AMD Carrizo Laptops spotted in EU

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Deks, Jun 22, 2015.

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  1. Deks

    Deks Notebook Prophet

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    http://www.saturn.de/webapp/wcs/sto...nel=sedede&searchParams=&path=&query=FX-8800P

    700 EUR. (£500.796)
    APU: FX-8800P (2.1 GhZ base, 3.4 GhZ Turbo)
    GPU: AMD Radeon R8 M355DX
    RAM: 8GB DDR3 (No word on the speed or its timings though) - 2 x 4 GB
    Screen resolution: 1920 x 1080 (TFT LCT - Full Matte)
    HDD: 500 GB

    Specs seem decent if you ask me (unlike the HP atrocity in USA) ... though I have no idea if the 8800P was configured with 15W or 35W (I think it might be 35W considering that some people have tested this APU in a limited fashion during its presentation).
    Likely downside is that the RAM slots are filled to capacity, and that if you wanted to upgrade to more memory, you'd need to take the current sticks out and replace them with say 2 x 8 GB (low timings and high speed) which would add to the cost - but I think it would be worth it to gain an appreciable bump in APU performance and double memory capacity.
    With a RAM and SSD upgrade, this could perform quite nicely (though the price tag goes up in that case to roughly £650 or £700 - which I think is not too much when you take into account you can get these upgrades later).
     
  2. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    For almost $1K CDN (plus added taxes) this is nowhere near 'decent' specs for me.

    The RAM is half of minimum. The HDD is a... HDD... The processor is 5% better than a 2012 AMD based model... sigh...

    The screen seems like it could be decent at that size (15.6") - but not worth it with an AMD non-solution inside.

    We are effectively in Q3 2015 - anything less than a QC HT 8 thread capable system with maxed out RAM is a waste of money if the objective is keeping the system for longer than ~18 months (max). And at $1K CDN, these aren't throw away prices, imo.
     
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  3. nipsen

    nipsen Notebook Ditty

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    It has a decent 3dmark score, for running up to 35w. Not exactly a gaming laptop, but if it turns out you can run around 15w while decoding hd film, or running limited 3d applications, it's not a bad pick. Photoshop winner as well.. If you compare it to, say, a 30-17w nvidia/intel package, you're getting a lot of performance for very little battery draw. So if it turns out that someone managed to put this in a laptop with a good lithium polymer battery, and go for a power-mode that maintains a passive cooling scheme.. this might not be a bad setup. Might.
     
  4. Link4

    Link4 Notebook Deity

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    Actually the 35W FX-8800P is about 15% better than the 35W FX-7600P from 2014 so it is a significant improvement, better than the generational Intel improvement of 5-10% at least. In 15W mode though it is easily over 50% better than the FX-7500 though.
     
  5. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    No, I'm not convinced...

    See:
    http://wccftech.com/amd-carrizo-apu...amroller-die-consists-31-billion-transistors/

    Until I see a cpu passmark score of over 8K (even if it is at 35W), these are primarily netbook chips in my view - gpu performance? Don't give a damn. :)
     
  6. Deks

    Deks Notebook Prophet

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    That wccftech arcticle is from 4 months ago.
    Also, CPU Passmark is no real indication of how a system will perform in real life (its numbers are all over the place for one thing)... neither are synthetic benchmarks.

    It is accurate that AMD stated how the 35W FX-8800P is up to 15% faster than the previous iterations.
    Carrizo managed to achieve a higher single threaded IPC gain over Kaveri of about 5% with 200MhZ lower clocks (3.6 vs 3.4 GhZ), while the gains were 15% higher for multithreaded tasks in Cinebench (which I hardly think as representative).
    Then again, at 15W, Carrizo did improve IPC by 50% - mainly because the architecture is optimized for lower power.

    But as I said, this is not exactly representative of real life situations.
    The IGP was revamped to include Tonga based architecture, also including colour compression algorithms to reduce bandwidth requirements, resulting in increased performance.
    Plus there's fully fledged HSA 1.0 included - so, certain things I think will inherently be run much faster as they should be run through the HSA automatically (but, we have yet to see how Carrizo behaves in real world).

    The reason I said the specs were decent was because already Kaveri was able to manage various games at 1080p at medium settings.
    Carrizo should be able to do high at 1080p by comparison (at least) for most games.
    Plus, the Acer laptop in question comes with a 1080p screen - where exactly did we get such offers before with AMD APU's?

