All about implementing Microchips in Humans

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Dr. AMK, Jul 25, 2017.

  1. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    This is just a start, injecting chips in some people here and there in different countries and different companies, step by step, they have all time they need, then no one can live without that chips anymore, I hope they fail in their plans, but I see that they have a progress already,
     
  2. Jarhead

    Jarhead 恋の♡アカサタナ

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    So long as it remains optional, that’s always a chance. For example, back a few years ago the “control all the people” plan was social media, and word on the street is that those who don’t have a social media account would have a much harder time getting a job. Though at least in my personal experience, I’m holding down a W-2 despite having an inactive Facebook account and absolutely no Twitter, Instagram, etc account. NBR is probably the closest thing I have to a social media site ;)
     
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  3. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    You can't hide from them that simple, they have all your information, communications and locations...etc. Optional... yes, you will see it will not be an optional choice in the near future. They will convince you someday to inject yourself and pay $$$$ for it, and you will be willing to do it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2018
  4. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    The value of any human will be just a code inside a chip injected to his body, once they don't like someone, they just delete his code, or stop his chip, just shut him down.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2017
  5. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    Excuse me, but would you like this chip in your vein or your brain?
    https://thefinanser.com/2018/02/excuse-like-chip-vein-brain.html/
    Lots of people talk a good talk about the internet of things and how my washing machine could now make purchases but my question is: what would my washing machine want to buy? More powder and some salt maybe? A replacement for the dish that just broke? An intelligent washing machine buying things on the internet is the least visionary thing I could think of, to be honest. However, I can see a more intelligent future where things do order on my behalf.

    We already have intelligent televisions and cars that can order entertainment and pay tolls without having to lift a finger. Equally, I can imagine a day where I’m just walking around and things are resolved without batting an eyelid. Where my clothes can make contactless payments as I walk around the City, or where a chip inside identifies me and sorts out the debits and credits as I live my life.

    The chip inside idea has been around for a long time. Over ten years ago, I was talking about the Barcelona Baja Beach Club and the chip inside night clubbers. The idea was that VIP guests would have an NFC chip implanted to save them having to carry around wallets and purses in their swimming trunks and bikinis. Nice idea, but it never took off, probably because the chips were so difficult to remove.

    I have seen this idea again recently in Stockholm, where there is an NFC chip inside scheme available to save you having to pay on the train. Talking with someone who has the implant, I hear that it makes life easier as you don’t have to have any money on you. However, it has a few downsides as it is currently only available on the train and, if you work at Epicenter, you will need a second chip inserted to operate doors and pay for smoothies.

    This was always the question that arose when I talked about having a chip inside: how many chips? Will I need my work chip inside; my payment chip inside from Visa and another one from MasterCard; another government chip; and a chip for the metro? I always thought it was a fairly fatuous question as, over time, I am sure we will have programmable chips where you can have multiple services running inside you:

    Walking through an airport and the chip identifies you so no need for passports or security scans;

    Eating a meal, the chip monitors your carbohydrates and proteins, and alerts you to reaching or exceeding limits; and

    Monitoring your heart and blood flow, the chip alerts the doctor if you are showing signs of an impending heart attack or stroke.

    Effectively, it’s the mobile phone functionality now internalised, and allows you to enjoy a wide range of services, including being found if lost which will be a strong incentive for parents to chip children. After all, we chip our pets so why not our family?

    Now I know a lot of people think that this is a scary future, but George Orwell would be aghast at the access to information governments have today through our mobile devices. Some fear the Chinese internet giants and what they share with the Chinese government, but does anyone seriously believe the NSA isn’t tapping into Facebook and Twitter?

    Give it twenty years or less, and we will all be chipped. We will be wirelessly communicating with our devices and our devices will be talking to us through thoughts rather than texts. Looks like an interesting future.

