AMD Fusion Info Thread

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Jayayess1190, Aug 1, 2010.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. davidricardo86

    davidricardo86 Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    2,376
    Messages:
    1,774
    Likes Received:
    107
    Trophy Points:
    81
    I will try it just to satisfy my curiosity (i know I can do without it and my A10-4600M would still have some value). That and I plan on keeping my 6475b through the end of the warranty period (3 yrs) so I may as well have the "best" until I get rid of it (assuming it will be as simple as plug and play). By then Kaveri will be long gone and we'll be talking about the next gen after that. I want to see how the A10-5750M behaves in different notebooks and with low-latency 1866 RAM. That's probably as good as it'll get for the 35W Piledriver/VLIW4 architecture at 32nm. It is sad we never saw a 45W version like Llano. Whatever, bring on HSA, 28nm GDDR5/DDR4 and GCN!
     
  2. Atom Ant

    Atom Ant Hello, here I go again

    Reputations:
    1,340
    Messages:
    1,497
    Likes Received:
    267
    Trophy Points:
    101
    Haven't I said somewhere Kaveri APU coming only in next year;

    Source
    Look like Kaveri APU will have to compete with Intel Broadwell APU...:rolleyes:



    I've found a good news too, AMD Carizo APU coming in 2015 (Hopefully);

    AMD Kaveri APU Successor Named, Carizo Coming In 2015
     
  3. Deks

    Deks Notebook Prophet

    Reputations:
    1,130
    Messages:
    4,742
    Likes Received:
    1,885
    Trophy Points:
    231
    With all due respect, but AMD delaying Kaveri is (for now) an assumption based on circumstantial evidence at best. AMD didn't say anything about delaying Kaveri as of yet... and, while yes, it is a possibility, we won't know until there's official word.
    On that point, even the article states that Kaveri 'might be delayed' (emphasis on 'might').

    According to their roadmap, Intel has no Broadwell products slated for 2014. They do however have a Haswell refresh.
    Consumer-grade Broadwell (on 14nm) is slated for 2015 if I'm not mistaken.
    So... unless Intel decides to push it all back, I doubt Broadwell will see the light of day next year. This is more in line with their 'refresh' schedule. They first release a changed CPU (say Haswell), followed by a refresh that sports slightly higher clocks or further modifications to squeeze out what they can (but couldn't, or rather didn't want to) before the initial release.

    Interesting indeed... but for now, all we know its an APU that comes after Kaveri. We don't know whether its a Kaveri refresh, or whether it will be based on the previously mentioned Excavator.
     
  4. Atom Ant

    Atom Ant Hello, here I go again

    Reputations:
    1,340
    Messages:
    1,497
    Likes Received:
    267
    Trophy Points:
    101
    Now we have seen desktop Kaveri tests, so I'm curious how satisfied you are guys? Excited and waiting for mobile Kaveri?

    I found here an interesting 3DMark11 test, which include an a 45W version Kaveri (A8-7600 with 384 GPU cores);

    [​IMG]

    What points do you guys are expecting from the 35W mobile A10 with 512 GPU Cores?
     
  5. Twodordan

    Twodordan Newbie

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    5
    Pardon me if this sounds silly, but wouldn't it be possible, in theory, to build a gaming laptop with the full 95W A10 7850? I mean, if you -only- include the APU (without a standalone 100w mobile videocard), you should have enough room for cooling and wattage to spare, no?

    I know nothing about laptop motherboards and if they could support this, but it sure would be awesome.
     
  6. davidricardo86

    davidricardo86 Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    2,376
    Messages:
    1,774
    Likes Received:
    107
    Trophy Points:
    81
    The A8-7600 has a user configurable TDP. As shown by the graph it can be set to its highest 65W to its lowest 45W. However the 3dmark 11 score only changed by 100 points.

    Here's some testing done by the guys over at semiaccurate:

    http://semiaccurate.com/2014/01/14/difference-50-watts-make-amds-kaveri/

    Kaveri excels in performance per watt as compared to Richland. I also wonder if something like this could be used in "gaming laptops."

    Sent from my XT1049 using Tapatalk
     
  7. Apollo13

    Apollo13 100% 16:10 Screens

    Reputations:
    1,432
    Messages:
    2,582
    Likes Received:
    210
    Trophy Points:
    81
    That would be interesting, using the desktop A10-7850K in a gaming laptop. There have indeed been gaming laptops with desktop processors before, even with 130W parts, usually with powerful GPUs, and sometimes with SLI or CrossFire. You'd need a good cooling system even for a 95W CPU, but it should certainly be possible, and considerably more reasonable than the gas guzzlers of yore.

