Acer Predator Triton 700

Discussion in 'Acer' started by sicily428, Apr 27, 2017.

  1. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Lighter isn't better, when it comes to 1080's / 1070's, look to a larger frame Acer / MSI for better cooling.

    It's really easy to get used to a nice 17" "heavy" laptop, really - just live with it for a few weeks and you'll build up muscles and perhaps even feel better and healthier in general from the exercise. ;)
     
  2. Greel

    Greel Notebook Evangelist

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    well its for school haha so thats why i preferred lighter and 15.6 or smaller (3 mile walk home with a heavy backpack). i dont think i need it to run AAA games at ultra, i have a 1080 desktop.


    i had a sort of cascade of events where i started off with a surface pro in mind with light gaming, but for that price i could get a cheap gaming pc that is light, but then for a few hundred dollars more you can upgrade the 1050ti/1060 to a 1070, and then the 1080 is only a little bit more :biglaugh:
     
  3. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Then maybe get a non-gaming laptop with long battery life for school, and build a nice gaming desktop for when you are at home?

    Surface is too expensive, there are lots of more reasonably priced 2in1's.

    A real gaming laptop is going to be expensive, heavy - or very noisy - or both.

    It's very easy to get caught up in the $250-$500 more for more performance race to the bottom of our wallets, it's better to stop well before moth's fly. ;)
     
  4. Greel

    Greel Notebook Evangelist

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    depends what surface i go for, i saw some used ones for around $400. i was planning on a new one for $800 (keyboard included) with a 256gb ssd. currently im using an m3 2 in 1 and its just too weak for school, which is why i was looking at the surface.

    i had an oled alienware 13 with a 1060. i'm not a huge gamer, just like to play a few hours a day so the 13 inch was fine for me, and i just dont like the 17 inch laptops. i also have my desktop too but im not really home enough to use it more than a couple times a week.

    reason i got rid of the alienware was that it weighed more than some 15 inch gaming laptops and yet didnt seem to preform that much better. (really heavy for its size so and i was getting really poor battery on just lite work compared to the life stated in reviews).


    i saw that the Triton weights slightly less than the alienware and has a better preformance (my r3 was 6700hq/8gb) plus a nice keyboard and screen so it peaked my interested but honestly a 1060 or 1070 is more than enough. as far as price i paid $1700 for the alienware so $2200 seamed like a decent increase in performance to dollar. the alienware was a 6700HQ
     
  5. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Yeah, I'm not saying $2200 isn't a good price, it's just got a lot of competition down around that range that are newer models.

    The Alienware's are just too random in performance, the 8950HK in particular, but all in general have a high incidence of poor QA on the heatsink / thermals - some come out fine, many people come here for solutions and spend a lot of time or money on fixing them.

    If you don't like the Triton 700 after a few days, you'll know by then, send it back and look some more. :)

    @mason2smart and others can tell you of their 1st hand experience with Surface hardware. :)

    Since you brought up refurb / older Surface models:

    Microsoft Surface Laptops and Tablets Not Recommended by Consumer Reports
    The problem is predicted reliability, with estimated two-year breakage rates of 25 percent
    By Consumer Reports, August 10, 2017
    https://www.consumerreports.org/lap...-tablets-not-recommended-by-consumer-reports/

    The Best 2-in-1 Laptops
    These versatile computers could make you forget all about needing a dedicated tablet
    By Nicholas Deleon
    Last updated: August 15, 2018
    https://www.consumerreports.org/laptop-computers/best-2-in-1-laptops/

    Best Laptops for College Students
    According to our testers, these models score high marks for performance and battery life
    By Tercius Bufete
    Last updated: August 16, 2018
    https://www.consumerreports.org/laptop-computers/best-laptops-for-college-students/
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2018 at 4:43 AM
  6. Greel

    Greel Notebook Evangelist

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    tell me about it haha, it was a hassle just to get my AW from Dell. luckily thermals werent horrible.

    the surface models i was looking at are the 2017 models, people are selling them in anticipation of the Microsoft event and they still have their warranties. in all honestly i upgrade around the 2 or 3 year mark, so not too worried about that reliability.

    the older ones i have seen for around 200 but im not interested in them. i previously had the surface pro 2.

    i cant view those articles it wasnt me to pay a subscription. i can tell you that i've looked over many laptops in the lower price range and have bought a few. pretty happy with my m3 machine for just non-work/entertainment/browsing it just chokes when opening big excel files.

    still wanna give gaming laptop a look before i buy just an ultrabook. so many decent light ones for around $1500.
     
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  7. Greel

    Greel Notebook Evangelist

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    @hmscott hey im looking at the MSI GE laptops instead now. i see the 7700hq version goes for much less than the acer. also see the 8750h GE version for about the same as the acer

    is the 8750h performance worth the $600 price difference?

    im dealing with Visual Studio, project, excel, and visio in school and would like to get more into premiere, lightroom, and photoshop. other than that gaming
     
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  8. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    It's hard to say, the 7700hq is a locked CPU @ 4c/8t and is going to benchmark much lower than the 8750hq on multithreaded tests. Some builds have trouble with the added heat from the extra 2c/4t (6c/12t total) of the new 8th gen CPU's, so be sure and check performance and temperature tests in reviews - usually they won't undervolt, which means the temps at 100% load are 10c higher than they need to be, so when you get it and undervolt it you should see better temps.

