All about 5G Technologies

Discussion in 'Smartphones and Tablets' started by Dr. AMK, Apr 17, 2017.

  1. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    Samsung's Exynos modem will make 5G phones real | Engadget Today
     
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  2. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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  3. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Bay Area city blocks 5G deployments over cancer concerns
    Danny Crichton@dannycrichton / Yesterday
    https://techcrunch.com/2018/09/10/bay-area-city-blocks-5g-deployments-over-cancer-concerns/

    "The Bay Area may be the center of the global technology industry, but that hasn’t stopped one wealthy enclave from protecting itself from the future.

    The city council of Mill Valley, a small town located just a few miles north of San Francisco, voted unanimously late last week to effectively block deployments of small-cell 5G wireless towers in the city’s residential areas.

    Through an urgency ordinance, which allows the city council to immediately enact regulations that affect the health and safety of the community, the restrictions and prohibitions will be put into force immediately for all future applications to site 5G telecommunications equipment in the city. Applications for commercial districts are permitted under the passed ordinance.

    The ordinance was driven by community concerns over the health effects of 5G wireless antennas. According to the city, it received 145 pieces of correspondence from citizens voicing opposition to the technology, compared to just five letters in support of it — a ratio of 29 to 1. While that may not sound like much, the city’s population is roughly 14,000, indicating that about 1% of the population had voiced an opinion on the matter.

    Blocks on 5G deployments are nothing new for Marin County, where other cities including San Anselmo and Ross have passed similar ordinances designed to thwart 5G expansion efforts over health concerns.

    These restrictions on small cell site deployments could complicate 5G’s upcoming nationwide rollout. While 5G standards have yet to be standardized, one model that has broad traction in the telecommunications industry is to use so-called “small cell” antennas to increase bandwidth and connection quality while reducing infrastructure and power costs.

    Smaller antennas are easier to install and will be loss obtrusive, reducing the concerns of urban preservationists to unsightly tower masts that have long plagued the deployment of 4G antennas in communities across the United States.

    Perhaps most importantly, these small cells emit less radiation, since they are not designed to provide as wide of coverage as traditional cell sites. The telecom industry has long vociferously denied a link between antennas and health outcomes, although California’s Department of Public Health has issued warnings about potential health effects of personal cell phone antennas. Reduced radiation emissions from 5G antennas compared to 4G antennas would presumably further reduce any health effects of this technology.

    Restrictions like Mill Valley’s will make it nearly impossible to deploy 5G in a timely manner. As one industry representative told me in an interview a few months ago, “It takes 18 months to get the permit to deploy, and 2 hours to install.” Multiplied by the hundreds of sites required to cover a reasonably-sized urban neighborhood, and the 5G rollout goes beyond daunting to well-near impossible.

    While health concerns have bubbled in various municipalities, those concerns are not shared globally. China, through companies like Huawei, is investing billions of dollars to design and build 5G infrastructure, in hopes of stealing the industry crown from the United States, which is the market leader in 4G technologies.

    Those competitive concerns have increasingly been a priority at the FCC, where chairman Ajit Pai and his fellow Republican commissioners have pushed hard to overcome local concerns around health and historical preservation. The commission voted earlier this year on new siting rules that would accelerate 5G adoption.

    Mill Valley’s ordinance is designed to frustrate those efforts, while remaining within the letter of federal law, which preempts local ordinances. Mill Valley’s mayor has said that the city will look to create a final ordinance over the next year."

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    Last edited: Sep 12, 2018
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  4. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Last edited: Dec 9, 2018
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  5. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    The Problem with a 5G Phone
     
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  6. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    AT&T’s 5G network goes live in 12 cities — but you can’t use it yet
    5G device sales don’t start until next year
    By Jacob Kastrenakes@jake_k Dec 18, 2018, 9:52am EST
    https://www.theverge.com/2018/12/18/18146246/att-5g-us-launch-hotspot-service-plan-price

    "AT&T says its 5G network went live in parts of 12 cities this morning, making it the first wireless carrier to launch a mobile network based on the 5G standard.

    A small number of customers will be able to use the network starting on Friday when AT&T will begin distributing its first 5G device: a mobile hot spot that can connect to the network’s much faster airwaves.

    But it’ll be a slow launch; you won’t be able to go out to a store and buy AT&T’s 5G hot spot for several more months. For now, AT&T is reaching out to businesses in the area and inviting them to try out the new tech, seemingly as a way to ease in the network and make sure it’s working well before bringing more and more people onto the service.

    AT&T won’t charge customers for the hot spot or their 5G service during this launch period. Sometime in the spring, AT&T will begin selling the hot spot for $499. AT&T is also announcing the price of its first 5G plan: $70 per month for 15GB.

    The announcement suggests that future 5G devices will also require “5G compatible” data plans in order to connect to the faster network. That initial plan is more expensive than the LTE plan offered with a similar 4G hot spot ($50 for 10GB), but it also offers more data.

    And despite the hot spot launching this week, AT&T still isn’t offering real-world speed estimates. A spokesperson said the hot spot has peak theoretical speeds of 1.2 Gbps, but that “actual speeds will be lower.”

    That’s not a huge surprise. AT&T was one of the carriers demoing “real world” 5G at a conference earlier this month, where the demoed speeds topped out at around 140 Mbps. That’s still around 3x faster than a typical LTE connection, but it’s nowhere near the gigabit speeds that we’ve been promised from 5G.

    AT&T’s 5G network launched in Atlanta, Charlotte, Dallas, Houston, Indianapolis, Jacksonville, Louisville, Oklahoma City, New Orleans, Raleigh, San Antonio, and Waco.

    In the next six months, AT&T also plans to expand to Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Nashville, Orlando, San Diego, San Francisco, and San Jose. In all cases, the network will only be present in “parts of” these cities.

    The United States’ other major wireless carriers are also planning to launch their 5G networks in the months ahead as well. T-Mobile promised to have 5G up and running in 30 cities this year, with actual usage starting in 2019.

    Verizon is planning a 5G hot spot for “early” next year (and already launched a kind of-sort of 5G home internet service), and Sprint says it’ll have a 5G smartphone in the first half of the year.

    AT&T said in January that it would have a 5G network live before the end of 2018. With today’s announcement, it seems to have met that goal, even if this is a very, very soft launch."
     
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  7. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    New 5G technology will soon be available to every American household.
    This will mark one of the biggest technological shifts
    of a generation.

    ... and early investors could see skyrocketing returns
    https://www.angelnexus.com/o/web/187381
    Capture.JPG
     
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  8. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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  9. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    5G in 2019: The benefits, rollout and challenges at CES 2019
     
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