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Any reliable Free Anti-Virus/Internet Security?

Discussion in 'Security and Anti-Virus Software' started by FrankieBX, Jul 6, 2010.

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  1. FrankieBX

    FrankieBX Notebook Consultant

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    I am awaiting my new laptop, and was wondering if there are ant reliable free Anti-Virus software out there? I am sick of spending $60 every year, such a rip off. After spending $2000 on a new laptop, I'm trying to cut costs wherever I can. Any input is appreciated, thanks.
     
  2. MidnightSun

    MidnightSun Emodicon Super Moderator

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    Microsoft Security Essentials is a good choice, in my mind it's pretty much on par with Norton Antivirus 2010, which I would venture to say is the best paid AV.

    Another good choice to check out is Avira, although personally I prefer MSE over it.
     
  3. -L1GHTGAM3R-

    -L1GHTGAM3R- Notebook Deity

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  4. Deks

    Deks Notebook Virtuoso

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    Out of the free ones, you have the following 3 antivirus programs that are the best (rated by highest detection rates):


    1. MSE (Microsoft Security Essentials)
    2. & 3. Avast5 and Avira10 (equal in detection rates).

    All 3 programs in question are small (they do not slow the system down), highly effective in detection rates and removal of threats (on par with most 'quality paid solutions').

    I use MSE for over 6 months now, and I find it VERY effective.
    Haven't had problems of any kind (and most of the people, after I replaced their paid solutions with these free ones, have been very grateful since now they don't have to pay for anything and their computers are actually protected in a competent capacity).

    Bottom lines is: you don't have to pay for protection programs anymore because the free alternatives are more than enough.

    P.S. Stay away from AVG for the moment (it has a low detection rate and slows the system down in both free and paid forms)
     
  5. FrankieBX

    FrankieBX Notebook Consultant

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    Thanks for the insight. I'm going to go with Microsoft Essentials when my laptop first arrives. I'm pleased that I don't have to throw out $60 a year !:D Thanks again!
     
  6. luee

    luee Notebook Deity

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    I have MSE, Avast, and Private firewall installed and use Malwarebytes as a scanner; after much research and trial and error.
     
  7. coolguy

    coolguy Notebook Prophet

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    Using two security programs simultaneously doesn't make any sense, unless you have turned off real-time protection in one of the programs.
     
  8. Padmé

    Padmé NBR Super Pink Princess

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  9. woofer00

    woofer00 Wanderer

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    Could check out Comodo Internet Suite. The AV is not the best, but Firewall + HIPS + Defense+ means it's unlikely anything will ever even hit the AV. It can be a real pain to configure properly though.
     
  10. Baserk

    Baserk Notebook user

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    ^Agreed, a HIPS like in Comodo or Online Armor is a very strong security layer if not one of the best.

    The main issue with setting up a HIPS is that you have to be sure that the computer is clean when installing it.
    That way you can configure the HIPS without much hassle.
    Otherwise it can become an annoying and tedious 'rite de passage' with near endless popups if you have to accord every single piece of software yourself.

    Another strong layer of security software is using a sandbox like SandboxIE.
    You can safely (for instance) put your browser in the sandbox or download and install a program in the sandbox and try it out.
    When you close/empty the sandbox, changes made during the browser session or by installing the downloaded program will be erased.

    Another simple and strong measure is using a LUA/Limited User Account to do your common stuff (as in, not installing programs), not an administrator account with UAC.
    That way, malware (at least the major bulk) can only affect your computer at user level, not admin level.
    And the most simple and strong layer is using common sense of course.
     
  11. woofer00

    woofer00 Wanderer

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    Agreed. HIPS is a pain when you're installing new software. When I've used CIS, it's been on an absolutely clean and stable machine with everything I need already updated and installed. I'll disconnect it from all networking, set it up in learning mode, startup every program I could possibly ever use, then lock it back down. Otherwise, every minor I/O request will throw up a flag and drive you insane. Once that's all set up, go online and deal with the handful of networking requests you get (usually just IM, browser, maybe games and software that auto-updates). Otherwise, HIPS can be a painful mess to configure one executable process at a time.

    Best thing? I can let anyone use my computer without fear. Visit a malware site and try to run a bad executable? Auto-sandboxed with a giant red warning box that pops up to scare the crap out of the noob.

    BTW, the latest CIS does incorporate a sandbox. Not sure how it rates compared to others, as I've seen every sandbox broken with the right malware.
     
  12. holymoly

    holymoly Notebook Geek

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    does Microsoft Security Essentials or any of the free suites have something similar to program control?? I've only been using ZoneAlarm security suite for ages on my old laptop... and loves that feature, tells me when something is trying to access net and do stuff to my system, so i can OK or reject it... i find it very useful... but zonealarm is ultra slow in terms of virus scans and i almost never ran it...
     
  13. Deks

    Deks Notebook Virtuoso

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    If you use Vista or Win 7, you can configure the in-built firewall to block specific outgoing connections.

    Zone Alarm has been nothing but trouble recently which caused a plethora of problems on other people's computers.
     
  14. woofer00

    woofer00 Wanderer

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    check out comodo internet suite - the fw includes hips to alert network access, defense+ includes a sandbox and alerts to system changes. the av is soso
     
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