Acer Aspire One Review Discussion

Discussion in 'Notebook News and Reviews' started by dietcokefiend, Sep 1, 2008.

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  1. dietcokefiend

    dietcokefiend DietGreenTeaFiend

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    The Acer Aspire One is a 8.9" netbook with a starting price that is aimed to undercut nearly all the current market competitors. The base Aspire One, which includes an 8GB SSD and Linux starts at $329, which is far under anything else that has the Intel Atom processor. The big question running through everyone's minds is if this model is built like a budget computer, or if it has what it takes to go up against some models that sell for nearly double the retail price. In this review we cover all aspects of the Acer Aspire One, and let you know if this is a netbook you should consider purchasing.

    Read the full content of this Article: Acer Aspire One Review

     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2015
  2. menos

    menos Notebook Evangelist NBR Reviewer

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  3. John Ratsey

    John Ratsey Moderately inquisitive Super Moderator

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    Thanks for the review.

    It closely matches the Sony G11 for performance but would need a 12 cell battery to match the G11's battery run time.

    What is the size / weight (including cables) / rating of the PSU?

    It might also help readers if you can put some numbers against WSVGA.

    John
     
  4. fabarati

    fabarati Frorum Obfuscator

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    It seems halfway decent. Fancy that. I did like the performance of that HDD. It was fast!

    But Acer commits one of the biggest netbook sins: small battery. The whole point of these small, cheap, low performing devices is decent battery life. And once again, the netbooks doesn't deliver.

    Also good to see you include CoreAVC in the testing procedure. Modernized tests FTW!

    Last thing: I still abhor the name Netbook. It's just so... wrong. Short, bad. Awful. Too Intel-y.
     
  5. Knightendo

    Knightendo Notebook Consultant

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    well i guess having a "larger" battery would probably drive the cost of the notebook up, therefore killing purpose of a small, cheap laptop.
     
  6. fabarati

    fabarati Frorum Obfuscator

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    Not if it's done at the expense of usability. Netbooks aren't meant as a first computer, but a complement. Think Macbook Air, only smaller and cheaper. For a netbook to be useful, it needs a 3h+ batterylife. Otherwise, what's the point? It's too small and too low-performance for many tasks. All these little buggers are good for are mild computing on the go.

    There are full 15.4" laptops, with about the same price, same batterylife as this one (if not better) and much better performance. They're not small, but they would give you more for your money.

    Now, I am a (urgh) netbook proponent. If done properly. That means small & portable, decent (usable) performance, low price and high batterylife. That's the essential part of a netbook. The rest give you value for money, but unless the for pillars aren't there, it's not a proper netbook.

    That's why I'd much rather have a smaller, cheaper SSD than a fast HDD, and instead be able to use the laptop longer.

    ... Wow, Ranting.
     
  7. cy007

    cy007 Notebook Deity

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    Judging from your battery-life test, the Aspire One should manage a little less than 5 hrs with the 6-cell battery yes?

    The netbook looks sweet. I think I'd get one by the end of the year if I can justify the purchase. Being able to play games like Deus Ex, Diablo II, Quake III, and any previous-gen 800x600 adventure title on a 8.9" screen is needless to say awesome, but how practical is such a computer exactly? Taking notes at class? I make better notes with paper. Surfing the net at a cafe? I barely do so - once a month at best. Doing homework while at the great outdoors? Staring at a 8.9 screen for more than 2 hours would probably give me a headache. The more I think of it, the more I don't understand the netbook fad. Just like i-phone... all bling, no substance. :p

    ..anyone?
     
  8. Ahbeyvuhgehduh

    Ahbeyvuhgehduh Lost in contemplation....

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    Hmm ... so the mouse button/touchpad arrangement takes getting used to ... still not sure if I would want to go through learning that. :D

    Still ... its a nice looking machine for its "class".
     
  9. Rahul

    Rahul Notebook Prophet

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    Like others, I'm waiting for the $400 model to come to the U.S with a 160gb HDD and 6 cell battery.

    For the price, its a very good netbook, I think this is the real potential EEE killer. :)
     
  10. fabarati

    fabarati Frorum Obfuscator

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    I'll take this one. Using the exact same examples: I make better notes on the computer, I surf at cafés. I do homework in the great outdoors. And I don't get headaches from staring at a 8.9" screen for mor than 2 hours. If I compare this to my present study laptop, which is a 12" Powerbook, it does the same thing with a brighter screen and just less than half the weight. They keyboard is smaller, of course, but I have small hands. Performance is not important. The powerbook achieves about 4-5 hours of surfing and notetaking. If I could get this done on a smaller and lighter laptop for about the same price as I paid for the powerbook (used), I'd have gotten that.
     
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