500gb or 1tb m2. SSD Recommendation?

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Drew1, Aug 5, 2019.

  1. yrekabakery

    yrekabakery Notebook Virtuoso

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    http://www.anandtech.com/show/9009/ocz-vector-180-240gb-480gb-960gb-ssd-review/4

    “Most of the workloads are run independently in the trace, but obviously there are various operations (such as backups) in the background.”
     
  2. ole!!!

    ole!!! Notebook Prophet

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  3. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    The 'non-real-worldliness' of the Anandtech tests is that all the natural pauses of the real software they're trying to emulate are mostly removed. So much for real-world. :rolleyes:
     
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  4. ole!!!

    ole!!! Notebook Prophet

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    i have been following kristian vatto for awhile and his reviews i'd say he is pretty good but i'd take allyn from pcper, chris from tweaktown when comes to indepth analysis. allyn would go into details and break it down where as chris knows a lot just doesnt write it in his review cause its for mass consumers, those guys know a lot.
     
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  5. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    No, I'm not. :)

    But it doesn't take a rocket scientist to see the sustained, over time, improvements that OP'ing can do. ;)

    When I noticed this aspect of SSD's performance envelope is when I finally built a workstation that truly and completely beat out my old vRaptor (8 to 10, 10K RPM 1TB HDD's, not in RAID0) set up so many years ago.

    Before that, SSD's were just expensive junk.

    Even today, in my workflows and in any client whose notebook or desktop I decide to 'tune' for them (whose workflows are very different from mine...), OP'ing the SSD brings new life into their systems. Easily worth the loss of mere storage (even a few hundred GB's) for the trade of increased sustained, performance over time. And easily worth saving the cost of a new system or even a larger SSD that will perform at the same level very quickly with no OP'ing at all.

     
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  6. Drew1

    Drew1 Notebook Deity

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    Okay i looked through all the replies. Seems like since i want futureproof, best to go with the samsung evo and 1tb ssd right?
     
  7. Aivxtla

    Aivxtla Notebook Evangelist

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    A Phison E12 controller based drive like the Corsair MP510 would be good enough. At 1TB some of the E12 drives are with $10-20 of 660P and should be better battery and life wise. For 2 TB you’d be looking at around $230 with the MyDigital SSD BPX, occasionally you may get the Sabrent Rocket for less. Some of these drives have had pretty decent price reductions on occasion so you may get them for less depending on retailer.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2019
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  8. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Yeah there's nothing like future-proofing nowadays because new products are released every 6 months or a year!
    Writes heavy tasks go for Samsung Pro or like @Aivxtla suggested go for Phison E12 based drives.
     
  9. Robbo99999

    Robbo99999 Notebook Prophet

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    Yeah, I got the 1TB Sabrent Rocket, I recommend it too, it's great! It's basically a budget 970 Evo Plus, not quite as fast but nearly, and it's super cheap, cheaper or the same price as 1TB SATA SSD's here in the UK when I bought it (which is why it was a no brainer to buy this one) - 970 Evo Plus was twice the price if I remember!
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2019
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  10. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    Reading your posts on this thread I can't see how you picked 1TB and EVO as 'future-proof'?

    You're removing the old drives to add battery capacity, so battery life is important. Therefore: 660p.

    You will never have enough storage, no matter what capacity you buy today. Therefore 1TB nominal capacity which is closer to ~931GB actual capacity is also a bad choice, IMO. The 2TB models with OP'ing today and the foreseeable future not only offer higher sustained performance over time but when storage capacity becomes important in the not-too-distant future, you can simply expand the capacity as needed too. For less than the price of a 1TB EVO Plus, you can get that in an Intel 660p 2TB model and have more performance, longevity, and options further down the road than you can with the more power-hungry options (including the EVO and EVO Plus models).

    While the i5 based notebook you have isn't ideal for maximizing every other aspect of this platform, the Intel 660p 2TB model is still easily recommended for your setup and needs.

    Simply format it to a full 1024GB capacity and enjoy the speed as long as you can fit your workflows and workloads within that capacity. When not if, you need more capacity in the future, simply expand the capacity as needed to the full ~1862GB capacity on tap. Sure, you may see things slow down then if you're hammering the storage subsystem at that time. But it will be your choice to make too (and you can always expand to less than the full capacity and still see OP'ing gains too).

    With an SSD, more capacity = more performance. Buy the biggest you can afford (always; if performance is paramount).

    With higher capacity, OP'ing by 25% or more (I recommend 33%) will ensure you get the highest possible real-world performance from your SSD, sustained, over time, almost no matter how you use it.

    The Intel 660p gives the real-world performance that is effectively equivalent to competitors models. Where it excels is how it is able to extend battery life and also being more affordable too, usually having double the capacity for less $$$ than an EVO 1TB model.

    Don't get caught up in the 'scores', it is not what makes a system balanced, nor, future-proof for your needs.


     
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