AMD's Ryzen CPUs (Ryzen/TR/Epyc) & Vega/Polaris/Navi GPUs

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Rage Set, Dec 14, 2016.

  1. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    If you recall there were mentions of new ThreadRipper x499 Q1-19:

    AMD X499 Chipset
    • Release Date: Q1 2019
    • Supports Threadripper
    • Unknown changes
    • Sources
    https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/TechPowerUp/Future_Hardware_Releases/

    It might be the motherboard and accessories vendors looking for relief as well. The resources to come up with the new Ryzen 2 series of motherboards + compatibility BIOSes, and accessories at the same time as ThreadRipper 3 motherboards, might have been too much to ask.

    Some delay with TR3 would give the motherboard vendors and TR3 specific accessories vendors more breathing room between Zen 2 and TR3 release schedules.

    Along with the 7nm crunch, spreading out these releases a bit more should allow for more time on each new product release - hopefully fewer problems and dropped details.

    Computex 2019, 28 May to 01 June, 2019 would be a good time for AMD to give ThreadRipper 3 updates some love. :)

    Gigabyte preparing X499 motherboards for 3rd Gen Ryzen Threadrippers
    The names of three new Gigabyte motherboards have been revealed bearing the “X499” designation. It’s believed at least one of the boards will be capable of offering 10 GbE network data rates. AMD is expected to introduce the X499 chipset specifically for the 3rd Gen HEDT Ryzen Threadripper processors.
    by Daniel R Deakin, 2019/04/02
    https://www.notebookcheck.net/Gigab...for-3rd-Gen-Ryzen-Threadrippers.415593.0.html
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2019
  2. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    AMD chipset driver 19.10.0429
    From pipin on11.05.2019 at 09:42
    https://www.planet3dnow.de/cms/46450-amd-chipsatz-treiber-19-10-0429/


    With the release 19.10.0429 AMD has released a new chipset driver for the 64-bit editions of Windows 7 and Windows 10 for download.

    Chipsets supported are the X470, X370, B450, B350 , A320 and X399 (Windows 10 only), as well as 1st and 2nd generation Ryzen processors, A-series processors and 7th generation Athlon processors, Ryzen Threadripper 1st and 2nd generation (Windows 10 only) and Ryzen desktop and mobile processors with built-in Radeon Vega graphics (Windows 10 only).

    A changelog is not available. As in the release of Asus Version 18.50.06 is the AMD GPIO driver version 2.2.0.115 (12.11.2018) instead of 2.2.0.113 (24.09.2018) and the AMD PCI Device Driver version 1.0.0.0059 (11.10.2018) instead of 1.0. 0.57 (25.09.2018) included.

    The package that includes the chipset driver and the Ryzen Balanced Power Plan includes the following driver versions:
    • AMD GPIO Driver (for Promontory) Driver 2.0.1.0000 (25/09/2018)
    • AMD GPIO driver version 2.2.0.115 (24.09.2018)
    • AMD PCI Device Driver 1.0.0.59 (25.09.2018)
    • AMD SMBus driver 5.12.0.38 (25.09.2018)
    • AMD PSP 3.0 Device 4.9.0.0 (25.09.2018)
    • AMD USB3 .1 eXtensible Host Controller 1.05.3 (22.01.2018)
    • https://www.planet3dnow.de/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=433248
    download:
    Links to the topic:
    Source(s):
    https://www.planet3dnow.de/cms/46450-amd-chipsatz-treiber-19-10-0429/
    https://twitter.com/planet3dnow/status/1127116727513432064
    https://twitter.com/momomo_us

    IDK if this update is enough, but worth a try and to watch for matching software updates. :)
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2019
  3. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    MSI MEG X399 Creation Motherboard Review + Linux Test
    Level1Techs
    Published on May 13, 2019
     
  4. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Radeon VII Undervolt/Overclock & Improved cooling guide.
    Submitted 16 hours ago by mx5klein
    https://www.reddit.com/r/Amd/commen...ltoverclock_improved_cooling/?sort=confidence
    "Coming from a Vega 64 blower card to a Radeon VII I thought the tweaking process would be similar, but it isn't as simple as the original vega cards were. With a Vega 64, the card came power and thermally limited with almost no overclocking headroom which made undervolting the best option for 99% of people who just wanted to game without serious software modifications and cooling solutions. With the Radeon VII there are a few perfectly viable options and ways you can go to improve the card depending on what you want and how comfortable you are with modifications. I've detailed these options below.

