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  1. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    The Magic Word — According to Neuroscience, a Single Word Could Literally Save the World
     
  2. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    6 space technologies we can use to improve life on Earth | Danielle Wood
     
  3. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    How To Write From The Heart: You’ve Got The Words To Change A Nation.
    https://medium.com/personal-growth/...got-the-words-to-change-a-nation-cc4bf2632256
    [​IMG]

    Writing is one of the best ways to connect with other people and become influential.

    The art of writing will always be timeless no matter how many people think that bite-sized content will take over — it won’t. It’s easy just to write but writing from the heart is very different.

    My writing career started when I was in high school, and my teachers kept telling me I was a brilliant writer. I never believed them and still don’t believe I am very good at it.

    With that aside, I chose to keep writing because people are inspired by my words and it’s a medium that has worked thus far.

    In the future, I will be doing more videos and public speaking, but writing will always be there.

    Even with videos and public speaking you are still required to write the content so the art of putting words together in a meaningful way is a valuable skill.

    [​IMG]
    As the years went on I stopped writing for a long time but I still was knocking out convincing emails each day, so I never actually gave up. Then, a few years back I began blogging, and that’s when I taught myself how to write from the heart.

    The second part of the title for this article comes out of a song. The phrase “You’ve got the words to change a nation,” is one of the mantras I live my life by.

    Words truly do have the power to change a nation, and you should use them for good. You should use words in everything you do to inspire others and add value to people’s lives. You should use words to live your purpose.

    Even if you have no aspiration for blogging or social media, writing is still important because a habit that will help you in life is journaling.

    The habit of writing in a journal is followed by many of the greats such as Oprah and Tony Robbins. Either way, learning to write from the heart is a must.

    So, below are my top 8 tips on how you too can write from the heart and change your nation at the same time:




    1. Write when you’re full of emotion
    The easiest way to write from the heart is when you’re having a day or period of time when you are full of emotion.

    For me, this can either be a really sad state, or a point in time when I am experiencing the phenomena known as “flow.”

    In deep emotional states, words flow out of you and are naturally tainted with emotion from your heart.

    Writing can be a great way to release negative emotions or multiply positive emotions. In these writing states, you should aim to eliminate perfection and not worry about spelling or what you’re writing.

    The key for me has been to just let the words flow out of me and then go back and edit them later — that’s how you capture raw emotion.

    The rawer the emotion is in your writing; the more heartfelt the words on the page will be to your reader. Practice this enough and you will have a large audience.

    It’s not always possible to be near a suitable space to write like your office. What I do as a simple hack is to write down phrases or ideas when I am experiencing these particular emotional states.

    Ideally, you want to finish the writing while you’re still in the state; otherwise, I have found that when you come back to it later, the emotion is gone from the topic you were writing about.





    2. Forget about how many shares you get
    This point is particularly relevant in the age of social media that we are now in. The temptation (I have it too) is to write something, post it online, and then actually give a damn about how many people share your post.

    This habitual way of approaching your writing will cause you all sorts of problems, and it will guarantee you that you don’t write from the heart.

    “Other people can’t determine your success; you must determine it yourself and your writing’s purpose should be to serve others”
    There are so many things that effect how many shares a written post will get on the various social media platforms such as time of day, the country the article is focused towards, the current topics in the news, who reads it, and finally, the platforms you post it on — forget about the number of shares!





    3. Concentrate on passion filled topics
    To write from the heart requires you to write about something you’re passionate about.

    Your heart, your passion, and your emotions are very closely linked to each other. For me, I find writing about entrepreneurship and personal development is the best way for me to write from the heart.

    The reason these two fields help me write from the heart is because they are deeply personal in their own individual ways. Entrepreneurship translates for me to family, success, money won and money lost, pain, pleasure, etc.

    Personal development translates for me to mean; a tool that turned my life around, my appreciation for Tony Robbins, the device that transformed me in business, my passion, my network of friends, and finally, me being on Addicted2Success with all of you.

    See writing from the heart and using your passion go much deeper than you think. For me, they go as deep as the depths of the ocean.





    4. Crank up the vulnerability
    If you want to not only write from the heart but change your nation at the same time then, your writing needs to be 100% vulnerable. Why?

    The reason is because so much of the world is based on hype and things that are not real. When you are vulnerable, you naturally write from the heart.

