Acer Predator (Vega 56+Ryzen 2) Helios 500

Discussion in 'Acer' started by ThatOldGuy, Jun 3, 2018.

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  1. Fastidious Reader

    Fastidious Reader Notebook Evangelist

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    Well whatever its design its made up of three chips. would one apply compound to all three or what?
     
  2. ajc9988

    ajc9988 Death by a thousand paper cuts

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    So you are talking an APU with one Core chiplet, one I/O chiplet, and one GPU chiplet. To be honest, some form of TIM, whether it is solder, LM, or regular paste, will be applied to each. If able to be delidded like their current APUs, you would apply it to all dies. This would be to allow heat to transfer to the IHS so that it could then transfer to the heat sink. The IHS is also used, at times, with chips that possess interposers to prevent crushing (these chips do not utilize interposers).

    Now, there is a skin chance that the I/O die runs cool enough to not be sinked, but then you run the gamble of longevity. But, in contra, if the Core or graphics chiplets run so much hotter, sharing the IHS could actually increase the heat and wear on the I/O chiplet. Because of the nuances of that, I will side with paste being applied to all chips until we find out otherwise. AMD is testing configurations, I'm sure, where they see the heat generated in different scenarios for the different chiplets, taking into account if no TIM is present, a chiplet would practically be in an oven scenario. There are also likely temp sensors on the silicon to do these analyses as well.

    I hope that helps.

    Sent from my SM-G900P using Tapatalk
     
  3. bobzdar

    bobzdar Notebook Enthusiast

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    He's right, vega has the gpu and hbm on the same package so you apply compound to both the gpu and hbm modules as they're all cooled by the heat sink.
     
  4. bobzdar

    bobzdar Notebook Enthusiast

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    Yes, you apply compound to the gpu and hbm modules as they're all cooled by the heatsink.
     
  5. ajc9988

    ajc9988 Death by a thousand paper cuts

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    Vega isn't a chiplet, it is a die. Just because you have an interposer and memory integrated on package does not mean that it is a chiplet.

    With that said, now that I know what was actually being said, yes, you put paste on the GPU die and both stacks of HBM.

    But, you evidently missed my point, which was thinking he was discussing chiplets, e.g. disintegrated chips where components such as memory controllers, south bridge, pcie controllers and the like were separated to a different die, with cores and cache left. The use of chiplet in his statement made me think he was referring to the upcoming Zen 2 designs. I thought the reading of my statement would have made that clear. Chalk it up to miscommunication.

    Sent from my SM-G900P using Tapatalk
     
  6. bobzdar

    bobzdar Notebook Enthusiast

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    A chiplet is a term referring to integrating multiple dies on a single package, which is exactly what the Vega56 and vega64 do. Given the context of the thread and recent discussion (acer predator helios 500, repasting it), I'd think that should be enough clue he was talking about the Vega gpu and hbm modules, all of which could be correctly refered to as chips or chiplets or dies.

    Maybe the chiplet term has been in the news recently due to the zen2 stuff, but that doesn't really have anything to do with repasting this laptop and the terminology was correct.

    In any case, I'll do some temp testing when I get mine on the stock tim and then repaste with tg kryonaut and report back as it doesn't appear it's been done yet.
     
  7. TheReciever

    TheReciever D! For Dragon!

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    I had no idea what he was talking about which is why I didnt respond lol
     
  8. Fastidious Reader

    Fastidious Reader Notebook Evangelist

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    How's the screen brightness on these units. like below 300 nits?
     
  9. bobzdar

    bobzdar Notebook Enthusiast

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  10. bobzdar

    bobzdar Notebook Enthusiast

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    Well, the Helios 500 arrived yesterday evening right as I got home from work and I've been playing around with it. When it first got here, I thought I'd made a huge mistake. The box was HUGE and really heavy, I was thinking no way this thing is even portable. However, they had packed the living hell out of it, it was nested in four different boxes with tons of packing, so when I finally got to the laptop I was relieved to find it more portable than I had expected - about half the weight was just packaging. The power brick, however, is like 3-4lbs, it's huge. So while the laptop is fairly portable, it's brought down by the brick, and you're not going anywhere without it.

    First impressions were decent, keyboard is probably the best laptop keyboard I've ever used. The keys are really nice to type on, good effort and positive clicks, but ever so slightly wobbly. Externally it's less offensive than I was expecting, it's mostly plain black except for the silver fan outputs and the Predator logo. I may black out the silver cooling surrounds and logo, not a fan of the look. The rgb on the keyboard is ok, I changed the color to a warm yellow and like it better, but the power button and touchpad are still a cold blue and I'd like to get rid of the touchpad lighting, it's not necessary in any way, or at least match it to the keyboard. One of the first things I did was go into the bios and disable the startup sound, again, not a fan. I feel like if they got rid of all of the 'gamer' touches on this thing it'd be a lot better. Give me a blacked out version without the stupid Predator branding and I'd be happy.

    Software wise, out of the box it was set to high performance power plan, which doesn't work well with Ryzen. Due to the precision boost clocks and xfr, balanced works better as high performance pins all of the cores at high clocks, leaving them all stuck at 3.4-3.5ghz. Setting it to balanced lets it clock higher on lower loads, so single core boosts up to 4.1ghz and lower 3-4 core loads will hit 3.8ghz or so and overall it runs cooler. I had to download and install Ryzen Master for the Predator sense software to work, but nbd. Radeon drivers were old, 17.12 which are about a year old, so I grabbed the latest 18.12.1 and installed those. Windows also had a bunch of updates to load. It had a few other things installed I didn't want so I uninstalled, but fairly unobtrusive and fairly easy to set up.

    Battery life with battery saver and min brightness is around 2 hours browsing the web and downloading stuff. Not good but serviceable in a pinch. I could probably get it higher than that if I limit cpu clocks on battery, but I don't think I'll bother, this thing isn't really meant for that. Only reason I was running on battery was so I could hook into my gigabit lan to grab files off of my main PC, and I decided to see how long it'd last.

    Performance wise it's impressive, I was seeing 3.4ghz all core and 1230mhz on the gpu, and temps were hitting a max of 62-63C on both with the stock fan curve using afterburner to monitor. I pumped the fans to max as it has one of the hotkeys setup for it and temps dropped to 48C gpu and 56C cpu, under load! That's extremely impressive, I don't really see any reason to mess with the stock tim, it's already running very cool. There's not danger of throttling, and actually the gpu could probably be pumped up some and maybe a 2700X dropped in, it has plenty of cooling overhead. That'd make one hell of a portable workstation, but I'll probably wait for zen2 and maybe drop the 2700X from my main desktop in this if I upgrade. I have another 16gb of 2400mhz ram in my Dell that I might swap over for full 32gb, but we'll see, it'll depend on how it does on some of the 3df zephyr stuff I'm working on.
     
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