Alienware Area 51 PSU to GPU: 2 cables?

Discussion in 'Alienware Desktops' started by verysame, Jan 4, 2018.

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  1. verysame

    verysame Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hi there,

    I want to install a new GTX 1080ti and I noticed that the current video card has two PSU cables connected to it.
    Is that necessary? Can I use just one, or do I need two?

    Thanks
     
  2. Cass-Olé

    Cass-Olé Notebook Consultant

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    you need two cables. There are single cables with a jumper, but those are only rated up to 225watt cards

    There are some graphics cards on the market that are outfitted with two or three PCIe slots. The power consumption of such cards is usually more than 225 watts, therefore customers must use two separate PCIe cables to safely connect them to the power supply.
    [​IMG]
    It is very important to use a separate PCIe cable per slot with only one of the connectors attached to the GPU.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. verysame

    verysame Notebook Enthusiast

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 4, 2018
  4. Cass-Olé

    Cass-Olé Notebook Consultant

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    [​IMG]
    The 6pin or 6+2 that plugs into the splitter above is only rated for 150watts by ATX standards / specs, so let's back up. A 225watt card pulls 75w from the PCI-E slot & the remaining 150w through the solo cable (whether that cable is an 8pin or dual-8pin ie has a jumper as in the original top photo). A 250w card like Ti or Tx needs two cables to reduce the power draw through either cable, where each cable / 8pin is rated at 150w max (two cables can power a 375w card > 75w through PCI-E slot, 150w through each cable)

    The Seasonic Chart I posted for you advises not to 'jump' 8pins onto high-power cards so as not to exceed the 150w per 8pin rating; to do so, the wires get hot & normally the connector end melts > the splitter you intend to get is no different than the photo that says 'don't do this', they're both effectively one 150watt 8pin cable with two heads on it

    Whether it's a single 8pin, an 8 + jumper 8, or using a splitter, no matter how many heads it wears, it's still just one cable running it all, one 150watt cable by the way. You use two cables per card to reduce stress, load balance & stay within specs. Cards over 225w are expected to pull more than 150w through an 8pin (regardless how many heads, it is just 8wires doing all the duty) you want 16wires to do the duty

    What is it about your PSU or setup or cables there that u feel u need a splitter for? Why not run two cables to it? Whether you have a 51 R1 or R2-R4 you should have at least two cables to plug into a Ti

    edit
    YES, two discrete cables per card > 51 R2/R4 can run 3 high-power cards because it has x6 discrete cables, 2 cables per card

    Each 8pin running off its own 8-wire cable, as in the original photo > get 16wires to your Ti, if that makes sense, below, one card x2 cables
    [​IMG]
    below,. 2 high-power cards = x4 cables
    [​IMG]

    only a standard 1080 would use a side jumper or a splitter, because they'd be rated 225w or less > Ti Tx need two discrete cables since they pull 250watts, quite a bit more when overclocked
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2018
  5. verysame

    verysame Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hi Cass-Ole',

    Sorry for the confusion.
    I actually have another cable already and, from the illustration you posted above I understand I need two. So, basically, I need an extra cable which from my understanding doesn't matter if it splits or not, as long as I plug two separate cables.
    Did I get it right?

    Thanks for helping!
     
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  6. verysame

    verysame Notebook Enthusiast

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    Awesome, thank you again!
     
  7. verysame

    verysame Notebook Enthusiast

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    It turns out is extremely difficult to find that type of cable!
    From my understanding, it's supposed to be a 6 PIN Male to 8 (6+2) PIN Male.
    Which is actually the same cable I have as a spare from my previous PC:
    20180106_112925.jpg
    20180106_112948.jpg

    But when I look around I can only find 6 Pin Female to 8 (6+2) Male.
    It's odd, is it possible no one sells these cables?
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2018
  8. Cass-Olé

    Cass-Olé Notebook Consultant

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    if those are pics from your prior PSU, when buying PSU parts, male pins are pointy, females are holes like the photo, therefore you posted two pics of female connectors (female, because they house female pins). Males would be the adapter end that females plug into

    Top pic in this thread is a yellow 6pin male to dual-8pin female
    • 6pin end = male because it has pointy pins
    • 8pin ends = female because they'll accept the pointy end of Grfx card pins
    PSU modular cables are female at both ends
    It is typically the female end that needs an adapter extension, only males can do that

    Adapter cables / extensions are almost exclusively the male to female type

    You have a 51 R1 or R2-R4 - so again - why the need for an adapter at all? You should have plenty of discrete Grfx cables, no adapter required

    Post a photo of your rig and describe wth you're trying to accomplish and why

    Also, knowing that males are pointy / females have holes, what cable type do u say is hard to find?
     
