Anyone tried Linux on an MSI laptop?

Discussion in 'Linux Compatibility and Software' started by Ultra Male, Dec 7, 2017.

  1. alexhawker

    alexhawker Spent Gladiator

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    In this usage/context, it means to put down/disrespect.
     
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  2. jclausius

    jclausius Notebook Virtuoso

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    Yep! I added the Ubuntu link as it gives a description on how firmware 'initializes' the hardware and the driver does the rest, and also in Windows how those two components (firmware / driver) are merged into one piece - the Windows driver.

    However, you gave a nice description. I didn't want to seem like I was disrespecting your response.

     
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  3. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Prophet

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    I understand your point. I don't have any problem if you correct me. ;)
     
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  4. Dennismungai

    Dennismungai Notebook Evangelist

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    Most wireless (and audio devices) require binary blobs, known as firmware, to run low level H/W initialization as the device driver loads.

    The fastest way to do this would be as shown below:

    1. Cloning the linux-firmware tree.

    2. Building and installing its' artifacts.

    Steps:

    For firmware, run this to build and install the latest blobs from upstream:

    mkdir -p ~/linux
    cd ~/linux
    git clone https://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/firmware/linux-firmware.git/
    cd linux-firmware
    sudo make install -j$(nproc)
     
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  5. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Prophet

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  6. Dennismungai

    Dennismungai Notebook Evangelist

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    mdadm will work just fine even with raw devices.

    It does not mandate FakeRAID support, but rather provides support for the IMSM format by Intel (on supported systems).

    I'm not able to get IMSM RAID to assemble on post-Skylake systems to date.
     
  7. Dennismungai

    Dennismungai Notebook Evangelist

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    At the moment, this doesn't seem like a high priority at Intel.

    What makes it worse are OEMs like Lenovo, among others, switching to RAID mode only without a fallback to AHCI mode, essentially locking out *nix.

    Matthew Garrett's article explains this better.
     
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  8. Txordi

    Txordi Notebook Consultant

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    It's a very big shame how free OS users are treated even today, when Linux is waaay more big and mature than it was 10+ years ago. They just ignore us on a daily basis when it comes to hardware support. Even enormous and crucial companies as Intel... Not promising at all.

    Enviat des del meu SM-J510FN usant Tapatalk
     
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  9. Dennismungai

    Dennismungai Notebook Evangelist

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    Software is one thing. Hardware is another.

    And when it comes to vendors, obscurity serves them better (financially).

    The future of the Linux desktop is still eons away, at this rate.
     
  10. cat1092

    cat1092 Newbie

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    On my FX603, have ran Ubuntu, Linux Mint 12 through 17.3 & currently Linspire (subscription based Xfce distro). Linspire was a time limited holiday gift from PC/OpenSystems.:)

    http://www.pc-opensystems.com/2018/01/freespire-30-and-linspire-70-released.html

    Runs great also, as did Linux Mint & to a lesser degree, Ubuntu, which I didn't care much for. Also ran Ubuntu MATE when first released on the FX603.

    However, the FX603 is a legacy BIOS notebook, UEFI models of various brands may not run Linux. At first, my Samsung didn't, now runs Mint fine. I'd say look on the OEM's support forum & browse through the Topics, and see if anyone is running Mint of the MSI model one desires. Research is the key to finding what does & doesn't work, because if one has this question, it's been asked & answered thousands of times already.

    One thing to make sure of after install and updating. Check the Hardware Drivers tab, this is where one activates Intel CPU microcode & if installed, drivers for NVIDIA discrete cards. A reboot will be required between each. One cool thing about Linux that Windows doesn't have, is the option to truly enable the NVIDIA GPU globally, and holds between reboots. If the need to save power arises, like going out or running in battery mode, then can switch to the onboard (Intel HD) graphics. I wished it was that simple for Windows & why they've yet to add the feature.

    Those with older AMD GPU''s will have to rely on open source drivers, unless running a distro such as Linux Mint 17.3 or Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (supported through April 2019).

    Good Luck with Linux Mint of the MSI notebook!:)

    Cat
     
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