    For example Bryan Johnson, the former founder of payments company Braintree spoke at the Code conference, about how he has now invested $100 million of his own money in a new firm called Kernel with the aim of putting a chip in your brain. His team of neuroscientists and engineers not only want to use technology to restore brain activity in the case of neural diseases, they also want to make the human brain better. Like a computer, they see the brain as something that could be hacked to make it smarter: telepathic communication, elimination of cognitive biases and the ability to download skills, matrix-style.

    The day of the cyborgs is coming.
     
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  6. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    Microchip implant (human)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microchip_implant_(human)
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    For use in animals, see
    Microchip implant (animal).
    [​IMG]
    A surgeon implants British scientist Dr Mark Gasson in his left hand with an RFID microchip (March 16, 2009)
    A human microchip implant is typically an identifying integrated circuit device or RFID transponder encased in silicate glass and implanted in the body of a human being. This type of subdermal implant usually contains a unique ID number that can be linked to information contained in an external database, such as personal identification, law enforcement, medical history, medications, allergies, and contact information.
    Contents
    [1History


    History[edit]
    The first experiments with an RFID implant were carried out in 1998 by the British scientist Kevin Warwick.[1][2][3][4][5] His implant was used to open doors, switch on lights, and cause verbal output within a building. After nine days the implant was removed and has since been held in the Science Museum (London).[citation needed]

    On 16 March 2009 British scientist Mark Gasson had an advanced glass capsule RFID device surgically implanted into his left hand. In April 2010 Gasson's team demonstrated how a computer virus could wirelessly infect his implant and then be transmitted on to other systems.[6] Gasson reasoned that with implanted technology the separation between man and machine can become theoretical because the technology can be perceived by the human as being a part of their body. Because of this development in our understanding of what constitutes our body and its boundaries he became credited as being the first human infected by a computer virus. He has no plans to remove his implant.[7]

    Hobbyists[edit]
    [​IMG]
    An RFID tag visible under the skin soon after being implanted.
    Several hobbyists have placed RFID microchip implants into their hands or had them inserted by others.

    Amal Graafstra,[8] author of the book RFID Toys,[9] asked doctors to place implants in his hands in March 2005. A cosmetic surgeon used a scalpel to place a microchip in his left hand, and his family doctor injected a chip into his right hand using a veterinary Avid injector kit. Graafstra uses the implants to access his home, open car doors, and to log on to his computer. With public interest growing, in 2013 he launched biohacking company Dangerous Things[10] and crowdfunded the world's first implantable NFC transponder in 2014.[11] Spoken at various events and promotional gigs[12] including TEDx,[13] built a smartgun that only fires after reading his implant.[14]

    Alejandro Hernandez CEO of Futura is known to be the first in Central America to have Dangerous Things' transponder installed in his left hand by Federico Cortes in November 2017.

    Mikey Sklar had a chip implanted into his left hand and filmed the procedure.[15]

    Jonathan Oxer self-implanted an RFID chip in his arm using a veterinary implantation tool.[16]

    Martijn Wismeijer, Dutch marketing manager for Bitcoin ATM manufacturer General Bytes, placed RFID chips in both of his hands to store his Bitcoin private keys and business card.[17]

    Patric Lanhed sent a “bio-payment” of one euro worth of Bitcoin using a chip embedded in his hand. [18]

    Marcel Varallo had an NXP chip coated in Bioglass 8625 inserted into his hand between his forefinger and thumb allowing him to open secure elevators and doors at work, print from secure printers, unlock his mobile phone and home, and store his digital business card for transfer to mobile phones enabled for NFC. [19]

    Biohacker Hannes Sjöblad has been experimenting with NFC (Near Field Communication) chip implants since 2015. During his talk at Echappée Voléé 2016 in Paris, Sjöblad disclosed that he has also implanted himself between his forefinger and thumb and uses it to unlock doors, make payments, and unlock his phone (essentially replacing anything you can put in your pockets).[20] Additionally, Sjöblad has hosted several "implant parties," where interested individuals can also be implanted with the chip.[21]