    Also, lack of RAM selections and SSD is on the OEM's (besides, its not like Intel systems in the same price range don't come with low performing mechanical drives and low RAM - of course they do) - but the user upgrade is not too expensive and can end up cheaper than being offered by OEM's.
    Certain Intel systems are inherently weaker by comparison in graphics alone even though they are in the same price range (if not more expensive).

    As for not keeping this kind of system for more than 18 months... uhm... there's the little thing known as DX12, which will probably alter the software scenery much to APU's favour and take advantage of the hardware a lot better as far as games go (and professional software too), because APU's (Kaveri and Carrizo) have been specifically designed to take advantage of that, so I think that the system in question would be very worthwhile to have long term (students, working parents, etc.) - plus, Photoshop already takes advantage of APU's and sees a lot of performance increase as a result without a need of a dedicated GPU.

    A beefy CPU portion is not a be all, end all any more.
    Yes, it is a contributing factor, but most people who have laptops and do everyday tasks probably don't bother themselves with that to begin with - and why would they, since the differences would be unnoticeable to them?
    All they want is a system that runs the OS fine, Youtube, Internet browsing, Word processing and other similar tasks.
    I think APU's fill this segment quite nicely, while offering a much better graphics performance which allow users to play many games at decent settings in native resolutions (this includes online games).
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2015
  7. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    As you may know, benchmark scores are not what I live or die by. But with cpu's, a PM score of 8K+ is more than 2x more useful to me than a PM score of half or less... and again, QC 8 thread capable cpu's need only apply.

    I won't repeat your whole post, sufficient to say that you're seeing the glass half full while I'm seeing the AMD glass almost empty. Each point you make is exactly the opposite of what I see in real world use of the newest platforms - gpu only matters for very limited workflows (games...) and none of the workflows I need to do (even in PS CS6).

    The latest platforms (Broadwell) show significant jumps in everyday tasks - making anything below them ancient and effectively obsolete. Yeah, the older platforms do the mundane stuff okay today... but I can see the writing on the wall and it's saying don't bother with underpowered systems because, yeah... cpu's do matter (they always will).
     
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  8. Deks

    Deks Notebook Prophet

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    Like any other benchmark... I take them with a grain of salt.
    They are at best a guideline... and as previously mentioned, not an indication of real life performance.

    We hadn't even seen Carrizo tested in 'real world' scenarios, so without knowing what it can actually do, until its put through its paces, I wouldn't make any assumptions.
    And besides, you have conveniently left out DX12 as a very important thing that will not only see acceleration of tasks in games, but professional software as well which is only now starting to make the transition into this area.

    When Kaveri was tested with HSA for instance in Libre Office, it beat even the top end desktop Intel systems by a large margin.
    As for Broadwell showing 'significan jumps' in everyday tasks... I'd definitely like to see what kind of tasks you're talking about because the average person won't be able to tell the difference for the most part.
    Performance of everyday tasks is largely dependent on the speed of your storage unit (HDD and/or SSD).
    A slow processor can certainly make things unpleasant, but APU's such as the FX-8800P are far faster than Atom's for instance and this isn't an E-450 here either.

    Also, if your workflow requires a strong single threaded CPU performance, then an AMD APU (at least ones available until now, incl. Carrizo) probably aren't for you (unless the software you use will be optimized for DX12).
    And if you also recall, I mentioned that APU's were mainly designed for everyday tasks and some occasional gaming.

    I think it would be more than viable for majority of people.
     
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  9. Link4

    Link4 Notebook Deity

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    Intel's IPC advantage over Excavator is less than 40% now, Excavator has about 75% of Broadwell's IPC which is quite good, multicore performance is on par with 28W dual core, 4 thread mobile i7s, and last time I checked they put i7 5500U in gaming laptops which is only on par with FX-7600P in multithreaded.
     
  10. Deks

    Deks Notebook Prophet

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    Good to know.
    This actually bodes well for Zen when it comes.
    AMD stated that it will feature about 40% increase in IPC alone... of course, this doesn't take into account other changes that will affect performance (namely the 1 core 2 threads design which will operate more like Intel).
    AMD is also supposedly aware of consumers desiring an APU with HBM.
    HBM2 should be ready before Zen however, so I'm hoping to see that in operation. Heck, even HBM1 would do the trick for an APU.

    At any rate, keep an eye out for more Carrizo laptops out there. Would be good to see more in circulation.
    Also, is Acer doing anything to promote these laptops with Carrizo?
     
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