    Being vulnerable in writing and in life is not very common. People listen when you’re vulnerable, and you speak what you believe to be the truth. Vulnerability can create immense power, and it’s that power that you can use to change your nation.

    I have demonstrated this one quite a few times on our site when I have spoken about my health issues, my mortality, the anxiety I used to suffer, and my imperfections as illustrated by others.

    Each time I am vulnerable I am writing from the heart with the goal of helping others. I would love you to try this approach in your own life and watch the success come flooding in like a tidal wave.





    5. Include inspiration as much as possible
    When you endeavor to include inspiration in some form in your writing, you automatically write from the heart. The way you go even further is you include action points after the inspirational points in your writing.

    The reason for this is that the impact people will get from your inspirational points will not be reached to the maximum if you don’t write in some action points. Inspiration is meaningless without action that follows.

    Inspiration almost always leads to positive change, and I think that’s what everyone should aim for.

    “In the end, what will cause your writing to change a nation will be how much you can inspire and motivate everyone that reads your message”




    6. Be you
    You will never write from the heart if you don’t be you. Being you involves you not writing in a way that makes your brain think about how others will perceive your words. Everyone is going to get a different meaning from your words so just concentrate on pouring in emotion and being you.

    The easiest way I find to be me in my writing is to include some personal stories here and there, which highlight my message in a way that only I can do.

    Writing styles, topics, blogs and content can easily be copied, but copying how you do you is impossible, so that’s your best chance at writing from the heart.





    7. Give everything you have
    To be successful at writing from the heart, it’s crucial to give everything you have in your writing.

    Then, when you think you have given everything, reach down and try and give some more. Just like in life, the more you give, the more success you will achieve.

    The way I give everything is that I take every bit of advice and learning that I get from my daily life, and chunk it down for you into simple bite-sized points. I ensure I do this regularly and make the writing as compelling as I can so you can get the benefits of the lessons I am sharing.

    All of us can be a New York Times best Selling Author if we give everything we have and write from the heart.





    8. Get into a high energy writing state
    The final point to writing from the heart is to make sure your mind is in the right state.

    When you’re burnt out or tired, it’s hard to reach down and write from the heart. Any form of proper writing requires energy and so what I recommend is to inspire yourself before any block of writing.

    The way I change my state before I begin to write is firstly by having a shower. Showers help clear my mind and relax me. I then do ten mins of exercise to get the blood moving (trampolines work best for me).

    The next step is to make a nice herbal tea (caffeine free tea) and sit down for 30 minutes and read a personal development book — I’m currently reading “The Law Of Success.”

    The last step to getting into a high-energy writing state is to watch a motivational YouTube video. I find just typing the word motivation into YouTube gives the best results.





    ***Final Thought***
    For those that want to take writing from the heart or even living from the heart further, here is an exercise I learned from Tony Robbins recently:

    Step One — Turn on some emotional classical music from YouTube
    Step Two — Put one hand on your heart and close your eyes
    Step Three — For two minutes, think of three things you are grateful for

    This exercise will help you connect with your heart and will bring all sorts of emotions out. It’s a great way to prepare for writing something that has the power to change a nation.

    Originally posted on Addicted2Success.com





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  4. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. -Steve Jobs

    Steve Jobs’s handwritten job application from 1973 will be put up for auction in March. Jobs was only 17 or 18 when he filled out the application… and it’s riddled with mistakes. He didn’t even capitalize his last name.

    Still, probably most interesting about the application is that under phone number, he wrote ‘none’. Nowadays — largely because of Steve Jobs — everyone has a phone number.

    Need a little bit of inspiration from the man himself? Watch his 2005 Stanford Commencement Speech.
     
  5. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    Mankind in the Making - By: H. G. Wells (PDF Attached)
    wikipedia.org: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mankind_in_the_Making

    Mankind in the Making.jpg

    Contents
    Preface[edit]
    Wells proposes to "provide the first tentatives of a political doctrine that shall be equally available for application in the British Empire and the United States." He notes an "especial indebtedness to my friend, Mr. Graham Wallas."[4]

    Chapter 1: The New Republic[edit]
    Renouncing any claim to an "absolute truth" on the ethical, social, and political questions addressed in this volume, Wells says his views are "designed first for those who are predisposed for their reception." He proposes as a "general principle" a doctrine he dubs "New Republicanism," based on a view of life as "a tissue and succession of births." Only in the 19th century, with the idea of organic evolution, has such a view become "definite and pervading," "alter[ing] the perspective of every human affair" and enabling a criterion of judgment based on "wholesome and hopeful births." No existing political party is based on such a view. New Republicanism, then, exists "to get better births and a better result from the births we get."[5]