    Commercial implants[edit]
    Medical records[edit]
    Researchers have examined microchip implants in humans in the medical field and they indicate that there are potential benefits and risks to incorporating the device in the medical field. For example, it could be beneficial for noncompliant patients but still poses great risks for potential misuse of the device.[22]

    Destron Fearing, a subsidiary of Digital Angel, initially developed the technology for the VeriChip.[23]

    In 2004, the VeriChip implanted device and reader were classified as Class II: General controls with special controls by the FDA;[24] that year the FDA also published a draft guidance describing the special controls required to market such devices.[25]

    About the size of a grain of rice, the device was typically implanted between the shoulder and elbow area of an individual’s right arm. Once scanned at the proper frequency, the chip responded with a unique 16-digit number which could be then linked with information about the user held on a database for identity verification, medical records access and other uses. The insertion procedure was performed under local anesthetic in a physician's office.[26][27]

    Privacy advocates raised concerns regarding potential abuse of the chip, with some warning that adoption by governments as a compulsory identification program could lead to erosion of civil liberties, as well as identity theft if the device should be hacked.[27][28][29] Another ethical dilemma posed by the technology, is that people with dementia could possibly benefit the most from an implanted device that contained their medical records, but issues of informed consent are the most difficult in precisely such people.[30]

    Some Christian activists, including Mark Dice, the author of a book titled The Resistance Manifesto, make a link between the PositiveID and the Biblical Mark of the Beast,[31][32] prophesied to be a future requirement for buying and selling,[33] and a key element of the Book of Revelation.[34][35] Gary Wohlscheid, president of These Last Days Ministries, has argued that "Out of all the technologies with potential to be the mark of the beast, VeriChip has got the best possibility right now".[36]

    In June 2007, the American Medical Association declared that "implantable radio frequency identification (RFID) devices may help to identify patients, thereby improving the safety and efficiency of patient care, and may be used to enable secure access to patient clinical information",[37] but in the same year, news reports linking similar devices to cancer caused in laboratory animals had a devastating impact on the company's stock price and sales.[38]

    In 2010, the company, by then called "PositiveID", withdrew the product from the market due to poor sales.[39]

    In January 2012, PositiveID sold the chip assets to a company called VeriTeQ that was owned by Scott Silverman, the former CEO of Positive ID.[40]

    In 2016, JAMM Technologies acquired the chip assets from VeriTeQ; JAMM's business plan was to partner with companies selling implanted medical devices and use the RfID tags to monitor and identify the devices.[41]

    Building access and security[edit]
    In February 2006, CityWatcher, Inc. of Cincinnati, OH became the first company in the world to implant microchips into their employees as part of their building access control and security system. The workers needed the implants to access the company's secure video tape room, as documented in USA Today.[42] The project was initiated and implemented by Six Sigma Security, Inc. The VeriChip Corporation had originally marketed the implant as a way to restrict access to secure facilities such as power plants.

    A major drawback for such systems is the relative ease with which the 16-digit ID number contained in a chip implant can be obtained and cloned using a hand-held device, a problem that has been demonstrated publicly by security researcher Jonathan Westhues[43] and documented in the May 2006 issue of Wired magazine,[44] among other places.

    • The Baja Beach Club, a nightclub in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, once used VeriChip implants for identifying VIP guests.[45]
    • The Epicenter in Stockholm, Sweden is using RFID implants for employees to operate security doors, copiers, and pay for lunch.[46]
    Possible future applications[edit]
    In 2017 Mike Miller, chief executive of the World Olympians Association, was widely reported as suggesting the use of such implants in athletes in an attempt to reduce problems in sport due to drug taking.[47]

    Theoretically, a GPS-enabled chip could one day make it possible for individuals to be physically located by latitude, longitude, altitude, speed, and direction of movement. Such implantable GPS devices are not technically feasible at this time. However, if widely deployed at some future point, implantable GPS devices could conceivably allow authorities to locate missing persons and/or fugitives and those who fled from a crime scene. Critics contend, however, that the technology could lead to political repression as governments could use implants to track and persecute human rights activists, labor activists, civil dissidents, and political opponents; criminals and domestic abusers could use them to stalk and harass their victims; and child abusers could use them to locate and abduct children.

