Anyone use Seafoam?

Discussion in 'Motorized Vehicles' started by jooooeee, Jun 12, 2010.

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  1. jooooeee

    jooooeee Stealth in disguise

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    I'm thinking about picking some up for my truck and trying it out. I've been reading about it and I have seen everything from a miracle cure to engine destroyer so I'm a little hesitant about the stuff.

    Does anyone have some experience or good information?
     
  2. millermagic

    millermagic Rockin the pinktop

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    I had an explosion in my intake manifold with the stuff ... I'm lucky it didn't blow the intake manifold apart.
     
  3. JDELUNA

    JDELUNA Notebook Deity

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    I have used it in 2 of my cars. I took off one of my intake manifold vacuum hoses and used that to suck the Sea Foam, while I manually opened the throttle body so that the car would not die. Once it sucked the whole can, I turned off the car and I let it sit for about an hour and then started the car and drove it. It will smoke like crazy and idle funny for about the first 5 miles and then it will clear up. That is my experience. I hope that helps. God Bless :)
     
  4. aan310

    aan310 Notebook Virtuoso

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    it's pretty good. I've had it work wonders inside oil on a car with a messed up oil pump (passat), but as putting it in the vaccume line, it cleans up alot, and fixed a rough idle. As a gas additive i couldn't tell you.

    Just remember don't use too much.
     
  5. millermagic

    millermagic Rockin the pinktop

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    It depends on how you use it. If you suck too much in at once you can hydrolock the engine or start messing stuff inside. A lot of people like it, I did too the first time I tried it. The second time ... didn't end well.

    The most important thing is to CHANGE YOUR OIL very quickly. It really only follows the path of the air going through the intake manifold so that's really the only place it can do any food.

    I wasn't really worried about damaging anything in my engine becuase it's a cast iron engine that's been through a lot in the 9 years I had it.
     
  6. Tippey764

    Tippey764 Notebook Deity

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    I've used somthing simlar to it at school. We used a very small hose to suck it up, so you cant suck up too much at once. Not being able to drive the car after we did it ( because it was at school ) i really couldn't tell a difference.

    I do plan on doing it to a 1991 integra with 287k that i recently picked up though.
     
  7. Trottel

    Trottel Notebook Virtuoso

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    I love seafoam. I've used it a bunch of times on various cars. I change the oil from 1 to several days after adding any to the oil. Depending on how much carbon buildup you have in your cylinders, you can get almost nothing to a a never-ending cloud coming out of your tailpipe. It isn't something you have to use very often and at most I've done it twice on a single car.

    Hydrolocking your engine with seafoam is a myth. It is simply not possible. When you calculate how much incompressible fluid the engine can pass through, you can see that you would have to suck up the whole bottle in less than one second.

    Also there is no danger if the engine dies while sucking in seafoam. You just start it back up and keep going. There is really no way for it to mess anything up. It is just a powerful solvent. The worst it can do is that if your engine is only holding fine because it is dirty and grimy, then cleaning that out with seafoam may lead to leaks in seals (any of them) that were not there before. I've only heard this is possible and have never actually had any problems with it.
     
  8. millermagic

    millermagic Rockin the pinktop

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    I thought the instructions were to stall the engine with seafoam and let it sit for 5 minutes?

    The stuff "exploding" in my intake manifold could have been a freak thing ... every week or so my car will backfire out the intake on a warm start. It blows the PCV valve off the intake and then the car won't run haha
     
  9. Trottel

    Trottel Notebook Virtuoso

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    Haha, maybe. I haven't done it since last July.

    There might be some relation there. That sounds really unusual.
     
  10. bubzers

    bubzers Notebook Evangelist

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    @ jooooeee

    i've used it in my camaro. it's not a big deal. i sent you a pm about it.
     
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