ABS / TC Problem

Discussion in 'Motorized Vehicles' started by millermagic, Jul 3, 2010.

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  1. millermagic

    millermagic Rockin the pinktop

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    I know how to handle my car; I know the limits. I feel safer, and have proven to be so, without the electronic "nannies" turned off.

    I was under the car this weekend and I think it's actually a speed sensor on a wheel going out. The ones on the wheels are NOT the ones that set the speedo (rather that's a sensor on the output of the transmission). Anyway, the part where the sensor mounts is rusted away. It's likely that either side on the front is felling off.

    Looking at all of that, the bearing, hub, etc pretty much made the decision that we're going to be sending it off to the junkyard in the sky in a month or two :(
     
  2. KLF

    KLF NBR Super Modernator Super Moderator

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    That's exactly what I was thinking, just the actual technology varies between manufacturers.

    That seems to be ford owners universal feeling, they would like to shoot their cars in to the orbit... :D
     
  3. linuxwanabe

    linuxwanabe Notebook Evangelist

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    Good for you.

    However, the Stability Control debate is pretty much over as the feature is being phased in a government mandate - only 15 years after the technology was proven.



    A speed sensor isn't a big deal. You can expect them to succumb to corrosion, regardless of the condition of the rest of the car.

    I also would advise you not to judge any 10 year old car solely on the basis of the hubs, which invariably be rusty looking in Upstate NY. I'd consider the mileage, mechanical condition and the level of overall corrosion.
     
  4. millermagic

    millermagic Rockin the pinktop

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    My "beef" with stability control isn't so much when it's working right, but when it's not working right. How will I know that 6 years from now, a sensor isn't going to go bad and decide to put on the left front brake while I'm going down the highway at 55mph. I'd rather not have a computer, electronics (which can fault) controlling safety devices.

    It's the same thing with the electronic throttles. If I lived in the south where connectors, sensors never rust out and go bad it wouldn't be a problem.

    Personal preference. I will never be convinced that it makes the vehicle any safer.

    This is more of a 'last straw' type of deal There's a slew of other stuff wrong with the car due to rust. I could name off a list, but I won't.
     
  5. linuxwanabe

    linuxwanabe Notebook Evangelist

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    Wow, you really aren't familiar with modern vehicle electronics?

    Basically, an ABS/Stability Control system is failsafe, meaning that if a sensor or module fails, the system simply becomes inoperative and you get a warning light.

    Actually, electronic throttles are lot safer, since there's no throttle cable that can stick. I remember a few years back Chrysler had a recall on 3.7 and 4.7 truck engines for sticking throttle cables. Condensation from under the hood could have caused the throttle cables to freeze in an open position. Oddly enough, the 5.7 Hemi wasn't effected by the recall? Why? It had an electronic throttle. So as you see, electronic throttles are less of a safety risk than old fashioned cables.

    Your belief isn't supported by the evidence.


    Go ahead, "name off a list." I'll bet that I've fixed most of your issues. The only time rust becomes terminal is when the sills are complete rusted through.
     
  6. flipfire

    flipfire Moderately Boss

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    Have you checked the ABS relay?
     
  7. millermagic

    millermagic Rockin the pinktop

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    I haven't had sills in over a year haha :p



    I think the most I am going to do about it now is mention there's an ABS problem when I sell it. I might take a gander this weekend if I get a free hour or so.
     
  8. linuxwanabe

    linuxwanabe Notebook Evangelist

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    In that case, I think that a speed sensor is the least of your problems. Unless you are a gifted welder, it might be time to consider throwing in the towel.
     
  9. millermagic

    millermagic Rockin the pinktop

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    I take it you're in GB? For some reason my state doesn't require the rocker panels / sills to be there. As long as the car passes emissions inspection, it's good.

    I passed "safety" inspection in June with broken rear springs, bad ball joints, holes in the body, etc, etc. It's more of an emissions thing not safety.
     
  10. linuxwanabe

    linuxwanabe Notebook Evangelist

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    New York State went down the same road as California with emissions testing - although the actual "testing" only amounts to plugging into the OBD-II port.

    There are some real safety items on the inspection check list, but there are also a surprising number of omissions. I personally think that emissions testing actually took attention away from safety issues.

    As far as broken springs, that tends to happen when the shock go. Ball joints are to be expected with age, especially on front drive cars.

    Rust perforation can be fixed on a cosmetic level, without too much effort and expense. The DIY approach can also work with holes in the floorpan. However, the sills on a modern unitized body car are structurally critical, just like the frame on traditional car or truck.

    Sadly, I've seen a few really dangerous cars on the highway, like a 15 year old Altima that was pretty much missing its entire sills. The metal was gone and you could see daylight. Maybe the British have the right idea with MOT inspections.
     
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