All about Wisdom Thread, Quotes, Pictures, Articles, Discussions

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Dr. AMK, Jan 1, 2018.

  1. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    The main goal here is to have a dedicated thread to all subjects can be a value to our soul, heart, brain, body, to make us feel better in our life, to be a guide to fix some of our problems, to solve some of our conflicts ,to make our world better place to live in for us and for the future generations.
    We can use Quotes from others, or we can write and tell our own, we can open a discussion, someone can share his experience to give us insight about something important, or someone can share his problem and we can advise.

    wisdom.png
    Pyramid_of_Knowledge_Artefacts.jpg
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2018
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  2. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    Reserved.
     
  3. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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  4. Tinderbox (UK)

    Tinderbox (UK) Sir Pumpkin Longshanks

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    [​IMG]
    John.
     
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  5. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    The lower your social class, the ‘wiser’ you are, suggests new study
    Growing up working class gives people social skills that help broaden their perspective during conflicts.
    By Michael PriceDec. 20, 2017 , 10:15 AM
    http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/12/lower-your-social-class-wiser-you-are-suggests-new-study

    "There’s an apparent paradox in modern life: Society as a whole is getting smarter, yet we aren’t any closer to figuring out how to all get along. “How is it possible that we have just as many, if not more, conflicts as before?” asks social psychologist Igor Grossmann at the University of Waterloo in Canada.

    The answer is that raw intelligence doesn’t reduce conflict, he asserts. Wisdom does. Such wisdom—in effect, the ability to take the perspectives of others into account and aim for compromise—comes much more naturally to those who grow up poor or working class, according to a new study by Grossman and colleagues.

    “This work represents the cutting edge in wisdom research,” says Eranda Jayawickreme, a social psychologist at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

    To conduct the study, Grossmann and his graduate student Justin Brienza embarked on a two-part experiment. First, they asked 2145 people throughout the United States to take an online survey. Participants were asked to remember a recent conflict they had with someone, such as an argument with a spouse or a fight with a friend. They then answered 20 questions applicable to that or any conflict, including: “Did you ever consider a third-party perspective?” “How much did you try to understand the other person’s viewpoint?” and “Did you consider that you might be wrong?”

    Grossmann and Brienza crunched the data and assigned the participants both a “wise reasoning” score based on the conflict answers and a “social class” score, then plotted the two scores against one another. They found that people with the lowest social class scores—those with less income, less education, and more worries about money—scored about twice as high on the wise reasoning scale as those in the highest social class. The income and education levels ranged from working class to upper middle class; neither the very wealthy nor the very poor were well represented in the study.

    In the second part of the experiment, the duo recruited 200 people in and around Ann Arbor, Michigan, to take a standard IQ test and read three letters to the Dear Abby advice column. One letter, for example, asked about choosing sides in an argument between mutual friends. Each participant then discussed with an interviewer how they thought the situations outlined in the letters would play out. A panel of judges scored their responses according to various measures of wise reasoning. In the example above, thinking about how an outsider might view the conflict would earn points toward wisdom, whereas relying only on one’s own perspective would not.

    As with the first part of the experiment, those in lower social classes consistently had higher wise-reasoning scores than those in higher social classes, the researchers reported today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. IQ scores, however, weren’t associated one way or another with wise reasoning.

    The findings make sense, Jayawickreme says, as people who grow up in a working-class environment have to rely on shared, communal resources more than people in the middle class, and therefore hone social techniques that smooth out conflicts with their peers. Those in the middle class, in contrast, tend to focus on education, which improves their IQ scores, but they don’t put nearly as much effort into conflict resolution skills, Grossmann says.

    If you want to foster wise reasoning in yourself, Grossmann advises, try to use third-person language when thinking about conflicts. Mentally address both yourself and your conflict partner by name, for example, as it forces you to see the situation as others would see it. And seek out situations where your own experiences and expectations aren’t in the spotlight, such as by attending a multicultural movie festival or by volunteering at a homeless shelter.

    Eventually, Grossman wants to expand his study of wisdom to people at the extremes of social class. “I would not be surprised if the result is even more pronounced in the extremely wealthy, but we don’t have the data to speak to it yet,” he says. “I would love to interview Donald Trump.”
     
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  6. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    Very interesting study,
    I think those lower social class segment has specials skills supporting them how to survive in this sophisticated life. They have many experiments in their life will never happen to those segment in the higher class, this is one of the reasons why they have more wisdom than the others.

    I think that we must believe that the foundation of human relations is harmony and coexistence in peace even with different languages, religions, colors and nationalities. We must not forget that most of the conflicts that exist now in our world are made by politicians and some stakeholders who are not really interested in the interests of their people but care about their personal interests and ambitions with hidden agendas, they are seeking more power to control the world, all kind of media which they own already helping them to wash our minds and mislead us.
    Inside our own families we have some conflicts, but we still live together, love each others. All humanity was created from Adam and Eve, so in the deep history, we are all related to one family, all what we need that how to live together with wisdom that allow us to have the understanding and flexibility to accept each others, focusing on what common between us and invest on it, and don't make any conflicts about the uncommon.
    Just some thoughts, it's a deep study needs more time for thinking and discussions. Maybe my English not good enough, but I hope that at least it's with clear meaning.
     
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  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Wisdom of the Crowd Accurately Predicts Supreme Court Decisions
    Crowds can sometimes be wiser than the smartest individuals they contain. Now researchers have carried out the largest study of crowdsourcing in predicting SCOTUS decisions.
    by Emerging Technology from the arXiv December 26, 2017
    https://www.technologyreview.com/s/...-accurately-predicts-supreme-court-decisions/

    "FantasySCOTUS is an online fantasy league in which contestants compete by predicting decisions made by the U.S. Supreme Court. Players are ranked as in any fantasy league, and the best performers can win prizes such as a “Golden Gavel” and even $10,000 in cash.

    Since 2011, some 7,000 players have made over 600,000 predictions about the outcome of over 400 Supreme Court decisions. These people do not need any special qualification and entry is free, although prizes are limited to U.S. citizens. Players can come and go as they please, taking part in some predictions but not others.

    All that makes this an interesting group. Social scientists have long been interested in the wisdom of crowds—the phenomenon in which large numbers of individuals, seemingly acting independently, can together make surprisingly accurate decisions, sometimes even better than the smartest among them."
     
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  8. Fishon

    Fishon I Will Close You

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    Leadership Lessons From Dancing Guy

     
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  9. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    Another leadership example, watch it to the end if you have time, see how he managed his orchestra and how he respecting and appreciating them so much, and how they obey every single movement from his hands..:
     
  10. killkenny1

    killkenny1 Too weird to live, too rare to die.

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    "Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life." - Terry Pratchett.

    Am I doing this right?
     
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