    Tips and Warnings:
    • Be sure to save profiles with proper file names while tweaking your card. This will help you continue where you left off after a crash. Anything not saved as a profile will be dumped in the event of a crash and you will have to start from scratch.
    • Be careful and take your time when modifying your cooler if you go that route. It is not anyone's fault but yours if you break your card modifying it.
    • Lets face it, you bought a $700 enthusiast grade video card and want to mess around with it. You can afford $30 for the paid version of 3d mark to make this process easier. Heaven does not push the card hard enough.
    • These cards are binned from the factory and the stock voltage of the card can give you a sign about how good your silicon is. My stock voltage was 1130mv, I've seen cards with only 1019mv as a stock voltage which is lower than my max undervolt. This thread is a great resource to see what you could expect for the potential of your card, average overclocks/undervolts, temperatures with various mods, fan speeds, etc.
    Automatic undervolt with no other tweaking - Easiest and most simple way to reduce temps without losing any performance.
    • This option is the most simple without having to spend too much time or effort for easy efficiency gains and hopefully avoiding tjunction overheating with just a click of a button in wattman. All you have to do with this is go into AMD Radeon settings -> Gaming -> Global Settings -> Global Wattman and click the automatic undervolt button. This will automatically undervolt your card and hopefully reduce fan speeds and temperatures. I've found this to get to the same values I had with a manual undervolt but limited my ability to change the other settings.
    Manual undervolt/memory overclock - More complicated but you have more control over your card compared to the automatic undervolt.

    This option yields about the same result as the automatic undervolt but with more freedoms such as: Changing the fan curve, overclocking memory, and lowering clock speeds below stock to reduce temperature and voltages.

    Using 3d mark you are going to want to setup a custom run looping one graphics test in windowed mode. Once you have that going you are going to want to get into Wattman and while running the graphics test and slowly lower the voltage on the frequency/voltage graph.

    If you notice any artifacts like flashing lights that aren't supposed to be there or flashes of black screens, you've gone too far - add voltage or decrease clock speeds.

    Memory overclocking is not as important as it is with almost any other card but it is still worthwhile imo. Just slowly add frequency until you have problems then back it off 50mhz or so and leave it there.

    Manual undervolt/memory overclock with cooler mods - Drastically reduce your temperatures and/or fan speeds compared to the other options.

    If tjunction temperatures or fan speed/noise are still undesirable after an undervolt. Modifications to the cooler may be necessary.

    The most effective cooler mod would be the Mod done By u/CarbonFireOC - Radeon VII, how to drop 40C on your stock cooler temps.

    There is another mod called the washer mod but I do not personally recommend it for long term use as the extra mounting pressure on the package is concerning for the longevity of the card IMO.

    After lapping the cooler as per the above post, the washer mod made no difference in temps for me anyways. After you have the cooler mod done, expect lower temperatures and/or lower fan speeds compared to the manual undervolt without the cooler mod.

    Manual core/memory overclock with cooler mods - With cooler mods and an overclock expect roughly stock fan speeds/temps but with much more performance.

    Using the same cooler mod as shown above, you now have thermal headroom so you can push the card further than stock with acceptable noise levels and temperatures.

    This is a lot more exciting than overclocking Vega 10 because a daily overclock is actually viable on this card with reasonable power draw.

    Same drill with running 3d mark as the undervolt but instead you are going to set the power limit to +20% and slowly start increasing the frequency and voltages while 3d mark is running.

    Again, you are going to want to look out for any artifacts like flashing lights as when these show up the card is about to crash and is unstable. Be sure that your temps and fan speeds are manageable to you and stop adding voltage when you feel like it's not worth the temps and noise.

    Personally I found this point to be around 1150mv for me. After you have found a stable core overclock bring your memory up, Just slowly add frequency until you have problems then back it off 50mhz or so and leave it there.

