AMD's Ryzen CPUs (Ryzen/TR/Epyc) & Vega/Polaris GPUs

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Rage Set, Dec 14, 2016.

  1. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    AMD Slashes Prices of First-Gen Ryzen Threadripper CPUs: Starting at $300
    by Anton Shilov on August 27, 2018 10:00 AM EST
    https://www.anandtech.com/show/13273/amd-slashes-prices-of-first-gen-ryzen-threadripper-cpus

    "...As a result of the price cut, the eight-core Ryzen Threadripper 1900X will cost around $300, the twelve-core Ryzen Threadripper 1920X will be priced at circa $400, whereas the former flagship Ryzen Threadripper 1950X will be available for $799.

    A quick check with Amazon indicates that retail prices of the said CPUs are very close to their SRPs, or even below them.

    For example, the octa-core 1900X is now available for $308, whereas the 16-core 1950X can be purchased for $720.

    The 1900X has more memory channels and PCIe lanes than any regular Ryzen processor, so the chip makes sense for those who need a lot of DRAM bandwidth and/or plans to use multiple high-end SSDs and/or graphics cards..."

    "...It is unknown how many Ryzen Threadripper 1000-series CPUs are still in stocks of retailers and AMD as well as how long these stocks will last.

    AMD’s Ryzen Threadripper 2950X is set to be released on August 31, whereas the model 2920X is due in October..."
     
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  2. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    AMD loses another key executive, Jim Anderson, as it shifts manufacturing to TSMC
    Anderson's departure is a blow to a company that has already lost two key executives, just as it appears that AMD has regained its footing.
    By Mark Hachman, Senior Editor, PCWorld | AUG 27, 2018 1:34 PM PT
    https://www.pcworld.com/article/330...erson-as-it-shifts-manufacturing-to-tsmc.html
    amd_jim_anderson_pcworld_full_nerd-100769864-large.jpg
    "As AMD moves into the next phases of its Threadripper and Vega chip architectures, it has made two key business changes as well: Jim Anderson, who oversaw AMD’s Computing and Graphics Group, has left the company. In addition, AMD has shifted its leading-edge manufacturing to TSMC, and away from GlobalFoundries.

    Anderson, who appeared on PCWorld’s The Full Nerd podcast just two weeks ago to explain the ins and outs of AMD’s new 2nd Gen Threadripper chip, has left to become chief executive of Lattice Semiconductor, an FPGA maker. Anderson will be paid several million dollars in stock and incentives, according to a Lattice statement. An AMD spokesman said that it was always Anderson's career ambition to eventually become a chief executive..."

    Lattice Semiconductor Appoints Jim Anderson as CEO
    Published: Aug 27, 2018 4:00 p.m. ET
    Industry Veteran with Proven Track Record to Focus on Accelerating the Growth of Lattice’s FPGAs and Smart Connectivity Solutions
    https://www.marketwatch.com/press-r...uctor-appoints-jim-anderson-as-ceo-2018-08-27

    "Lattice Semiconductor Corporation LSCC, -0.79% a leading provider of customizable smart connectivity solutions, announced the appointment of Jim Anderson as the Company’s President and Chief Executive Officer, and to the Company’s Board of Directors, effective September 4, 2018.

    Mr. Anderson brings broad technology industry experience and a proven track record of leading and transforming businesses to drive sustained growth and profitability.

    Mr. Anderson joins Lattice from Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) where he served as the General Manager and Senior Vice President of the Computing and Graphics Business Group..."
     
  3. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    We haven't heard from this guy in a while, remember his early "unbelievable" OC'ing Ryzen 2700X to 4.3ghz+? It turned out he was for real, and now he is moving to Phase Change cooling and reaching for 5ghz. :)

    See how noisy Phase Change is when running...

    Extreme Overclocking: 2700X and the race for 5GHz (-93°C) in Cinebench R15
    Hardware Numb3rs
    Published on Aug 28, 2018
    Are curious about how far a Ryzen 2700X can go ? This is the first of a series of video about Extreme Overclocking, using a Cascade Phase Change Cooling I can go down to -96°C and push the frequency where water cooling can't!
    I tried to break my personal record in Cinebench R15 and to run the benchmarks at 5GHz or above.

    The component used:

    AMD Ryzen 2700X
    ASUS Crosshair VI Hero X370
    Gskill Flare X 3200MHz C14
    ASUS Strix Vega 64
    Corsair RM1000i
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2018
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  4. Deks

    Deks Notebook Prophet

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    I genuinely don't think Intel will be able to that.
    The 14nm process (Even the high performing one Intel uses) has its limits. Intel is more likely to release overclocked versions of their CPU's, but they will probably also run much hotter and consume more power than AMD's Zen 2 on same clocks and 7nm (that's assuming Intel manages to squeeze out same clock speeds like AMD will).
    AMD is expecting over 5GhZ frequencies... with unknown IPC gains.
    40% performance increase from the process improvement over Zen 1 would easily put Zen 2 to 5.5-5.7GhZ on base for most lower core CPU's and progressively less as the core count goes up (8 cores would likely reach 5-5.2 GhZ on base, with 16 c parts probably on the 4.8-5GhZ base).
    That's of course if the 40% perf. jump is from frequencies only and IPC separate - but still, 5GhZ or over that on base is equally good across the board.
     