  9. verysame

    verysame Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hi Cass-Ole',

    Here's my rig, hope the picture I took is enough to show the situation:
    20180104_012556.jpg

    Basically, I have a second GTX 1080ti that I want to add.
    The cable I posted above is from my previous PC and I tried it on the Alienware and it seems to work just fine, so I can connect the cable to the PSU of my A51 R3 to the new GTX.
    I only need one more cable to properly power the GTX (from our prior conversation), but I'm struggling finding a copy of the cable I already have.
     
  10. Cass-Olé

    Cass-Olé Notebook Consultant

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    [​IMG]
    1st of all, power supply cables from different brands are almost never compatible, so if yours works, you got lucky. Note the front panel pinout above, bottom row black is the Grfx bank: most brands put 12volts in the top 6pin (or 8pin if it has an 8), here they've fropped 12v into the bottom row. For that spare cable you have to truly work, 12volts has to be pre-wired into the bottom row of the 6pin PSU end of the cable (note how your factory cable is x3 yellow wires in bottom)
    • factory cable is a 6+2
    • the 6pin part installs upside-down, latch underneath
    • when upside-down, the 12v (yellow) wires are installed into the slots we would call the bottom row, right?
    • you'd need a voltmeter --> with 'spare' cable inserted into PSU you have to read 12volts at the Grfx end (in the 6pin part of the 6+2) in the bottom row, while all the other 5 slots read as ground (the 6+2 is an 8pin afterall, where x3 are 12v in bottom row, x5 are grounds everywhere else
    [​IMG]
    Connector Chart for 6pin Grfx 8pin Grfx (the end that plugs into a Grfx card

    So you have both charts, one for PSU end of cable, one for Grfx end of cable: the only 'spare' cable from some other brand that would work has to output 12volts in the bottom row of the 6pin part of the 6+2 --> any deviation from the pinout could ruin your Grfx card --> for instance if the 'spare cable' is in fact pinned out for some other PSU where 12volts in that PSU is designed to come from the top row of the modular 6pin end > that'd ruin your card I'd think since wires would be crossed

    I'm curious too because the black row of your PSU has x4 cables plugged in --. are you saying you bought a Grfx card from the Aliens and they only tossed in one Grfx cable set for it? Gave you no extras? If so, #1 I'd demand a free set of cables, #2, each cable has a part tag on it, so at worst you'd contact Dell and hand them the part #'s off the tags & buy a set

    I'd only use a spare set of cables from some other brand after I verify the pinout
    • when plugged in, voltmeter has to read 12v in the bottom row of the 6pin part, x5 grounds everywhere else per Grfx Chart
    • do not plug into Ti until 'spares' are verified
    I'll make an edit here in a minute & post the part #'s for the R2 Grfx cables, which you'd use if the R3/R4 cables can't be bought right now (again, try to get a free pair from Dellware)
    _________________
    [​IMG]
    my x3 R2 cables​
    New R4 cables. the wire color may be a shade off but the power supplies are all the same, shared, therefore all R2 R3 R4 can share all cables, 'compatible'
    R2 Grfx cables, CABLE 'R1/R2' = TMR06 >< CABLE R5/R6 = JPV3Y
    [​IMG]
    honestly. based on this? It shows you have x4 Grfx plugged in
    don't you have a pair of R1/R2 + a pair of R5/R6 per the tags?​

    The Grfx cables are normally bunched together with white zip ties to keep the pairs together
    [​IMG]
    it feels like I'm literally looking at x4 factory cables there
    an R1/R2 set + R5/R6 set​
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2018
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