    Chapter 2: The Problem of the Birth Supply[edit]
    Because of "an absolute want of knowledge" in the domain of the "missing science of heredity," Wells rejects the notion, advanced by followers of Francis Galton like Max Nordau, that the state should try to breed human beings selectively: "we are, as a matter of fact, not a bit clear what points to breed for and what points to breed out." He argues that such supposed positive traits as beauty, health, capacity, genius (Wells does not refer to "intelligence"), as well as such supposed negative traits as criminality and alcoholism, are in fact such complex entanglements of characteristics that "ignorance and doubt bar our way." Transmission of specific diseases may be an exception. Research in this area is urgent need of support. At the level of individual action, however, New Republicans are to "use our judgments to the utmost to do each what seems to him probably right." Laws that "foster and protect the cowardly and the mean" or "guard stupidity" should be altered.[6]

    Chapter 3: Certain Wholesale Aspects of Man-Making[edit]
    As for the upbringing of children, any notion of "Nature's trustworthiness" is rejected out of hand: "The very existence and nature of man is an interference with Nature and Nature's ways." A child needs (i) "exclusively to itself" the "constant loving attention" of "a mother or. . . some well-affected girl or woman" who is in good health; (ii) warmth; (iii) shelter; (iv) cleanliness; (v) bright lights; (vi) good food; (vii) intelligent and articulate caretaking; (viii) access to skilled medical care. Wells doubts whether more than a quarter of the children born in England grow up in such conditions. He cites statistics from Clifford Allbutt's System of Medicine demonstrating class differences, and infant mortality statistics suggesting "a holocaust of children" is occurring in industrial areas like Lancashire.[7]

    Rejecting an approach to the problem via philanthropic homes because these encourage "inferior people" to have children and in any case "do not work," Wells argues that public policy ought to "discourage reckless parentage" but not lighten at all the burden of parental responsibility. He proposes that the state determine standards for the care of children, and when parents are unable to meet the standards they should be "charged with the cost of a suitable maintenance." This will discourage "inferior people" from reproducing. Also conducive to this end is a minimum wage set to allow for a life that is "wholesome, healthy. . . by the standards of comfort at the time." Industries incapable of sustaining such a wage are only "a disease and a parasite upon the public body." People unemployable at this minimum wage are "people of the Abyss" who will thus be "swept out of [their] rookeries and hiding-places." In this dispensation, "[t]hey would exist, but they would not multiply—and that is our supreme end."[8]

    Chapter 4: The Beginning of the Mind and Language[edit]
    Wells views a child at birth as "at first no more than an animal," but during the first year "a mind, a will, a personality, the beginning of all that is real and spiritual in man" "creeps in" in the course of a "process" that is "unanalyzable." What the child needs for development is "a succession of interesting things," and poor children are "least at a disadvantage" during this phase. The "almost constant presence of the mother" is ideal, and is, indeed, the reason for monogamy's "practical sanction." Simple toys that can be variously manipulated are best.[9]

    "With speech humanity begins." Wells, following Froebel, emphasizes the child's need to hear clear consistent speech, and disapproves of baby talk and of nurses speaking foreign tongues. Wells notes that "only a very small minority of English or American people have more than half mastered" English, and expostulates on the unnecessary impoverishment of English speech that is maintained as a social norm. "Saving" English is necessary "if we wish to save the future of the world." Wells advocates promoting throughout the world "one accent, one idiom, and one intonation" of English. Better materials for the teaching of language need to be developed by an "English Language Society" made up of "affluent and vigorous people." Wells also makes practical pedagogical suggestions, like advocating paraphrasing to teach writing.[10]

    Wells gives practical suggestions for the teaching of shapes and numbers; he is a great advocate of wooden blocks. He sketches the state of a child's imaginative world "at or about the fifth year," when "formal education. . . ought to begin."[11]

    Chapter 5: The Man-Making Forces of the Modern State[edit]
    A key factor in human development is the home, understood broadly as the circle of people with whom the child is in "constant, close contact." The impression of home life on the child is nearly indelible, and derives principally from