    I'm certainly looking forward to seeing some mobile Kaveri numbers. On the desktop, there's still no reason to replace the i5 2500K that I already have. But on the mobile front, it may well be the sweet spot for replacing my 6.5-year-old laptop. I don't need a CPU as powerful as what Intel offers on mobile anymore since I can use my desktop for that, but adequate gaming performance for LANs with recent games would be nice, and Kaveri fits in well with that. I was rather disappointed that CPU performance is so similar to Richland, though. Even if it's adequate for my mobile needs, it'd be a lot easier to recommend vs. Intel CPU + ATI GPU or Vishera + ATI GPU if the CPU performance were better.

    I'd considered buying a 6475b this fall, but in the end didn't because it had Trinity rather than Richland, Kaveri was around the corner, and HP whitelists their networking cards which is a major bummer. But if there's a Kaveri notebook that also has a matte screen with more than 1366x768 pixels, has Windows 7 instead of 8, and preferably is made by someone other than HP, at a similar price point, that would be hard to pass up. I'd probably go with it over a laptop with the A10-7850K, too, since nowadays I primarily use my desktop, and thus the mobility of a 14" would now win over the screen size of a desktop replacement.
     
  8. Deks

    Deks Notebook Prophet

    Reputations:
    1,130
    Messages:
    4,742
    Likes Received:
    1,885
    Trophy Points:
    231
    All the while I was looking at the benchmarks, a thought was running through my mind:
    'Outdated software running on hardware which isn't even supported properly'.

    Granted, I'm disappointed that Steamroller Cores didn't exactly move that much away from Piledriver in performance. Certain benchmarks actually show REDUCED performance (probably because of the FPU reduction which was meant to be taken over by HSA [which only supports the premise that current day software is highly outdated and was never optimized for such usage] - then again real life programs usage such as 3ds Max did demonstrate gains... roughly 18% in multithreaded tasks I think - which is a gain yes, but a relatively small one (still it seems to be faster in this area even than an i3, the A8 version no less).

    I would definitely like to see HSA in action however - this chip was mainly designed for that first and foremost - and initial OpenOffice demonstration running HSA seems to have achieved about an 8x or 9x increase in speed.

    As for 95W APU in a laptop - I would imagine its possible, but the manufacturers would likely mess it up either way seeing how Richland APU's experience issues with throttling.

    The 45 watt version will be interesting - but I doubt we will see it in the laptop, seeing how AMD apparently noted it aims for 35W in a laptop form factor (which seems... unwarranted).
     
  9. Karamazovmm

    Karamazovmm Overthinking? Always!

    Reputations:
    2,358
    Messages:
    9,433
    Likes Received:
    200
    Trophy Points:
    231
    its the same thing as usual, cpu improvements are there, while still lagging considerably behind intel.

    the gpu improvements are good and AMD keeps favoring those

    HSA isn't out for anyone yet

    They really need to revamp those cpu cores and introduce faster the gpu architecture in their cpus, GCN is basically EOL this year and will not only be earlier than that because TSMC has screwed up again

    so all in all, not out of what I had expected. its a good improvement in terms of both cpu and gpu, more so for the latter, and AMD needs to keep going forward and planning better.
     
  10. Deks

    Deks Notebook Prophet

    Reputations:
    1,130
    Messages:
    4,742
    Likes Received:
    1,885
    Trophy Points:
    231
    With all of the revamps AMD did to Steamroller (doubled up on almost everything - which only goes to show how 'amazed' I am at some tests showing no gains whatsoever or going into the negative even), my guess is this is a classical case of the industry using outdated software - which IS a big problem.

    If the HSA foundation is to be taken into consideration (as well as AMD's consoles win), its quite possible that improving the CPU to significant degrees won't necessarily make a difference - not in the sense like improving the GPU would - and integrating HSA shouldn't demonstrate to be difficult.
    AMD did note it was designed with ease of use in mind which would save time and monetary costs as opposed to writing to classical GPGPU code - remember that Kaveri uses a shared memory where data doesn't have to be duplicated for it to be used by the GPU.

    Also... as far as graphical performance goes... Kaveri was tested without newest drivers and Mantle. It will be interesting to see how optimized drivers change things (if at all) for Kaveri (not to mention what adding Mantle to the mix could bring).

    All in all, I do think Kaveri certainly has potential - but without seeing software that can use to to the maximum, its still early to tell.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page