    Watch out for 1070's in the thinner laptops too, they run hot.

    Spend as much time as you can spare learning about the models you are interested in before buying them, and when getting them at retail don't get open box / returned units - and make sure you know the return period exactly, usually from the date on the sales receipt - it should be printed on the receipt back/front how long you have to return it without hassle - usually 7-30 days - typically 15 days.

    Check out the support forums here for your model, and on the MSI forums, etc. :)
     
  9. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    You might have already seen it, but this is a fair review, and mentions that the size limits the cooling, but it holds up under gaming - just a bit noisy. :)

    MSI GE73 Raider RGB 8RF Review
    https://www.overclock3d.net/reviews/systems/msi_ge73_raider_rgb_8rf_review/1

    "Conclusion
    Whenever we're reviewing laptops there are always a few things to take into consideration, and how well it fits your particular needs and your willingness to accept certain factors are a strong element that has to be contemplated.

    With the MSI GE73 Raider RGB 8RF you're getting a huge amount of hardware, all wrapped up in a chassis that can just about handle it all. Let's start with the headline items. The CPU is the Intel Core i7-8750H, a six core, twelve thread CPU that reports at around 2.2 GHz and goes all the way up to 3.9 GHz depending upon core loading and thermals. The thermals we'll get to in a moment, but what it boils down to is that you have plenty of threads if you plan on utilising something that prefers more cores to raw clock speed, yet if you're gaming which normally just uses a couple of cores then you're not being limited by low clock speeds and instead you get some pretty beefy clocks. This is backed up by Intel's UHD 630 graphics which keep the desktop battery life nice and long, but when the going gets intense then the nVidia GTX 1070 takes over and produces smooth frame rates at maximum image quality settings on the 1080P display. As we said in our intro you can get the Raider in two flavours with either a 60Hz 4K screen or a 120Hz 1080 screen, and we hugely recommend the latter. 4K screens below 27" or so are pretty pointless and certainly at 17" they do nothing other than suck the juice and kill your eyesight. Whereas 120Hz is a benefit that everyone can enjoy and the panel in the GE73 Raider 8RF is excellent, giving rich colours and consistent brightness. It's also worth noting that the GTX 1070 inside the 8RF is overclocked, but also kept cool enough that the nVidia GPU Boost technology can work its magic and boy does it ever, giving scores and frame rates close to, and sometimes better than, the scores we saw from the GTX 1080 in the ASUS Zephyrus GX501G.

    There are, however, a couple of downsides to the GE73 Raider RGB 8RF and both of them are related to the same thing. All laptop manufacturers have a handful of chassis designs that they use across their range. The type that the Raider uses is usually found on their mid to mid-high range models and has been successful when we've reviewed it previously with quad core processors inside it. We think that the cooling capacity and physical size, thus battery size, isn't quite enough to handle the upgraded components within. Let's be clear, it never overheats, it just gets very warm which in our longer tests showed up by the CPUs inability to be heavily turbo'd for long periods. Looking at the Raider versus the Zephyrus, both equipped with the same CPU, it was clear that the slightly larger ASUS model allowed for higher performance. Of course if you're running this as a gaming machine then CPU performance is less of an issue and clearly the Raider smoked the games happily, but you also need to keep it plugged in. It's more of a portable system kept near a plug than it is a mobile laptop. If you accept this then it doesn't really matter how long the battery life is or isn't as you need to plug it in to let the hardware stop crippling itself in power saving modes and run flat out. We still would much rather have a laptop a bit thicker but with beefier battery life and great cooling than pretend that a inch thick 17" sized laptop is more portable than a 1.5" thick one. That is an argument for another day, as thin is still king.
    If you accept that you're buying a system which runs a little warm, a little loud (because the fans are struggling to keep it cool) and needs to be plugged in 90% of the time, then the MSI GE73 Raider RGB 8RF is a seriously capable gaming laptop and brings a lot of power to the table. If we were buying it we'd spec the excellent 120Hz 1080 display and we'd definitely swap the SSD out for a M.2 model. But six cores and blinding gaming performance for just a shade over 2 grand is tempting enough to win the MSI Raider our Gamers Choice Award."

    Also, not sure why they are harping on the 90% of the time you need to keep it plugged in, as all dGPU's need full power from the wall to get full performance - you get limited performance from the battery as you increase the dGPU / CPU power requirements. All high end gaming laptops need to be plugged in, this surprises some newbies, but it's well known.
     
  10. Greel

    Greel Notebook Evangelist

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    hey thx for the review, im actually looking at the 15.6 version.

    from what i've read it throttles to 3.1 but thats still better than the 7700hq for my school.
    also read if i undervolt it and do the cooling upgrades it should run okay (going to pay xotic for kryonaut and pads)
    im looking at the sku with 16gb ram and 256gb m.2. (1tb hdd included as well)
    xotic rep was telling me screen is pretty nice for my school work even tho its TN (120hz, no gsync)
    battery life will be less than the surface pro i was looking at for school, but i think its long enough for a class or two of words and then plug it in when i need to use the more intense programs.


    im just a few dollars under my budget, otherwise i would upgrade to 32gb of ram.
     
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