    • tradition
    • "economic necessities"
    • "the influx of new systems of thought, of feeling, and of interpretation about the general issues of life."
    In Great Britain there are three main traditions: "the aristocratic, the middle, and the labour class." But "new necessities" are remoulding them. — Schools should cultivate the habit of industry, but moral, religious, aesthetic, and philosophical instruction they are ill-equipped to give, much less the impetus to Great Britain's much needed renewal of "national energy," for the average man derives his "moral code" chiefly from his "school-fellows," not from school.[12]

    Chapter 6: Schooling[edit]
    Class instruction and learning to read and write constitute the initial stage of schooling; they mark "a stage in the civilizing process." "When tribes coalesce into nations, schools appear." Counting, and a second "culture tongue" as a key to a higher culture, are also general, though the latter is being superseded in France, Germany, Great Britain, and the United States. Wells emphasizes the tendency to introduce into the curriculum elements "irrelevant to schooling proper"; these are justifiable only if they serve "to widen the range of intercourse." Wells proposes an apparently modest but really quite ambitious curriculum. It demands a thorough overhaul of how English composition is taught, and, except for physics and some rudiments of the concepts of chemistry, regards most instruction in facts of science, history, etc., as superfluous; these are relegated to the school library and the initiative of the student. Wells also emphasizes the importance of giving children enough time for free play, which he defines as "a spontaneous employment into which imagination enters," and privacy.[13]

    Chapter 7: Political and Social Influences[edit]
    As for politics and society, New Republicanism takes the position that any institution that does not "mould men into fine and vigorous forms" must "be destroyed." Such an institution is the British monarchy, a "stupendous sham." Wells argues, referring to Ch. 3 of his earlier Anticipations (1901), that "in a sense, the British system, the pyramid of King, land-owning and land-ruling aristocracy, yeoman and trading middle-class and labourers, is dead—it died in the nineteenth century under wheels of mechanism." But an extended comparison shows that American conditions do not offer a desirable alternative. As a "crude suggestion," Wells ponders the possibility of election of public officials by juries. As for honors, Wells proposes the development of a "generally non-hereditary functional nobility." The new methods could later be extended to the control of property, for " 'We are all Socialists nowadays,' " in addition to the further development of taxing property transfers.

    Chapter 8: The Cultivation of the Imagination[edit]
    Adolescence and the awakening of sexual interest signify that "the race, the species, is claiming the individual" and indeed is "the source of all our power in life." Apart from the affirmation of the importance of motherhood and the necessity of taboos, Wells admits: "I have no System—I wish I had," no "doctrine of sexual conduct." Not rules, but wisdom for oneself and patience for others are needed. One of the functions of literature is to record "experiments in the science of this central field of human action."[14]

    "[W]e are all too careless of the quality of the stuff that reaches the eyes and ears of our children." Wells endorses censorship: "I am on the side of the Puritans here, unhesitatingly." Wells proposes that a category of "adult" art, literature, and science be recognized, and that "a high minimum price" be set for it, since few children can spend much. Alternately, an age limit could be set; Wells proposes eighteen. "[W]hat is here proposed is not so much the suppression of information as of a certain manner of presenting information, and our intention is at most to delay, and to give the wholesome aspect first." "[F]or the rest, in this matter—leave them alone."[15]

    Chapter 9: The Organization of Higher Education[edit]
    At the age of fifteen, after "nine or ten years of increasingly serious Schooling (Primary Education)," Wells would have inferior students shunted into "employment suited to their capacity, employment which should not carry with it any considerable possibility of prolific marriage," and have the others proceed to "Secondary Education, or College." Here, he stresses the importance of "good general text-books in each principal subject" developed by universities as the basis of instruction, rather than a professor's lectures. Students must be engaged in "discussion, reproduction, and dispute" of the facts and ideas of their subject—a "substantial mental training" for a specialty being more important than cultivation of a "general culture." He contemplates four possible courses for the student: "The Classical, the Historical, the Biological, and the Physical." In the third stage of education, "the University Course," lasting "for three or four years after eighteen or twenty-one," in such subjects as medicine, law, engineering, philosophy and theology, physical science, etc. Wells also insists on the importance of ensuring that "serious books" be available in public libraries, with gues to reading in various subjects.[16]

