AMD's Ryzen CPU's (Ryzen/TR/Epyc) & Vega/Polaris GPU's

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Rage Set, Dec 14, 2016.

  1. jaybee83

    jaybee83 Biotech-Doc

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  2. Deks

    Deks Notebook Virtuoso

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    We might have a better idea of why Ryzen+ isn't getting lower voltages with higher frequencies, and why the TDP rose for 2700x:
    https://screenshotscdn.firefoxusercontent.com/images/077d91a3-d94e-4a68-815b-bf80c1c79c52.png

    This indicates that the 12nm LP used by AMD and GLOFO is in fact not based on IBM's high performance process, but is instead (again) focused for low performance and mobile parts.

    So, would someone care to explain this? :
    https://www.globalfoundries.com/new...-technology-for-high-performance-applications

    "2FDX provides an alternative path for the next generation of connected intelligent systems, enabling the performance of 10nm FinFET with better power consumption, lower cost, and better RF integration than current-generation foundry FinFET offerings."
     
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  3. TANWare

    TANWare Just This Side of Senile, I think. Moderator

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    TBH and fair, TDP is not the watts being consumed it more is the allowed power leakage (being shed) that is in the form of the heat generated before the chip is rated to collapse. We also then must have a cooling solution that can shed the heat generated and keep within thermal limits as well.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2018
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  4. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Whole quote:

    "GF's new 12nm FinFET technology complements its existing 12nm FD-SOI offering, 12FDX TM. While some applications require the unsurpassed performance of FinFET transistors, many connected devices need high levels of integration and more flexibility for performance and power consumption, at costs FinFET cannot achieve. 12FDX provides an alternative path for the next generation of connected intelligent systems, enabling the performance of 10nm FinFET with better power consumption, lower cost, and better RF integration than current-generation foundry FinFET offerings."
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2018
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  5. Deks

    Deks Notebook Virtuoso

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    All well and good, but given that 2700x has a TDP of 105W, and can only boost to 4.3GhZ on 1 core... doesn't that contradict that last sentence?
    If anything, we are seeing a minor improvement of the GF 14nm process but with same apparent restrictions in terms of the process being suited for lower clocks and mobile parts.
     
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  6. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Maybe you are reading too much into the TDP specification?

    We haven't seen the power draw, and won't until starting 4/19, so we should wait until then and see what the power draw is in comparison between the 1700x/1800x and the 2700x, etc.

    So let's see how the new Ryzen 2 uses it's performance / watt in actual use.

    The problem is with my translation, it looks like their quote compares their 12nm to competitors 10nm:

    "12FDX provides an alternative path for the next generation of connected intelligent systems, enabling the performance of 10nm FinFET with better power consumption, lower cost, and better RF integration than current-generation foundry FinFET offerings."

    So I will go back and fix my post :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2018
  7. Deks

    Deks Notebook Virtuoso

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    Yeah, I noticed that... though, you'd think 10nm FinFET would be inherently superior to 14nm LPP... and as such, you'd still be able to achieve same TDP with higher boosting frequencies.
    I realize TDP is not the same as power draw, but usually for AMD CPU's and GPU's power draw tends to end in the similar W ballpark as TDP, if not higher.

    But, you are also correct that we should wait to see the final product before making any final statements... it's just that to me, the technical specs (at the moment) seem to produce very different results in comparison to what was said of the product.

    Also, what is 2700x supposed to replace?
    1700x or 1800x?
    From what I could tell, its a successor to 1800x... but at higher TDP and not quite the 10% higher boost (unless the remainder of performance is in the architecture optimizations - which is definitely possible).
     
  8. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    The Ryzen 1.0 1700 / 1700x / 1800 / 1800x turned out to be over doing the spread at the top, since all of those models were essentially the same when OC'd to about the same end result, no matter which model you choose.

    The 2700x / 2700 cover all 4 previous models, 1700 / 1700x / 1800 / 1800x , at a much lower price for the highest performance model, a big price savings over the Ryzen 1.0 prices.

    There are no viable rumors that I've seen for 2800x / 2800, except "where are they"?

    AMD could probably get away with a single 2700x without a cooler, and offer the RGB coolers as accessory to the CPU. The same for the other sku's, have a single X model, and unbundle the cooler.

    There is probably some element of "shelf" space grabbing involved in AMD's sku spread decisions. :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2018
  9. TANWare

    TANWare Just This Side of Senile, I think. Moderator

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    I might be wrong but I think it is because of x370 chipsets. Since the older chipset does not use xfr2 most may want to then purchase the 2700. Now the 2700x may then be designated to x470 chipset boards for the added stock performance.
     
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  10. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Get Ready… They’re Nearly Here! | Ryzen Zen+ Preview
    Published on Apr 16, 2018
    Ryzen 7 2700X, Ryzen 7 2700, Ryzen 5 2600X & Ryzen 5 2600, The second generation of Ryzen CPUs are hitting shelves April 19th, a new 12nm process, 2nd generation tweaks, their Zen+ CPU’s look to be VERY impressive. Ryzen 7 2700X review and Ryzen 5 2600x review coming soon.
     
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