AMD's Ryzen CPU's (Ryzen/TR/Epyc) & Vega/Polaris GPU's

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Rage Set, Dec 14, 2016.

  1. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    HP ENVY x360 Convertible Laptop - 15z touch
    AMD Ryzen™ 5 2500U Quad-Core (2 GHz, up to 3.6 GHz, 6 MB cache) + AMD Radeon™ Vega Graphics
    Ships on: 11/27/2017
    $ 734.99 => Discounted to $ 599.99
    http://store.hp.com/us/en/pdp/hp-envy-x360-convertible-laptop-15z-touch-1za07av-1
    • Windows 10 Home 64
    • AMD Ryzen™ 5 2500U Quad-Core (2 GHz, up to 3.6 GHz, 6 MB cache) + AMD Radeon™ Vega Graphics
    • 8 GB DDR4-2400 SDRAM (2 x 4 GB)
    • 15.6" diagonal FHD UWVA micro-edge WLED-backlit multitouch-enabled edge-to-edge glass (1920 x 1080)
    • 1 TB 7200 rpm SATA
    • Office Software Trial
    • Security Software Trial
    • 3-cell, 55.8 Wh Lithium-ion prismatic Battery
    • No DVD or CD Drive
    • Full-size island-style backlit keyboard with numeric keypad
    • HP Wide Vision FHD IR Camera with Dual array digital microphone (Touchscreen)
    • Intel® 802.11ac (2x2) Wi-Fi® and Bluetooth® 4.2 Combo"
    Product specifications

    Operating system
    Windows 10 Home 64
    Windows 10 Pro 64

    Processor and graphics
    AMD Ryzen™ 5 2500U Quad-Core (2 GHz, up to 3.6 GHz, 6 MB cache) + AMD Radeon™ Vega Graphics

    Display
    15.6" diagonal FHD UWVA micro-edge WLED-backlit multitouch-enabled edge-to-edge glass (1920 x 1080)

    Memory
    8 GB DDR4-2400 SDRAM (2 x 4 GB)
    12 GB DDR4-2400 SDRAM (1 x 4 GB, 1 x 8 GB)
    16 GB DDR4-2400 SDRAM (2 x 8 GB)

    Hard drive
    1 TB 7200 rpm SATA
    256 GB PCIe® NVMe™ M.2 SSD
    1 TB 7200 rpm SATA; 128 GB M.2 SSD
    360 GB PCIe® NVMe™ M.2 SSD
    1 TB 7200 rpm SATA; 256 GB M.2 SSD
    512 GB PCIe® NVMe™ M.2 SSD
    1 TB PCIe® NVMe™ M.2 SSD

    Office software
    Office Software Trial
    $20 off Microsoft® Office 365 Personal 1-year
    $20 off Microsoft® Office 365 Home 1-year
    $20 off Microsoft® Office Home and Student 2016
    $50 off Microsoft® Office Home and Business 2016
    $70 off Microsoft® Office Professional 2016

    McAfee LiveSafe(TM) Security Software
    Security Software Trial
    $40 off McAfee LiveSafe 12 months
    $89.99 off McAfee LiveSafe 24 months
    $169.98 off McAfee LiveSafe™ 36 months

    Theft protection
    Computrace LoJack for Laptops, One Year
    Computrace LoJack for Laptops, Two Years
    Computrace LoJack for Laptops, Four Years

    Primary battery
    3-cell, 55.8 Wh Lithium-ion prismatic Battery

    Keyboard
    Full-size island-style backlit keyboard with numeric keypad

    Personalization
    HP Wide Vision FHD IR Camera with Dual array digital microphone (Touchscreen)

    Wireless technology
    Intel® 802.11ac (2x2) Wi-Fi® and Bluetooth® 4.2 Combo

    Battery life
    Up to 9 hours [3]

    Video Playback Battery Life
    Up to 7 hours and 15 minutes [3]

    Battery Recharge Time
    Supports battery fast charge: approximately 90% in 90 minutes [5]