    Chapter 10: Thought in the Modern State[edit]
    Upon thought depends the hope of achieving civilization, for society is now hobbled by having become "a heterogeneous confusion without any secure common grounds of action." Thought requires

    • "a sympathetic and intelligent atmosphere"
    • a "language. . . ready for. . . use"
    • "a certain minimum of training and preparation"
    • a sense that "for some reason—not necessarily a worldly one—the thing [is] 'worth while.'"
    "Literature is a vitally necessary function of the modern state." What is most needed at present in English thought is to put "critical literature" on a sound footing, and Wells proposes the organization of "a large Guild of literary men and women," as well as "university lectureships and readerships in contemporary criticism." As for literature, Wells argues that "it is only by the payment of authors, and if necessary their endowment in a spacious manner, and in particular by the entire separation of the rewards of writing from the accidents of the book market, that the function of literature can be adequately discharged in the modern state." This should be awarded not by a single body but according to the principle of "Many Channels," and inclusively rather than exclusively: if many "shams" are subsidized, "it scarcely matters." Further, in order to "protect the author from the pressure of immediate necessities," copyright should rest inalienably in his hands, any countervailing arrangement being limited to term of seven years, unless the author void copyright altogether as a "present to the world." Wells suggests the endowment of "a thousand or so authors," and offers, a detailed plan of how this could be done, as "an efficient starting-point" that will doubtless be developed in many directions, a process he calls the "innervation of society."[17]

    Chapter 11: The Man's Own Share[edit]
    Wells's vision of "New Republicanism" culminates in "the rough outline of an ideal new state, a New Republic, a great confederation of English-speaking republican communities, each with its non-hereditary aristocracy, scattered about the world, speaking a common language, possessing a common literature and a common scientific and, in its higher stages at least, a common educational organization." Many "pioneers and experimenters" are already working to fulfill this vision. "n a few years" this "will have become a great world movement," though only "the young" (under thirty) will see "the Promised Land." Only "a few thousands" of devoted New Republicans are needed to realize this vision.

    Appendix: A Paper on Administrative Areas Read before the Fabian Society [March 1903][edit]
    Wells rejects communistic socialism and proclaims himself a "moderate socialist" whose goal is "equality of opportunity and freedom for complete individual development." His argument against "private owners" and in favor of "public officials" is based on the principle of efficiency. And this is his reason for condemning existing "local government bodies" as "impossibly small," because "a revolution in the methods of locomotion" has fundamentally altered the economy. Administrators need to adjust to "a larger community of a new type," as Wells explained in Anticipations. In southern England this should embrace "the whole valley of the Thames and its tributaries" as well as "Sussex and Surrey, and the east coast counties up to the Wash," i.e. all of southeastern England.

    Composition[edit]

    The success of Anticipations in 1901 led to a demand for a sequel, which Wells wrote while his wife was pregnant with his second child, Frank Richard, born on Oct. 31, 1903.[18]

    Graham Wallas greatly influenced Mankind in the Making, especially the first few chapters.[19] Their collaboration on the book occasioned on Sept. 19, 1902, one of Wells's longest and most revealing letters.[20] Shortly after the publication of Mankind in the Making Wells and Wallas hiked for two weeks in Switzerland; their exchanges greatly influenced Wells's next venture in social thought, A Modern Utopia.[21] Later, Wallas would also help Wells with The Work, Wealth and Happiness of Mankind (1932).

    Reception[edit]

    Wells considered Mankind in the Making weaker than his other books on modern socialism, Anticipations, A Modern Utopia, and New Worlds for Old: in his Experiment in Autobiography he describes the book as ‘my style at its worst and my matter at its thinnest, and quoting it makes me feel very sympathetic with those critics who, to put it mildly, restrain their admiration for me.’ It was praised, though, by Henry James, Leopold Amery, Ford Madox Ford, Ray Lankester, Morley Roberts, Violet Paget (Vernon Lee), and C.F.G. Masterman; many of them, however, found it excessively optimistic.[22] Arnold Bennett called the book sloppy in thought and turgid in expression.[23] Joseph Conrad thought it showed Wells to be "so strangely conservative at bottom."[24]

    Wells was disappointed that most reviewers took the book as categorical and predictive rather than as tentative and exploratory.[25]
     

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  6. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    With Love and Without Love
     
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    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    Don Miguel Ruiz: How to Not Take Things Personally | SuperSoul Sunday | Oprah Winfrey Network

     
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