8700K and Cryorig M9i - skyrocket temp to 95C in Asus Real Bench

Discussion in 'Desktop Hardware' started by sew333, Jan 22, 2018.

  1. sew333

    sew333 Notebook Guru

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    HI. I have 8700K on stock with mobo Asus Z370 Pro Gaming + case Fractal Design R5. Cpu temps on games are fine 70C+.

    3dmark physic test looped 70-80C.
    Unigine Heave 50-65C max on some spots.
    Crysis 3 first level 60-72C

    When i run Asus Real Bench it skyrockets in stress test to 95C, and i am stopping test.
    In Prime95 its worst with small ftt,but i guess its using AVX.
    Any ideas why it causing this?
    My cpu cooler is Cryorig M9i.Cpu is not overclocked.

    XMP profile enabled in bios on memory 3000mhz. UEFI STOCK bios. Cpu clocks during test 4700mhz so auto oc is on.

    Is sense to play with this for syntetics only? Thanks. I am only testing games.
     
  2. Danishblunt

    Danishblunt Notebook Virtuoso

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    The AVX issue you're talking about is only a problem haswell have, after haswell intel removed the over voltage crap again.

    Delidd the CPU, apply conduconaut , lid it again, get some kryonaut and then enjoy your 4.7ghz with decent temps.
     
  3. KY_BULLET

    KY_BULLET Notebook Evangelist

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    My 8700k is delidded with CLU under the lid and Kryonaut on top. I've yet to see temps over 60c while gaming for hours. I'm being generous on those temps too. I played PUBG for 3 hours yesterday at sustained 4.6ghz @1.29v and never broke 50c. Now this is with an EVGA AIO cooler and 68F ambient temperature. You might want to look into getting an AIO cooler as well if your case can accommodate it.

    My temps weren't horrible when on air but they were high enough to where I would have to keep a close eye on it while gaming.

    Charlie
     
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  4. Danishblunt

    Danishblunt Notebook Virtuoso

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    Well to be fair, PubG isn't CPU demanding. The game uses like 1 or 2 cores, rest is low %.
     
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  5. KY_BULLET

    KY_BULLET Notebook Evangelist

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    I've never looked into. I will look later after I get home and see how much it uses.

    My heat problem is my GPU. I need to get an AIO or Arctic Accellero on it. Its managable right now but when summertime gets here, its gonna be a different story.
     
  6. smoking2k

    smoking2k Notebook Consultant

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    Something seems off try re-pasting and seating the cooler. I have a 8700k at 4.7 all cores and gets to mid 70's on a coolermaster D92 which isn't much bigger than the m9i in aida64 (uses avx) stress test after a prolonged period. also with that case I'm not sure why you went with that cooler as you have room for up to
    • CPU coolers up to 180mm in height
     
  7. KY_BULLET

    KY_BULLET Notebook Evangelist

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    Yep PUBG only uses like 30% CPU. More GPU demanding, it stays between 90-100% all the time in game.
     
  8. PaladinPC

    PaladinPC Notebook Enthusiast

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    A few notes:

    1. As already mentioned by @KY_BULLET and @Danishblunt , video games (like PUBG for example) don't tend to be as CPU intensive as they are GPU intensive. Synthetic benchmarks like Prime95 (which was originally made to crunch numbers for academic research) put what most people would consider an unrealistically high amount of load on CPUs. Most people won't be trying to push 100% on all cores of their CPU at all times, unless they are heavily multitasking or running custom programs. Otherwise, most consumer programs are optimized well enough that it shouldn't require all of your CPU's full power. But as a general rule: the more cores you use and the higher amount of load you put on each core, the higher your temperatures will go.
    2. The point of delidding, if you're not aware of this already, is to replace the stock TIM (thermal interface material) between the IHS (integrated heat spreader) of the CPU (i.e. the metal face plate you see with 8700K printed on it) and the actual silicon of the CPU (the real brains of your CPU). Intel has decided to cheap out on the TIM for the past few generations of processors, and this TIM tends to be a worse thermal conductor than most aftermarket thermal paste on the market, especially the liquid metals like Thermal Grizzly Conductonaut or CL Liquid Ultra. Removing the stock TIM and replacing it with even a non-liquid metal TIM like Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut will see better thermals for your CPU. That being said, delidding will void your warranty with Intel, so make sure you're sure you want to do so before proceeding.
    3. I agree with @smoking2k in that you may want to look in to upgrading your CPU cooler given that your case has plenty of room for even massive tower coolers like the Noctua NH-D15. Of course, you don't necessarily need a super beefy air cooler or monster AIO for the 8700K, but I would recommend at least a Cryorig H7 or some other 120 mm cooler for it. i7's tend to push a lot of heat given that they are considered the top-of-the-line consumer chip outside of the HEDT platforms like X299. At the very least, you may want to re-seat your cooler and get some decent aftermarket thermal paste.

    Hope this helps!
     
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