    Another suggested application for a tracking implant, discussed in 2008 by the legislature of Indonesia's Irian Jaya would be to monitor the activities of persons infected with HIV, aimed at reducing their chances of infecting other people.[48][49] The microchipping section was not, however, included into the final version of the provincial HIV/AIDS Handling bylaw passed by the legislature in December 2008.[50] With current technology, this would not be workable anyway, since there is no implantable device on the market with GPS tracking capability.

    Since modern payment methods rely upon RFID/NFC, it is thought that implantable microchips, if they were to ever become popular in use, would form a part of the cashless society.[51] Verichip implants have already been used in nightclubs such as the Baja club for such a purpose, allowing patrons to purchase drinks with their implantable microchip.

    Potential problems[edit]
    Cancer[edit]
    In a self-published report[52] anti-RFID advocate Katherine Albrecht, who refers to RFID devices as "spy chips", cites veterinary and toxicological studies carried out from 1996 to 2006 which found lab rodents injected with microchips as an incidental part of unrelated experiments and dogs implanted with identification microchips sometimes developed cancerous tumors at the injection site (subcutaneous sarcomas) as evidence of a human implantation risk.[53] However, the link between foreign-body tumorigenesis in lab animals and implantation in humans has been publicly refuted as erroneous and misleading[54] and the report's author has been criticized over the use of "provocative" language "not based in scientific fact".[55] Notably, none of the studies cited specifically set out to investigate the cancer risk of implanted microchips and so none of the studies had a control group of animals that did not get implanted. While the issue is considered worthy of further investigation, one of the studies cited cautioned "Blind leaps from the detection of tumors to the prediction of human health risk should be avoided".[56][57][58]

    Security risks[edit]
    The Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs (CEJA) of the American Medical Association published a report in 2007 alleging that RFID implanted chips may compromise privacy because there is no assurance that the information contained in the chip can be properly protected.[59]

    Legislation[edit]
    [​IMG]
    The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view of the subject. You may improve this article, discuss the issue on the talk page, or create a new article, as appropriate. (August 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)
    United States[edit]
    Following Wisconsin and North Dakota,[60] California issued Senate Bill 362 in 2007, which makes it illegal to force a person to have a microchip implanted, and provide for an assessment of civil penalties against violators of the bill.[60]

    In 2008, Oklahoma passed 63 OK Stat § 63-1-1430 (2008 S.B. 47), that bans involuntary microchip implants in humans.[61][62]

    On April 5, 2010, the Georgia Senate passed Senate Bill 235 that prohibits forced microchip implants in humans and that would make it a misdemeanor for anyone to require them, including employers.[63] The bill would allow voluntary microchip implants, as long as they are performed by a physician and regulated by the Georgia Composite Medical Board. The state's House of Representatives did not take up the measure.[citation needed]

    On February 10, 2010, Virginia's House of Delegates also passed a bill that forbids companies from forcing their employees to be implanted with tracking devices.[64]

    Washington State House Bill 1142-2009-10 orders a study using implanted radio frequency identification or other similar technology to electronically monitor sex offenders and other felons.[65]
     
  7. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    FBI, CoinBase and BitCOiN
     
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  8. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    MUST WATCH - The SCARIEST 3-1/2 Minutes EVER! - 5G will Weaponize Everything
     
  9. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    Swedish Company Implanting Workers With Microchips - Transhumanist Agenda
     
  10. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    First US Company Offers Microchip Implants To Employees
     

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