum of the 4 separate cores. Unless mistaken I think uncore clock runs sightly below core clocks speeds. Still I would have preferred a sum average representation of the 4 cores which would have resulted in the OC Guage giving a closer reading to what speed has been set on the Overclock slider setting.
     
  9. GTVEVO

    GTVEVO Notebook Deity

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    Sorry man I didn't realize it was a post date of April 2017 after the thread was brought back. FYI though the same holds true for the x9. Aorus updates these profiles and their clock vs target displayed can be misleading. They should provide general names on the sliders like they do for the gpu side. Regardless the user has control which is nice.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
     
  10. Star1child

    Star1child Notebook Guru

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    I agree with you on the heat pipes not being ideal, they have always looked like an after-thought to me. They defiantly look undersized and prone to mid-shaping overtime. When I saw some of the more impressive, solid, cutting edge vapour chamber offerings that can be seen in Sager's NP9877 GTX1080 SLI laptop and even the rather impressive looking heat exchange system with bleeding edge vapour chambers in the latest overly slim Razer Blade Prob; I felt a little disheartened that Aorus didn't concentrate more on this. No surprise incidently with the Sager NP9877 better heat exchange system as it's a laptop rocking an unlocked overclockable desktop i7 -8700K CPU, as well as being brick-like. Still Aorus (Gigabyte) can do better.

    I have to commend Aorus on their extra venting & exhaust placements in the Aorus X9 Laptop which are impressive, however when I'm running current AAA game titles I'm not really seeing thermal benefits when I'm seeing CPU occasionally hitting 97 degrees. Let's be honest thought, Ghost Recon Wildlands is the new Crysis 3 for benchmarking or seeing just how good your new PC is.

    Eventually I'm gonna give up and think I'll consider getting an open loop watercooled desktop PC when the gaming version of NVIDIA Volta comes out, either being called GTX 1180? GTX 2080? NVIDIA Ampere? or NVIDIA Turing? (Are the current rumours).

    Trouble is, I'm a sucker for convenience & ability to unplug my gaming rig and transport it from room to room or one house/place to another and even take it on holiday.
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2018
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