    Audio
    Dual speakers

    Pointing device
    Touchpad with multi-touch gesture support

    Expansion slots
    1 multi-format SD media card reader

    External I/O Ports
    1 USB 3.1 Type-C™ Gen 1 (Data Transfer up to 5 Gb/s, DP1.2, HP Sleep and Charge); 2 USB 3.1 Gen 1 (1 HP Sleep and Charge); 1 HDMI v2.0a; 1 headphone/microphone combo

    Power supply
    65 W AC power adapter

    Energy efficiency
    ENERGY STAR® certified; EPEAT® Silver registered

    Dimensions (W X D X H)
    14.16 x 9.8 x 0.77 in

    Weight
    4.75 lb

    Warranty
    1 year limited hardware warranty (information at www.hp.com/support); 90 day phone support (from date of purchase); complimentary chat support within warranty period (at www.hp.com/go/contacthp)

    Software included
    McAfee LiveSafe™ 30-day trial offer (Internet access required. First 30 days included. Subscription required for live updates afterwards.)

    Ryzen Mobile's First Laptop Is Out!

    Published on Nov 13, 2017
    Ryzen Mobile's first laptop is officially on sale. It's the HP Envy X360 2-in-1.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2017
    Atma and saturnotaku like this.
  2. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Some interesting takes on Raja's move, Intel's MCM use of Vega / Polaris GPU's, etc. I'll add more here as I find them.

    HW News: Radeon Chief Leaves AMD for Intel, RAM Supply Surge

    The Raja Saga: From ATI, AMD, Apple and back again to the Stars (Vega & Navi) & Intel

    AMD Inside - The Beginning of the End for Nvidia in PC?
     
  3. James D

    James D Notebook Prophet

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    @hmscott Is discount over? I see 805$
     
  4. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    I see the same price. :(

     
  5. ajc9988

    ajc9988 Death by a thousand paper cuts

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    @hmscott - So, I thought about this for awhile and want to bounce this off of you.

    For Zen 2 (not the Ryzen refresh), the rumor has gone from a 48-core chip to a 64-core chip. If we assume that only 4 dies will be used on the PCB, this means that there is a potential increase in cores per CCX to 8-cores. This would mean that TR would have a bottom of 16 cores (could still be 8, but...) and top of 32, but this question of design applies to mainstream chips. The APUs and chips for mobile only have 4-cores and a single CCX. My thought is, for mainstream, they may have plans for a single CCX 8-core on Zen2, which would have increases due to no more inter-CCX latency on die. That, plus the increased cache sizes, could mean much improved performance on a second generation Zen processor, before examining other modifications to the chip. This is an updated thought from the 48-core rumor and speculation of 6-cores per CCX. I don't think I mentioned this from the other day when you posted about the 64-core successor to EPYC.

    Thoughts?
     
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  6. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Links? What Zen2 speculations with those specs are you referring to?
     
  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Last edited: Nov 14, 2017
  8. ajc9988

    ajc9988 Death by a thousand paper cuts

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  9. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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  10. ajc9988

    ajc9988 Death by a thousand paper cuts

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    It is directly getting at Zen 2. Here is the logic on this:

    EPYC is a zen zeppelin complex with b2 stepping whereas Ryzen and TR are a zen CCX dual complex with b1 stepping. Epyc will likely skip the ryzen refresh 12nm node. TR follows layout and design, to a degree, of EPYC. So, changing to accept 8 dies instead of 4 seems less likely, although not impossible. This would suggest in an increase of cores per CCX OR the number of CCXs per die, potentially. Hence the deductions of this discussing Zen 2 (with the starship rumor being from last year of 48 cores, which I can pull up if needed). Does that make more sense on why I believe it is discussing the 7nm design, which makes a lot more sense since that cuts the footprint of components by nearly half, which would allow the core numbers to scale up. So lots of assumptions embedded in my analysis, admittedly. This is why I wanted to bring it up for discussion.
     
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