Acer Predator Helios 500

Discussion in 'Acer' started by Alex771, Aug 14, 2018.

  1. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKS = That sucks! Dont wast your $ on FILTHY

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    Don't have too big hopes. The 8750H in same Acer Helios 500’s chassis and with exactly same cooling scored 6% below the average of all 8750H samples in our database. This doesn't smell good for an unlocked Core i9 chips.
    Up to the OEM manufactures put adeqvate power limits in firmware. Everything can be locked down if the goal is to avoid too big RMA numbers.
    upload_2018-9-3_3-22-57.png
     
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  2. GrandesBollas

    GrandesBollas Notebook Consultant

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    Thank you, again, @Papusan. It truly is an honor for me to learn from you and others who take the time to answer questions. I now have a better feel for what I am reading from those benchmark results. I took a look at similar results for the Aorus X7 V8 and saw similar performance constraints imposed by the laptop manufacturer (power limit throttling).

    Curious, I started pulling a string on cooling solutions. I found a picture for the Helios 500:

    upload_2018-9-2_22-5-18.png

    But, I couldn't find a picture of the Aorus X7 V8 internals. At least from the above, we can see that the use of a shared heat sink is a poor decision; GPU temperature will drive up CPU temperature and result in thermal throttling. Wouldn't surprise me that the Helios's BIOS forces the CPU/GPU to stay in thermal balance at the expense of TDP regardless of overclockability.

    For completeness, here is a picture of the X5 V8 thermal solution:

    upload_2018-9-2_22-14-32.png
     
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  3. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKS = That sucks! Dont wast your $ on FILTHY

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    Review: Aorus X7 DT v8-elchapuzasinformatico.com
    [​IMG]
     
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  4. GrandesBollas

    GrandesBollas Notebook Consultant

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  5. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKS = That sucks! Dont wast your $ on FILTHY

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  6. undervolter0x0309

    undervolter0x0309 Notebook Consultant

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    Thanks for the stats @Papusan!

    Why do they do this? Is there a genuine safety concern? Maybe overheating or motherboard bending with time? Maybe the overheating next to the battery can cause a hazard?
     
  7. GrandesBollas

    GrandesBollas Notebook Consultant

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    Look at the heat sink design. CPU/GPU shared. No way this laptop can effectively manage cooling. Given that design constraint, the BIOS locks the system so that performance is sacrificed for temperature control.
     
  8. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKS = That sucks! Dont wast your $ on FILTHY

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    Several reasons. First.. The cooling isn't good enough (see max temp with low power consumption). Intel recommended 100w PL1 and 125w PL2 power limits for mobile i9-8950Hk. As you know... They couldn't manage to create good enough cooling for Gtx 1080 in this 17,3 inches chassis. And the chassis isn't the thinnest out there either.
    upload_2018-9-4_19-0-29.png

    Second... RMA and tech support cost money. Max temp is already near 100C

    Third... Offer crippled performance means they hope their customers will come back and upgrade before time. All boils down to cost and savings.
     
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  9. undervolter0x0309

    undervolter0x0309 Notebook Consultant

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    What a waste of potential :/. Thanks for the info.
    If we are to rethink cooling in a laptop, is the shared heatsink a nonstarter?
     
  10. Deks

    Deks Notebook Prophet

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    Huh... the Intel/NV version of Helios 500 seems to be badly designed in terms of cooling.
    Laptop cannot achieve its potential, and it runs too hot on stock it seems.

    This doesn't seem to bode well for the version with Ryzen 2700 and V56 (unless Acer decided to rework the cooling for it).

    EDIT: Nope, seems like they gimped the Ryzen/Vega56 Helios 500 pretty well.
    The CPU barely gets 1500 in CB multithreaded - whereas my 1700 in GL702ZC gets about 1450.
    As for the GPU... I don't understand what's happening there... in most games, the V56 gets ridiculously low results vs 1070... what have they done to the GPU?
    Run down the clocks to rock bottom but never optimized the voltages? Seems about right.
    Or it might be the case of thermal throttling (which undervolting might fix?).
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2018
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