Any real ADVANTAGES to using a Mac over Windows?

Discussion in 'Apple and Mac OS X' started by SoundsGood, May 17, 2012.

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  1. SoundsGood

    SoundsGood Notebook Virtuoso

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    I'm gonna go to a "Getting started with a Mac" workshop at the Apple store, just for kicks. It should help to either increase or decrease my curiosity. :)
     
  2. kornchild2002

    kornchild2002 Notebook Deity

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    You probably won't like it. From my experience, the only way to get learn OS X is to actually play with it. There are plenty of videos on Apple's website detailing the basic ins and outs of OS X. That will essentially be what you will get from one of those workshops as they tend to focus on the basics. You might get a few additional questions answered but it isn't anything that can't be found with a 3 second Google search.

    Like I said, the best thing to do is actually play around with OS X. When I initially saw the tutorial videos, I thought OS X did some things backwards compared to Windows. I had used Windows exclusively all my life until I purchased my MBP last year (and MBA earlier this year). I still initially thought some things didn't add up until I just started using OS X.

    I would say the same thing to a lifetime Mac user wanting to move to Windows though. You just have to play around with the OS. In the end, both platforms are different means to do the same thing: get work done. This work can be media consumption, word processing, surfing the internet, etc. One won't drastically do something over the other one in terms of completing work. They might take different routes to get to the end point or run different programs but they will still take you to that destination.
     
  3. SoundsGood

    SoundsGood Notebook Virtuoso

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    Well, I went to the workshop today. I actually DID like the workshop and I'm glad I went, but I didn't learn much at all (it was very basic).

    Truth is I'm concerned that if I bought a Mac I'd be very frustrated since so many things are done differently than what I'm used to... yet for some reason I'm still intrigued and curious. Crazy, right? Why am I still curious???

    I might have to break down and buy one one of these days just to get it out of my system. I don't know...
     
  4. Rodster

    Rodster Merica

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    I was the same way with Linux. The internet is a great tool when you have questions. A simple search to a question and there is a good chance it's been asked before.

    If you are planing to use OSX then the frustration should be minimal. I jumped right in when Apple went from Classic to OSX. It was a dual boot iMac at the time. Honestly it was fairly easy to figure things out. I did like the single menu bar which changes depending whether you are in a program or on the desktop.

    Caution if you are buying just for curiosity sake then learn Hackintosh. There's ways to load OSX on a PC, you can learn from there and if you find that OSX is the cats meow then by all means buy a Mac.

    I recently purchased an iPad because I too was curious and it's the market leader. I actually love Android but wanted an iPad and now the iPad rarely gets used but my Android tablet still gets used everyday.
     
  5. SoundsGood

    SoundsGood Notebook Virtuoso

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    Thanks Rodster. Guess I've got some thinkin' to do...
     
  6. redrazor11

    redrazor11 Formerly waterwizard11

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    Consider iOS platform development. Much much easier in the native OSX environment (ex. developing apps for the app store for iPad, iPhone, etc.).

    You might not be a developer, but it is still a valid point to add to the differences.
     
  7. dmk2

    dmk2 Notebook Evangelist

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    While I agree that OS X window management is somewhat lacking out of the box, there are a number of 3rd party utilities and add-ons which will bring it up to the level Windows and Linux users expect.

    Cinch is a clone of Win 7 Aero snap.

    SizeUp is similar to Cinch but keyboard driven. It can be used together with Cinch.

    Witch turns Command-Tab into a full-featured window switcher rather than a brain dead app switcher.

    Divvy is a grid based window sizer that provides the same functionality as Cinch and SizeUp but it's a lot more flexible. It basically treats the root window as a grid and allows you to specify window size & placement in terms of grid cells and create your own keyboard shortcuts for different layouts.

    Arrange is similar to Divvy but with a different interface.

    Windownaut and Moom make the green maximize button on the title bar into something actually useful. Windownaut pops up a selection of window placement presets, while Moom pops up a grid.

    HyperDock gives you window previews when mousing over application icons in the dock - just like Win 7 Aero peek. It also includes some Aero snap features.

    For me, Snow Leopard + Divvy + Hyperspaces was window management bliss and better than Win 7 and any X11 window manager I've ever used. I should note that I've been using virtual desktops since fvwm in the early 90s, so when Apple merged Expose + Spaces + full screen apps into the mess known as Mission Control I was not happy and I still think Lion is a step backwards. FWIW, I wasn't happy when Microsoft dropped the virtual desktops PowerToy either.

    Also note there are 3rd party Dock replacements (e.g. Drag Thing), Spotlight replacements (Lauchbar, Alfred, Quicksilver), and Finder replacements (e.g. Path Finder). And then there's Raskin, which seems like an insane idea for a desktop OS, but to each his own I guess.
     
  8. SoundsGood

    SoundsGood Notebook Virtuoso

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    Okay, I gotta ask: if these things are used to make a Mac function more like Windows, wouldn't we be better off just going with Windows? (or am I maybe missing something?)
     
  9. Rodster

    Rodster Merica

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    The answer is yes. I'm always a firm believer in leaving an OS stock so you can learn it faster. Having an OS mimic another OS just prolongs the learning curve and if anything it will confuse you more and you'll probably be back to Windows much sooner than you thought.
     
  10. dmk2

    dmk2 Notebook Evangelist

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    Cinch and HyperDock are the only two things I mentioned that mimic Windows.

    Witch is a variation on the basic Command/Alt - Tab switching that is a feature of Windows and Mac, but Witch is better than either one.

    Divvy is actually available for both Mac and Windows, it provides features that neither OS provides out of the box.

    Windownaut and Moom are unique (feature-wise) to OS X.

    EDIT: Also, the main reason why I prefer Snow Leopard + Divvy + Hyperspaces for window management over anything in Windows is that OS X Spaces (augmented by Hyperspaces) provides proper built-in virtual desktops while the Windows Desktops utility is an inadequate hack. Spaces has been kludged a bit in Lion but it's still a major feature advantage vs. Windows. So while I agree with previous posters who said window management in Windows 7 is better than Lion, that's only true when comparing them out of the box. They both can be tweaked and improved easily enough that it's a toss-up.
     
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