5400 vs. 7200 hard drive?

Discussion in 'Apple and Mac OS X' started by dcook101, Apr 28, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. dcook101

    dcook101 Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    15
    So I'm interested in purchasing an MBP but don't know what hard drive I should get. I'm fairly familiar with computer stuff so I'm assuming that if I get the 7200rpm hard drive, it'll perform faster. But I'm concerned with the heat issue. If I do get the 7200 hard drive instead of the 5400, will it generate more heat and therefore be unusable on my lap? Thanks for reading.

    David
     
  2. Boseman

    Boseman Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    5
    I used to have a seagate 4200 HD in my windows laptop but then I changed it to seagate 7200rpm one and there was on change in the heat so I would go for the 7200 alot faster :D
     
  3. mmakay

    mmakay Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    38
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    5
    Strange, but true....

    5400rpm drives run hotter than 4200rpm, but 7200rpm drives run COOLER than 5400rpm drives! The 7200's have some new tech in them, so they are more efficient.
     
  4. xAMDvsIntelx

    xAMDvsIntelx Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    464
    Messages:
    3,221
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    105
    I've never heard that before - from my experiences, with a 7200 RPM drive, your notebook will run hotter and on battery, use more power, which will shave off about 20-30 minutes of run time. The 7200 RPM drive by itself shouldn't cause any issues, but coupled with the MBP's generated heat, it may get uncomfortable.
     
  5. Ervin

    Ervin Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    12
    Messages:
    170
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    30
    I've never heard that either. Many people complaining about heat issues have fast (up to 2 GHz) Core Duos coupled with 7200 rpm HDDs in small laptops.

    I think it depends on the size of the notebook. A 17" one dissipates the heat more easily than a 14" one. Just my 2 cents.
     
  6. dcook101

    dcook101 Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    15
    Man I never knew it could shave off 20-30 minutes!!! Perhaps I should reevaluate my wants/needs for the 7200 rpm hard drive. Thanks for the posts so far.
     
  7. totti

    totti Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    127
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    30
    if you've enough RAMs in your system the rpm is not a very important factor
     
  8. Niemitz

    Niemitz Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    125
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    30
  9. Boseman

    Boseman Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    5
    Still got for the 7200 one tho. The seagate one doesn't use any more power than the 4200 plus if they use a seagate one you get 5 year warranty with it :D
     
  10. totti

    totti Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    127
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    30
    stuart,

    It's because the RAMs are used all the time. But the hard drive is idle most of the time. In fact,we only use it when booting up, loading programs and saving data.

    However if the system is runing out of RAM, Windows uses the paging file
    (which is a part of the hard drive) as RAMs so the hard drive becomes the bottleneck of the system (because it is the slowest component)

    Hard drive intensive applications are few. Mostly these dealing with data of hundreds of MBs or more at a time like installing games or recoring video and audio. In these cases, the hard drive speed limits the speed, the resolution you can record without dropping frames or how many tracks you can simultaneously record.

    I think the new MacBook Pro with 1GB of RAM and 100 GB 5400 HDD would be fine. Now, if you can get the 2GB version it would be better. If not, you've the option to get one stick of 1GB and upgrade later.

    As for the extra 20 GB, this should not be a concern at all since the external hard drives available these days are huge, fast and really cheap.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page