7567 w/ IPS panel or?

Discussion in 'Dell' started by raythelightning, Mar 28, 2017.

  1. raythelightning

    raythelightning Newbie

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    What are the chances that it will have it? I might go with the dell regardless, as battery life is quite important.
    Also, how easy is the Dell to upgrade? Should I buy a lower cost model and just replace all the components that I don't like? I know some people actually replaced screens with an IPS model.
     
  2. don_svetlio

    don_svetlio Notebook Deity

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    RAM and drives are easy to upgrade but the screen may be tricky - you need to find a compatible 15.6' IPS panel and then be extremely careful not to damage the connector as ribbon cables are very, very delicate and impossible to repair. You'd need a new cable and routing that requires total disassembly and that would likely void warranty.
     
  3. kent1146

    kent1146 Notebook Prophet

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    Absolutely worth it. The laptop display is THE most important component of the laptop that you can configure**.

    Other configurable components (i.e. slightly faster CPU, slightly faster GPU, slightly more RAM, slightly higher capacity storage) are lower priority. The reason is because if have a laptop with a TN-based display, then you have a laptop with poor display quality. Even if you choose to upgrade CPU / GPU / RAM / SSD, all you did was buy slightly faster hardware sitting behind a poor-quality display.

    My recommendation on the priority of upgrades, with explanations, in a laptop are:
    • Good screen first (it's hard to upgrade; you use this component 100% of the time you use your laptop)
    • Good GPU (it's hard to upgrade)
    • Enough RAM - at least 16GB (running out of RAM will make laptop performance suffer)
    • Upgrade from HDD --> SSD as your primary OS / applications / games drive (this is the single best upgrade you can make when it comes to laptop performance. Whether the SSD is SATA-3 or M.2 PCIe doesn't really matter. Just make sure you are not running your OS / applications on a mechanical HDD).
    • CPU upgrades (if you are running heavily multi-threaded applications, prioritize this higher. But improvements to just CPU clock speed will not yield you any noticeable performance benefits).
    You don't need to have everything factory-configured for you. It is only the display, GPU, and CPU that need to be factory-configured. Some laptops have non-upgradeable RAM that is soldered on to the motherboard, which you will also want factory-configured (but this doesn't affect you). But if you find that it's better / cheaper for you to upgrade the RAM and SSD yourself, then feel free to do it with aftermarket parts.

    But always make sure you get a good display, above any other upgrade.
     
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  4. raythelightning

    raythelightning Newbie

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    Well, the dell has a 4k display, and that will probably be overkill for the 1050ti, especially if I want to game. Which laptop would you recommend in the same price range?
     
  5. kent1146

    kent1146 Notebook Prophet

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    The Dell Inspirion 7567. You can buy a better laptop. You can buy a cheaper laptop. But you can't buy a better, cheaper laptop.

    If you want the 4K screen for whatever reason (touchscreen, image quality, sharpness, etc), then get the 4K screen. If you game, just game at 1080p (or lower).

    Running at non-native resolution on a 4K screen isn't really a big deal. 1080p is a perfect multiple of 4K, so your screen will simply illuminate 4 pixels for every 1 pixel from a 1080p image that it is told to draw. Second, when you're dealing with such high pixel densities, you don't really get the "blurry" effect from pixel interpolation when running at non-native resolution. Pixel interpolation is there. But the pixels are so small, you don't really notice it. The image quality drop from turning down graphics settings due to running on a GeForce 1050Ti is going to overshadow whatever infinitesimal differences you'd get from running non-native on a 4K display.
     
  6. raythelightning

    raythelightning Newbie

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    I've had the chance to try the 4k 7567, and tried running dota 2 on the same specs as my desktop (I use a GTX 970), and it had about 1/4 the FPS that I have on my desktop. Is that because of the screen, or is something else happening there? I did run it at 1080p, but it wasn't that much of an improve on fps. Is this to be expected because of the 4k screen?
    This also brings me to my initial question; should I get the 7567 w/ the TN panel and switch the screen with an IPS, or, should I wait a bit, spend roughly the same and get the Y720? Again, battery life is sort of important here.
     
  7. don_svetlio

    don_svetlio Notebook Deity

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    The Y720's GPU is much more powerful as it uses a 1060 rather than a 1050 (Ti) - the 970 desktop is only slightly slower than a 1060.
     
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  8. edit1754

    edit1754 Notebook Prophet

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    Do be aware the Y720 however only uses a 45% NTSC color gamut IPS panel for the FHD option. Fine (still not ideal but fine) for $800 laptops IMO, and is what the Inspiron 7559 used last year, however I wish Lenovo would have chosen a 72% NTSC color gamut IPS FHD panel instead, for the Y720. Most $1300 GTX 1060 laptops use 72% NTSC color gamut IPS panels.

    http://forum.notebookreview.com/thr...ut-45-ntsc-ips-display-rather-than-72.803874/

    The good news: The 4K models of the Y720 (as well as the Inspiron 7567 but not 7559) use true-4K panels, rather than PenTile (RG/BW) not-true-4K like some laptops do.
     
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  9. G-Force

    G-Force Notebook Consultant

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    I've used the 1080p 7567 for a few weeks now and I really hate the default screen. It's very dim, has a really bad constrast ratio and also is a panel with a high response time. Not to mention the colors, which are absolutely horrible.

    However, the laptop itself is really awesome, including the battery life.

    I've ordered an AUO B156HAN01.2 IPS panel with a wider color gamut (72% NTSC) and higher max. brightness (300 nit vs 220 nit) and I will be building it in as soon as I receive it.

    The Lenovo Y720 is a very nice laptop, but the specs sheet says it's 3,2 kg in weight. That's insanely heavy for a 15" laptop in my opinion. This Dell is already 2,6 kg and I would not want it to be a gram heavier.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2017
  10. don_svetlio

    don_svetlio Notebook Deity

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    3.2kg is when you factor in the power brick - else it should be about 2.8 which is perfectly fine for a high-end device.
     
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