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  5. TANWare

    TANWare Just This Side of Senile, I think. Super Moderator

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    knowing math as well as I do the numbers can mean many different things. It could just be a 40% improvement per watt where as in the end the chip can only handle in all 75% of the wattage the 12nm's could. Without real silicon we have to wait and see. As far as Intel, who would have thought they would have gotten where they are with 14nm to begin with?

    I still can not trust AMD without actual silicon since the initial Vega claims and subsequent let down.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2018
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  6. Deks

    Deks Notebook Prophet

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    In regards to AMD overhyping...

    They were fairly consistent with ryzen and delivery as promised.
    Besides the 7mm process is designed for high performance and efficiency, whereas 14 and 12nm from glofo was designed for low clocks and mobile parts (so tjia isn't a direct comparison and they were rather specific in saying 40% performance increase on 7nm - we just don't know if its from frequencies alone or a combination or frequencies and IPC).

    As for the gpus... Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think vega was ever touted by amd that it would go up against 1080ti for example.
    Also, AMD overpowered it with really high amount of stream processors (much higher than what NV put on Pascal in terms of cuda cores). Then there is overvolting and the issue of using a manuf. Process suited for mobile parts and low frequencies.

    Mind you, vega did achieve much higher clocks than Fury, but it could have done that with lower amount of stream Processors (at which point it would likely consume less power and gaming performance would in all probability not suffer as compute doesn't translate readily to games).

    I do recall that AMD might have said vega would be a great overclocker... But evidently that never happened.

    In any case, they were inconsistent with the gpu claim(s?)…. Not cpu ones.

    But I agree that we should really wait for the actual silicon before we can specifically say what's what in regards to performance of zen2 parts.

    Still, right now, the info we have on 7nm TSMC points to high performance and efficiency.
     
  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Insane Deal: 12-core Threadripper For Only $420
    Hardware Unboxed
    Published on Aug 29, 2018
     
  8. Deks

    Deks Notebook Prophet

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    Your concern is warranted about 7nm capacity, because it seems that Apple gobbled up 75% -80% of the total capacity according to this:
    https://www.eetasia.com/news/article/18082404-tsmc-to-continue-as-apple-sole-supplier

    I'm not sure how much 7nm capacity is allocated to AMD.
     
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  9. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOK's Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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    I can see they talk about “putting all the eggs in one basket” also for Apple. It’s a risk but “they haven’t other choices” as stated in the article about AMD I posted above. Aka no backup plan if something unexpected happens. This maybe doesn’t look good for next gen AMD graphics. Their processors have most likely first priority.
     
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  10. Deks

    Deks Notebook Prophet

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    Well, GLOFO did end up suddenly discontinuing their 7nm production...
    Had AMD stayed with them and not made a deal with TSMC, they'd end up with huge issues right now (or at the very least, be forced to use 12nmLPP for Zen 2 and gPu's).

    I say that's not such a bad thing. Glofo was a problem for AMD for a while now because they were using unsuitable manuf. process for desktop hardware.
    At the very least, TSMC seems to be more reliable in this regard, and they have more experience.

    Granted, GLOFO was bound to use IBM's high performance 7nm process, but there were concerns about them being able to meed demands... its probable AMD got the wind of this early on and delegated to negotiate with TSMC.

    On another hand, this apparently indicates that Nvidia won't get 7nm access soon, which is probably why they are going with 12nm TSMC process.

    AMD seems confident enough capacity won't be an issue for TSMC as far as their products go.. in fact, they were able to push a demo of Vega on 7nm to late this year as opposed to next year... so at the very least, that gives us a possible positive outlook on things.

    I was already under the impression that Zen 2 was indeed AMD's priority... with GPU's coming in afterwards.

    I suspect that Zen 2 server parts along with Radeon Instinct will be coming in early 2019 (market availability that is)... with consumer Zen 2 following steady in the first quarter (or basically just a year after Ryzen+).
    As for GPU's... the consumer variety (Navi) is likely coming mid next year or might be released with consumer Zen 2.
    Don't know.

    But I'm thinking TSMC meeting AMD demand won't be too much of a problem.. even with APPLE gobbling up most of the capacity.

    You know... I can't help but think AMD could have also opted for 12nm TSMC much like NV did.
    It's still a high perf. process designed for high clocks and efficiency... so it would offer a substantial performance/efficiency increase over Glofo manuf. process, bringing them effectively on par with NV in GPU's... and possibly Intel in the CPU arena (maybe not 5GhZ + frequencies, but well above 4GhZ baseline most likely).
    Or delegate GPU's to 12nm, with Zen 2 on 7nm...

    Still, it also depends on how ready they are for rollout. There might not be too much of a difference if 7nm is ready as is (and AMD certainly claims it is), so, sticking to 12nm might be counterproductive.

    If problems arise with 7nm... we will have to wait and see what they are... though as of right now, AMD seems to be on track... and accelerating if anything (they are a much smaller company than APPLE, NV and Intel).
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2018
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