    Final Notes:
    After you've found settings you are happy with the settings you found and are stable in 3d mark be sure to test the card out in a few games and other applications until you are sure it is 100% stable. 3D Mark will get you close, but games can push cards differently than just a stress test and cause instability.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2019
  5. Zymphad

    Zymphad Zymphad

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    LOL, just saw the X570 boards are going to have fans for the chipset because in certain situations the chipset overheats and draws too much power. Haven't read what new feature is causing X570 to require active cooling.
     
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  6. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    POWER!! :)

    Edit: Saw the board, seems the PCH has the low profile fan on the heatsink, and it's supposed to be for certain "new feature" situations where it will help with cooling. IDK, I've had PCH fans before, and occasionally it actually helps - if I take it off there are problems - this was on x58 in particular. Same goes for laptops - adding active cooling to PCH. Not sure if this is BIOSTAR only, time will tell. Looks like a huge heatsink, not just PCH, unless that new PCH is huge. Maybe it's for cooling something else underneath it, almost looks large enough to contain storage or other large feature.

    Same for the up-TDP 2nd rev x299 Intel boards. The more the power stages, the better the cooling required, and no matter what expanse of heat sinks were added all of the reviewers pointed fans at them when OC'ing, so I guess they decided what the heck, lets just put fans on'em from the factory.

    The higher core count CPU's are "rumored" to exceed previous generation socket AM4 power limits as well, so I would imagine right at the edge the previous generation AM4 motherboards might peter out as far as power delivery.

    The new motherboard chipset will need to allow for even further Zen 3 power increases as well, so I would imagine that those specifications need to be met as well - unless top CPU upgrades each generation will require new motherboards.

    Lots of fun stuff. :)
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2019
  7. Zymphad

    Zymphad Zymphad

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    Hmm, well for 3700x read the TDP will be 105, similar to 2700x. So I expect my board will be able to provide ample power for 3700x. Believe my VRM can provide about 400 watts. I don't think 3700x will even use 50% of what my board will be capable of.

    Both Gigabyte and Asus use the same 10+2 phase. Gigbyte with the 40A limit well math says 480 Amps... And Taichi well uses 12+2 phase w/ 60 A. Taichi is the most overkill.

    At least that's my hope. I may have to wait and see what the reviewers say of the 3700x power draw.

    I suspect the X570 needing fan is for those who may be using 5ghz DDR4.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2019
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  8. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Well, there are rumored to be a couple of higher core sku's, and AMD has put out 125w CPU / motherboard chipsets in the distant past, and may do so again if things work out as projected.

    Who needs 16c/32t anyway? ;)

    No matter how hard AMD bends over backwards to bring in to compatibility previous generation socket motherboards, there are always generational interface and feature growth by the last iteration of a socket. The same will likely happen with the AM4.

    Budget permitting, if the features are of interest - worth the cost - maybe consider building a new AM4 PC and selling / adopting out the current PC? That's how I do it. Keep the hardware running - no need to have an old motherboard sitting in a cabinet / drawer, keep it running so someone else can enjoy it. :)
     
  9. Zymphad

    Zymphad Zymphad

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    I'm just really glad AMD is going to continue using the AM4 for the Ryzen Zen2 and be compatible with boards like X370, and X470. Good on AMD for that!

    I believe the following X470 boards, Gigabyte Gaming 7, ASRock Taichi, Asus Crosshair VII all three will be overkill twice over for the 3700x and 3800x. I don't know about the MSI X470 Carbon AC, it's supposed to be a really beefy 5 phase VRM.

    I reviewed Buildzoid's assessment of the 10+2 phase. He says with 2700x @ 4.3 ghz @ 1.42v, it's about 125A. Well this one has 480A available. I expect the 12 and 16 core Zen2 will still be within the peak efficiency of these boards.

    With my current system with the NVME and 3886 DDR4, I don't think I'll be upgrading for a few years. The only thing I plan to upgrade maybe in two years time is the 2070 to whatever it will be. I don't think the bottleneck issues will change for the next half decade, at 1440p and higher res, the GPU will continue to be the bottleneck, not the CPU or ram.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2019
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  10. Atom Ant

    Atom Ant Hello, here I go again

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    Hello

    I will have a Dell with Ryzen 5 2500U APU, I wonder if there will be undervolting option with some 3rd party program?
     
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